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  • Help with VOIP & Alarms

    Hi My name is Patrick and I am a installation manager for my families alarm company. We also have our own U.L.C.S. I having been having problems with Residential VOIP. I can DL the Panels but Can not get them to Communicate. Any help would be great. Thank you

  • #2
    That is a problem that alot of alarm companies face. It depends mainly on what VOIP service provider the client is using. The first thing that should be done is the alarm panel should be first in line for the phone system with the rest of the house (if only 1 line) coming out of the panel. Second, if the client is using Vonage for their VOIP, have them call Vonage and set the packetization level to 10. Then test the system again. Also if the system is calling a local number Vonage requires an 11 digit phone number. If you are still having problems, I recommend that the client put in a limited line. The cost is about $15 per month. PM me with your e-mail address and I can send you more detailed information.
    Last edited by Rooney; 02-12-2007, 08:13 PM. Reason: clarification

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    • #3
      I've heard nothing but problems running data traffic over consumer grade VoIP (managed by someone else, with a little Linksys ATA and stock settings at the provider.)
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        There are a number of potential compatibility issues and these can run all the way down to the codec and compression employed by different VOIP providers, which may or may not be compatible with the PacketCable standard, to improper wiring of the jacks, and even customers who are still on local POTS service while LD is back-hauled via VOIP.

        Depending on your company's inclinations, one longer-term solution, and one that offers a number of secondary benefits, is to become a VOIP provider yourself. There's nothing particularly technically challenging about this.

        Here's an article that may be of interest:

        VOIP and Alarms

        You might already know that NextAlarm (go to NextAlarm, click on "Products" in the menu toward the top of the page,and scroll down to the bottom of the next page) sells an "ABN Broadband/VOIP Adaptor" for alarm systems, although I'm not sure whether it can only be used with their monitoring program. Might be interesting to pick one up to look at, though....especially if you know anyone who happens to speak Chinese.

        Seems to me I heard that AT&T had also developed an interface box, but I can't dig that up now.
        Last edited by SecTrainer; 02-12-2007, 11:16 PM.
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rooney
          That is a problem that alot of alarm companies face. It depends mainly on what VOIP service provider the client is using. The first thing that should be done is the alarm panel should be first in line for the phone system with the rest of the house (if only 1 line) coming out of the panel. Second, if the client is using Vonage for their VOIP, have them call Vonage and set the packetization level to 10. Then test the system again.
          I hope the alarm panel isw always first and ahead of anything else on the phone line, regardless of VOIP, DSL, or standard analog POTS.

          I would not trust it, if changing the packetization level to 10 fixed it. You CANNOT depend on any utility to maintain non-standard settings. At some point it will be reset, whether on an equipment change out, or some other service. I would sell them in a radio or cellular type system. Remember, if they can cut the phone line, they cut DSL. And if they're smart, they'll cut the cable too. I know I would. Harder to cut cellular / radio.
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          Rocket Science
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          The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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          • #6
            VOIP Alarm monitoring

            ADI sells a product from a company called Vonatronix. The have a Linksys box that you put on ($99) that transmits the alarm to them, and they retransmit to your CC or they have a partner. It's $4 a month for that service, but you get some extras. O/C reports and latchkey included. They handle that at their end.

            Also, they are a VOIP provider, claim to be better and cheaper than Vonage, and, as they say, some of your customers are going that way anyway. Why not be the one to sell and install, and you get a $3 residual.

            Haven't used it yet, but I'm definitely going to look into it.
            sigpic
            Rocket Science
            Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


            http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
            One Man's Opinion

            The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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