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alarm companies witout ethics

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  • sideshow
    started a topic alarm companies witout ethics

    alarm companies witout ethics

    I see this all to often in our industry, they sell these packages that include 2 doors or 1 motion and sign them up to a contract for monitering there junk for years. They made a sale, but how much protection did they get for 35.00 a month? and if there panel goes bad for an extra 10.00 a month maintenance fee and adding an extra couple years to their contract they will replace it. Then the stand alone, out of a box, plug into a phone jack systems. and the simple fact that nobody gets cellular or radio back-ups is beyond me, you cut the phone line and no signals are sent, I worked as a tech and I told so many people about features they didn't even know they had, like ambush, panic, stay mode etc. sometimes they weren't even programmed. I hate seeing people taken advantage of, I turned down a job that would have made me good money, because I felt the customer would be getting a subgrade product that offered little to no protection. What are your thoughts on these practices?
    Last edited by sideshow; 05-29-2008, 08:16 PM.

  • vedard
    replied
    People should learn to DIY their home security systems

    I think people should learn to install and program their home security systems and monitor their home by themselves.
    It is not so hard to install home alarm systems especially with wireless alarm systems. The alarm systems are consisted by panel, PIR detector, door contact, outdoor PIR only and maybe perimeter beam etc.
    Manufacturers always provide detailed user's manual to guide how to install and program.
    Anyway, the products cost will be very lower than monitor cost.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrlocks
    replied
    Everybody is trying to make good money and if customer is unaware of facilities then this will be a big advantage for the companies. I think there should be some steps for that and before selling the products customer should be given all the information related to any products.

    Leave a comment:


  • IP-Alarms
    replied
    The door knocking companies claim to be doing around 20,000 of these systems per month, so it's still big business. No room for ethics here.

    When you have pushed things a little too far and had a little too much bad press, you simply do what APX did - change your company name. Off they go again, squeaky clean.....

    Leave a comment:


  • StarSecurity83
    replied
    I think these practices are horrible, frankly. My wife worked for one of these places, for about two weeks. Not only were they praying on old people and not setting up the systems, but they were also screwing the employees. The best part of not offering the customers any technical support AFTER selling it to them. I always loved that.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    Birddog, I partially disagree with you. The $99 special isn't just to get their foot in the door. It's all they want to do. The money for them is made on the monitoring. They would rather get in and get out as fast as they can, with no desire to provide real security.

    I know of instances where they told a prospect that "you only need to protect the doors, they only break in that way"; when they were called because the screen was cut and entry was gained through the window. I got that job. I have another where they essentially said the same thing, when you walked past 4 dining room windows, single hung, bottom about 2 feet off the ground to get to the front door. The house was on a steep hillside, 3 stories. I put in a $3000 + system.

    I too, convert a lot of these accounts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Birddog Bob
    replied
    Correcting the $99 package Pushers !

    The spirit of $99 package offering was intended to be a consumer attention grabber and a base price for the security consultant to get his/her foot in the door and push for upgrades, as well as, contractually handcuff a consumer to an expensive monitoring commitment. Too often many in the industry sell to the wallet instead of the mind to a consumer who has champagne taste but a Budweiser budget for security. In looking at the big picture these low cost offerings were/are profitable for the Majors in the long term regarding return on investment (about 10 years ago when with the “Evil 3 Lettered Company” the office’s general manager in a managerial sermon explained the payback for their dealer program was 29 months out. Frankly that leaves a window of 7 months for unmolested profit with their $30+ RMR price point till the contract normally ends). In grasping this scenario now - I LOVE IT! After the fulfillment of these handcuffing contacts , I can roll in with one of my low cost/quality monitoring offerings and convert the account! Additionally, I can also profit by pushing for security enhancing upgrades which should have been in place from the start! http://www.birddogrocks.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Birddog Bob
    replied
    Correcting the ethically challenged who push $99 packages!

