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can a person be too honest

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  • can a person be too honest

    Where I use to work, we had an installer, he was doing an install at a residence. The lady was real religious, had bibles and crosses everywhere. The installer finished the job, and the lady asked about getting another few windows done, the installer told her it would be 50.00 a window , she asked him if he could do better, he said he couldn't, that was the set price. Then he told her 50.00 cash he would do the three windows. She agreed and all was good. Then three weeks later the born again christian lady came to our company to pay the extra 100.00, because she didn't feel right about it. Then of course the installer lost his job.

  • #2
    Unfortunately thieves abound in all type of businesses.
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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    • #3
      It used to be common practice for alarm technicians to do "side jobs" for customers at night and on the weekends. As most technicians had take-home trucks, they would most often use take their company truck to the private alarm installation job that they were doing on the side. While the technician would most often buy the major system components (control panel, etc.), they would think nothing of using their employer's tools and supplies (contact switches, wire, fasteners, etc.) to perform their private installation.

      Many alarm companies instituted policies banning "side jobs" and/or stopped letting their technicians take their trucks home for this reason. But I suspect that the practice is still going on in one form or another.
      Michael A. Silva
      Silva Consultants

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Silva Consultants View Post
        It used to be common practice for alarm technicians to do "side jobs" for customers at night and on the weekends. As most technicians had take-home trucks, they would most often use take their company truck to the private alarm installation job that they were doing on the side. While the technician would most often buy the major system components (control panel, etc.), they would think nothing of using their employer's tools and supplies (contact switches, wire, fasteners, etc.) to perform their private installation.

        Many alarm companies instituted policies banning "side jobs" and/or stopped letting their technicians take their trucks home for this reason. But I suspect that the practice is still going on in one form or another.
        Yup. I knew a guy had his own business and ran it side-by-side with his "real" job. Carried a magnetic sign he slipped over the company decal. Got away with it for several years until he was sitting in a coffee shop with his boss and one of his "side" customers came up and started talking to him about something he wanted done. Whoops!

        Oh, did I mention that the supervision at his "real" job was somewhat lax?
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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        • #5
          Contractors who accept cash to avoid taxes is a widespread problem here. It also allows them to underbid the honest person who must include the tax when determining a fair fee for his service. I'm glad the installer got canned.

          Do you realize how much money could be saved if everyone was honest? Think about it.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
            Do you realize how much money could be saved if everyone was honest? Think about it.
            I'd rather not. I'd probably be unemployed.
            "I don't do judgment. Just retrieval."

            "The true triumph of reason is that it enables us to get along with those who do not possess it."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by darkenna View Post
              I'd rather not. I'd probably be unemployed.
              Security includes other functions such as fire control, crowd control, preventing water damage, safety inspections, first aid, etc. You could still be employed as one.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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              • #8
                Lots of cops work private security gigs in their PSA while on duty and in service in a PSA. Its nearly the same exact same thing ... and of course if you get caught, there will be hell to pay.

                PSA = Patrol Service Area (think precinct or sector)
                Washington DC

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
                  Security includes other functions such as fire control, crowd control, preventing water damage, safety inspections, first aid, etc. You could still be employed as one.
                  Mr. Security I think there are a lot on this forum that do not realize this. They claim not to be Want-a-bees but think that Private Securty is actually Private Policing.
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
                    Security includes other functions such as fire control, crowd control, preventing water damage, safety inspections, first aid, etc. You could still be employed as one.
                    Mr. Darkenna works in retail loss prevention.
                    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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                    • #11
                      That lady was stupid. Stupid people should be illegal.
                      Washington DC

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
                        Mr. Darkenna works in retail loss prevention.
                        No problem. "Clean up in isle 2 please"
                        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
                          Mr. Security I think there are a lot on this forum that do not realize this. They claim not to be Want-a-bees but think that Private Securty is actually Private Policing.

                          Yep...you hit the nail...or seal...you pick, right on the head

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
                            Mr. Darkenna works in retail loss prevention.
                            Indeed... and most of my time these days is spent investigating intentional violations of policy and procedure. My guess is that if everyone was honest, my industry would be somewhere in the vicinity of 90% unemployed, with the last 10% being solely on the hunt of operational error.

                            They wouldn't keep us to clean the aisles... they already have people for that.
                            "I don't do judgment. Just retrieval."

                            "The true triumph of reason is that it enables us to get along with those who do not possess it."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
                              Mr. Security I think there are a lot on this forum that do not realize this. They claim not to be Want-a-bees but think that Private Securty is actually Private Policing.
                              Actually, when "policing" is properly understood, you'll find that security is exactly "private policing" in the private space, with precise parallels to many of the duties that are routinely performed by the government police in the public space, the majority of which have nothing to do with enforcing laws, incidentally. (the police spend less than 30% of their time enforcing laws).

                              This has nothing to do with what you think are "wanna-be's" or the "common" use of the word "police" by the lay public, which is inaccurate. Policing is also not necessarily related to "government authority". Policing refers to the specific activities of maintaining order, protecting life and property, assessing threats and investigating adverse incidents, whether it's done in the public or the private space, and whether it's done under government authority or the authority of the entity that controls the private space in question.

                              That's why you'll find that private security is referred to in many academic journal articles and scholarly books written by respected authors in the field of private security as exactly that - "private policing", such as this one: The Rebirth of Private Policing, which is a discussion of the shift in policing to the private space.

                              Here's an abstract of an academic thesis entitled The Evolving Status of Private Policing.

                              And here's a law library article discussing public versus private policing. This particular author specifically states in his opening sentence that he uses "private security" and "private police" interchangeably.

                              This was a very famous study prepared for the federal government: Private Police in the United States - two volumes.

                              Here's an article from the Institute of Economic Affairs entitled (it's a mouthful): Theft in the Market: An Economic Analysis of Costs and Incentives in Improving Prevention by Government and Private Police In Reducing Loss. You'll find books like The Law and Private Police by James Kakalik and Private Policing by Mark Button. In Jones & Newburn's Plural Policing: A Comparative Perspective, you'll find the definition of policing as any "organized form of order maintenance, peacekeeping, rule OR law enforcement, crime investigation and prevention..." (page 3), and the book goes on to examine the relationship of policing in the public and private space, which the authors call "plural policing". In fact, many private police are working in the public space, employed by government, and have worked in the quasi-public space for many years. The distinction, frankly, is blurring and will continue to do so.

                              I could list many more examples (the professional literature is bulging with such references), but you can Google the exact phrases "private police" and "private policing", and you'll begin to see what I'm talking about. What you'll discover is that the vast majority of the policing that is done in this country is done by the private police, popular misconceptions notwithstanding. Remember, most of the public think that electric power companies are "public utilities", too, when in fact most of them are private enterprises. Even the US Postal Service is now quasi-privatised but people still think it's a government agency. Don't get your definitions from the public.
                              Last edited by SecTrainer; 06-10-2008, 12:29 AM.
                              "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                              "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                              "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                              "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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