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  • Gps

    We are noticing more stalkers using GPS technology to keep track of their targets (victims). Does anyone know of a way that these things can be detected or foiled? I'd really appreciate some input. Thanks.

  • #2
    Gps

    L. Reece:
    This is what I recommend for vehicles: Client vehicle(s) should be carefully checked for GPS vehicle-tracking devices. These devices can be as small as cigarette packages. Typically they are magnetically attached to the bumper or fender well for quick installation and retrieval; however, it can be hung or mounted anywhere in or on the vehicle. Monitored from anywhere, they can determine the route of travel and easily intercept either the principal or dependents drawing little or no attention. Attention to detail is critical. A professional automotive mechanic familar with the make and model should conduct a thorough examination of the vehicle. This is not fool-proof. Given time and access to the vehicle, it is possible to hide such a device in such a fashion as to render visual inspections useless.
    Suggest you contact Mr. Kevin D. Murray, CPP, CFE, BCFE, Director, Murray Associates - Counterespionage for his thoughts. Email [email protected] or telephone 800-635-0811.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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    • #3
      Thanks for your response.

      We do an initial search of client vehicles. We also advise clients to always try to park their vehicles in places inaccessible to the subject (eg. in a locked garage with motion lights and alarm). We are dealing with private citizens, usually women, who take the kids to daycare, park the vehicle in the parking lot at the grocery store, etc. So it's not always possible to make the vehicle inaccessible to the subject or his agent. We urge them to have alarms on their vehicles that are triggered by movement/touching the vehicle. At least this would alert the target to the possibility of someone having tampered with the vehicle while she was away from it. Unfortunately, these devices are so small, and so quickly attached and hidden, they can be difficult to detect by someone who, not only is not mechanically or technologically inclined, but who also wants to get into the vehicle and lock the doors as quickly as possible.

      I've been looking for technology to counter the device itself, to make it non-functional. Jammers and scramblers are illegal as far as I can determine. Someone tried to sell us a "detector", like bug detector equipment, but we chose not to purchase this because given the specs, we felt the device would not work. (Having said that, I have to admit, I'm technologically challenged.)

      Thank you again and thank you for the referral.

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      • #4
        If I'm correct, a good general purpose wideband frequency detector should be able to detect such devices. There's two cavets to this...

        1) The device must be transmitting data to be detected, since the frequency detector has to detect the transmission going out.

        2) You need someone competent enough to operate the device, and intrepret the readings.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          GPS Follow-up

          N.A. Corbier:
          That is why I always stress excellent resources, equipment designed to do the task at hand and above all else, training, training, training and more training. Then it is practice, practice and more practice.
          Simulations must be as realistic as possible. You start with easy models then graduate into the more sophisticated.
          Training must include distractors, unknown interference and the like.
          I always fall back to my Air Force Security Police training. After you have mastered the sidearm, you do reasonably well hiting a stationary target with little or no stress. The folks at Lackland AFB stressed the use of a handgun in stressful situations. You are required to double time around the firing line then resume your original place and fire three strings of two rounds each. One only hopes there are no low flying aircraft as they will be doomed. It is hard to concentrate on the fundamentals of breath control, sight alignment and trigger squeeze when your heart is trying to pound its way out of your chest. You have simulated stress. It can be done as training and practice are the keys to success.
          Now you understand why I refer my fellow security professionals to Kevin Murray. You survive his training, you can survive anything. The easy part is you're paying for it!
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            On SF training: Hehehe. Pretty soon, I'm going to be playing that game myself, as a National Guardsman. I've never believed in the stock "shoot stationary at paper" training for armed professionals that most states require for security officers. If your going to carry a pistol or rifle to protect life, you'd better be able to use it under duress.

            And, yes, the Rule of Twos does apply to anyone determined enough to actually slip a GPS unit on a client vehicle. Or vehicles. I mean, the bad guy went so far as to go somewhere, or order it online. He's gonna get two, because that's his mindset, a determined individual. Decoys are definately a threat.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              GPS Follow-up

              Hi Bill,


              Thank you for keeping me in mind. This is indeed a question that more and more people are asking. No one answer fits all situation.


              L. Reece won't be able to reach me via the posted email address, so I am sending you both my 2 cents via this note...


              Generally...
              - Limit access to the vehicle.
              - Periodically 'rent' a dealership mechanic and bay, and have that person perform a physical inspection. Dealership mechanics are a cheap and effective alternative to me.


              Detection...
              - For the devices that communicate via cell phone, a cell phone detector in the vehicle. (http://tinyurl.com/948g5)
              - For devices which only record: a physical inspection, and surveillance on the vehicle to see if anyone comes to 'service' the device.


              Hope that helps!
              Kevin


              Kevin D. Murray - CPP, CFE, BCFE
              Murray Associates
              Eavesdropping Detection and
              Counterespionage Consultants
              to Business & Government
              http://www.spybusters.com

              Enjoy the day,
              Bill

              Comment

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