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Need a wireles band freq.

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  • Need a wireles band freq.

    Some one told me that alarm systems that are wireless run on there own wireless frequince and there for can not be picked up on an 802.11g wireless detection system. If thats so is there a specific router or signial converter needed? and if so what frequincey band should i be looking for it to pick up or are they all universaly on the same frequincy like wireless internet.
    Ethical Schizophrenia is the substance of heroes. -Frank Rich

  • #2
    Originally posted by mad_malk View Post
    Some one told me that alarm systems that are wireless run on there own wireless frequince and there for can not be picked up on an 802.11g wireless detection system.
    Wi-Fi (all 802.11) in the US uses 2.4, 3.6 and 5 GHz. Alarm systems are generally in the lower portion of the UHF and VHF bands. I do not know for a fact, but have been told that some newer systems use the higher 2.4 GHz, etc.

    If thats so is there a specific router or signial converter needed?
    Needed for what?
    and if so what frequincey band should i be looking for it to pick up or are they all universaly on the same frequincy like wireless internet.

    Why?
    Remember those who died, remember those who killed them.

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    • #3
      Most traditional wireless security stuff is in the 315 -320 MHz frequency range (Linear brand is 315, GE Wireless is 319.5). Some of the newer brands also use 433 MHz and 868/869 MHz. Each manufacturer typically uses a proprietary data format, so one brand of equipment is generally not compatible with another brand of equipment, even if on the same frequency.

      There is no similarity at all between the format used by traditional wireless security equipment and the 802.11 standard. The frequencies used aren't anywhere close, so its doubtful that any type of conversion would be practical, nor would detection using an 802.11 device be possible.

      You could probably detect the signal coming from a wireless alarm transmitter using a standard communications receiver, but the signal would just be a very short burst of data so you would have to know what you were listening for in order to pick it out of the noise.

      Maybe if you could tell us a little more about what you want to do, we could give you some more specific advice.
      Michael A. Silva
      Silva Consultants

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      • #4
        They are updating a facility and it was stated that some buildings were setup vie wireless. now since we are misled at times i threw a curve ball and stated i didn't detect any wireless singles from X and then there was some braking and reversing. then all of a sudden it dawned on said person and they stated that it was on a different frequency . and since there has been some misleading statements i figured this was the place to verify some of what has been said.

        Namely if questionable statements get made i want to be able to throw back something like well i haven't been able to pick up any signals in X-Y frequency is the equipment not installed yet if they keep throwing out some BS.

        And it is a requirement for my job to know what areas are alarmed and which are not. So having accurate information is vital.
        Last edited by mad_malk; 08-04-2009, 03:41 AM.
        Ethical Schizophrenia is the substance of heroes. -Frank Rich

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        • #5
          The closest you could come to is buying what's called an RF Sniffer from each manufacturer. They make them to use for testing, to determine if a transmitter is working. But they are specific to that brand and frequency, and you might get stray signals from something else using that frequency. These are looking for a narrow window of non specific signals.

          Most all devices are serialized, they transmit the serial number data, so the system doesn't do anything with signals that fall in it's range, but don't belong to it. Any testers more advanced than the RF Sniffer would require knowing the serial numbers, or "learning" the device in.

          Visual inspection (makes the assumption that what you see works properly) and testing are the only ways to verify what's alarmed and what's not.
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          • #6
            Would it be easier to just let a cat loose in the buildings in questions and if the cops come then they are alarmed. Of course the cats would take the heat on this one
            THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
            THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
            http://www.boondocksaints.com/

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