    The spirit of $99 package offering was intended to be a consumer attention grabber and a base price for the security consultant to get his/her foot in the door and push for upgrades, as well as, contractually handcuff a consumer to an expensive monitoring commitment. Too often many in the industry sell to the wallet instead of the mind to a consumer who has champagne taste but a Budweiser budget for security. In looking at the big picture these low cost offerings were/are profitable for the Majors in the long term regarding return on investment (about 10 years ago when with the “Evil 3 Lettered Company” the office’s general manager in a managerial sermon explained the payback for their dealer program was 29 months out. Frankly that leaves a window of 7 months for unmolested profit with their $30+ RMR price point till the contract normally ends). In grasping this scenario now - I LOVE IT! After the fulfillment of these handcuffing contacts , I can roll in with one of my low cost/quality monitoring offerings and convert the account! Additionally, I can also profit by pushing for security enhancing upgrades which should have been in place from the start! http://www.birddogrocks.com

    Leave a comment:


  • GeneLitt
    replied
    Other than "prone to user error", how exactly do you talk down window contacts?
    It's easier than you might think. See the "slap 'em up" guys are afraid of doing any real work. When faced with *any* job, they would rather install one device than 12, so they talk down windows and say that the real security is in the motion detectors. It makes it cheaper (in every sense) and still covers the main parts of the house, they say. What they neglect to tell anyone is:
    a) motions are only good when you aren't around because they are disabled in "stay," and
    b) they only go off after someone has already gained access to your home.

    b is a huge thing for me. I sell security systems in an attempt to keep people out of a home, not have a loud noise start while they are already robbing a house.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    Agreed GeneLitt. When I have the opportunity to sell against them, I usually win. However, many people don't give you the opportunity. That's their loss as well as mine, and it's unfortunate. What's worse for me is the larger customers, when the decision is strictly numbers and bean counters. And with this OP, which is they lied (I know, that's open to interpretation, but mine is they lied) when they said it wasn't proprietary. Or they didn't deliver what was asked for.

    CameraMan, I have had at least 2 occasions where the ADT salesman told the customer "they never break in through the window". On 1 of these, the woman wanted an alarm for her daughters condo, because someone left the window next to the door unlocked, slit the screen, reached in and unlocked the door, and only took the cash that several people know about in her dresser. The other had a bay window with 4 single hungs about a foot off the ground, which you walked past to get to the front door. The first I sold for about $1500, the second for almost $3000. I didn't sell window contacts on the windows 15 feet up, or the one 3 stories straight up. I told them it happens, but was highly unlikely. I actually like when they say things like that. It helps my credibility.
    Last edited by integrator97; 06-26-2008, 04:11 PM.

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  • Rooney
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    Other than "prone to user error", how exactly do you talk down window contacts?
    One example in Arizona here. We have very electrically active monsoon rains here. Contacts are prone to siezing with a local lightning strike. If the window was closed when the lightning struck the contact will not set off the alarm when it is opened, vice-versa if the window was open the customer would have to bypass that zone to arm the system.

    If installing an alarm in an area that is well know for lightning activity I ussualy will use glass breaks and motions instead. Of course it depends on the client. I will explain to the client the differences of the components and costs associated with them. If they go with the contacts I will instruct them on how to replace them and will ussualy give them a few extra. That is taking into account the customer actually tests their system monthly and after a storm like instructed and finds a bad contact.

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    Other than "prone to user error", how exactly do you talk down window contacts?

    Leave a comment:


  • GeneLitt
    replied
    I have had success noting to people that that my security systems have the full perimeter and some partial interior and fire devices. When asked to match the system specs, the $99 is either twice my price (for a leased system) or spends a remarkable amount of time talking down window contacts. Or worse...he matches or beats my price, but somehow convinces the customer that the monitoring price goes up with every motion detector or smoke detector. When I have put these guys in a box like that, I have had pretty good success sending them to the curb.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    True John. But what gets my goat is that if the current occupant is not monitored, many of these companies won't even come out on a paid service call. If you put it in, you should support it. (assuming you are not owed money). Other wise they should state boldly in the contract that they will only service a monitored system. (not that it would ever happen).

    Leave a comment:


  • john_harrington
    replied
    As was noted above, in many cases the cost of the system was subsidized in order to get into the monitoring (recurring revenue) game. In some cases the system did what was promised, in others the sales person should have worked harder.

    The analogy I use is mobile phones- the phones do not cost what we buy them for (in some cases they are even free), but are subsidized by Cingular, Verizon etc as long as you sign a long term agreement.

    I think shoddy salesmanship and installations do not equate to the cost of the system. I have seen $1M plus systems that were poorly installed or did not have all of the features turned on.

    Leave a comment:

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