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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by pascalwilli
    Hi Security.As a locksmith this information is very useful for my career.Thanks for sharing this info.

    Chicago Car Locksmith.
    Are you going to go through every post concerning locks & make insightful comments like this in everyone? Just to spam us?

    Leave a comment:


  • mrlocks
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock View Post
    Mr. Security:
    That is sound advice. No key or combination locking devices are pick or manipulation proof there are only degrees of pick and manipulation resistance. Should one decide on a padlock device ensure you understand the principles of shimming and rapping. If such a device is deemed necessary would it meet the standards contained in MIL-Spec 17-802 (current series) and insist on cam operated shackle heel and toe. Mortise and rim locks should be chosen for the application intended.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    I agree with you that picking is possible to each lock only some will be picked easily and some will take time and most of the time tricky to be picked.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Secret spuk View Post
    In my lmited experience... I've found that Burglers tend to be very professional, and also somewhat specialists. Hotel creepers tend to stick to hotels, window burglers tend to sneak in windows, Home invaders tend to stick to home invasion etc. One of the most interesting is the bubblegum burgler.

    I've also come across a host of unlikely burglers tools. A roll of black tape, Playing cards, store discount cards, A bristle from the brush of a street sweeping vehical, A big channel-lok pliers, and a big screw driver and of course... bubblegum. I am currently involved in an investigation of a series of burglaries. They use the same method that the police use to open doors. The police use a hydraulic jack, and air bag. This crew is using a 2X4, and a automobile jack.

    It's difficult to discuss some methods in an open forum. But I'd be very interested in hearing what other people have found burglars using as tools, and methods.

    Another thing I find interesting is... Burglars are the only criminal (in my experience) that actually plan for the arival or security, or police.


    Spuk

    ( sorry if I took it off topic)
    I don't know why it is but I haven't heard of any Hotel creepers in about 10 years. We had 1 that I caught so many times we used to say hello to each other when we saw each other on the street.

    Leave a comment:


  • Secret spuk
    replied
    In my lmited experience... I've found that Burglers tend to be very professional, and also somewhat specialists. Hotel creepers tend to stick to hotels, window burglers tend to sneak in windows, Home invaders tend to stick to home invasion etc. One of the most interesting is the bubblegum burgler.

    I've also come across a host of unlikely burglers tools. A roll of black tape, Playing cards, store discount cards, A bristle from the brush of a street sweeping vehical, A big channel-lok pliers, and a big screw driver and of course... bubblegum. I am currently involved in an investigation of a series of burglaries. They use the same method that the police use to open doors. The police use a hydraulic jack, and air bag. This crew is using a 2X4, and a automobile jack.

    It's difficult to discuss some methods in an open forum. But I'd be very interested in hearing what other people have found burglars using as tools, and methods.

    Another thing I find interesting is... Burglars are the only criminal (in my experience) that actually plan for the arival or security, or police.


    Spuk

    ( sorry if I took it off topic)

    Leave a comment:


  • Smart-guardian
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
    That's the bright side to this issue. Most criminals look for easy targets, i.e., unlocked or flimsy doors, windows, etc. Brute force is still the preferred method. Bump-keys are more likely to be employed by individuals with the hacker personality…they enjoy the challenge. Other candidates are professionals who want to avoid the appearance of forced entry.
    I agree with Mr.Security."Most criminals look for easy target!" Having a locked door or security system might prevent 90% crimes taking place. The other 10%?! You do need spent lots money to against.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I totally agree with you Mr. Security. Thanks for helpful updates

    Leave a comment:


  • Timelocksean
    replied
    bumping

    While key bumping is a real problem, I have been involved in security for a number of years now and before that my family owned a group of insurance companies. In all the years I've been around I have yet to encounter a claim where the root of the problem came from key bumping. Just going in through the roof or a window is easier and far more prevalent. For the most part we can only mitigate the problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • TonyWarne
    replied
    I am surprised that lockl picking is actually developing into a sport.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locksport

    I do some editing for DMOZ and we have been discussing a new category as some sites came to our attention, involving lockpicking, whereby contestants pick a range of locks in time trials. There are a considerable number of sites sprouting up.

    Leave a comment:


  • lisa wilson
    replied
    Hi


    I thought Mr. Security, bumping keys are not as much necessary, why go for so much expense?, use Rim Locks, and Padlocks (Like, Keyed Alike Padlocks, Masterkeyed Padlocks, Closed Shackle Padlocks, High Security Padlocks and many more.... )

    Leave a comment:


  • LOCKMAN
    replied
    Lock Bumpng

    Lock Bumping is not new. It has been practiced in Europe for years and has recently (3 or 4 years ago) been introduced to U.S.
    Many people consider lockpicking a hobby or sport. It's not nearly as effective nor as easy as most people think. I've seen demonstrations of all kinds of magic picks, guns even an electric model that looked like a modofied electric toothbrush. I saw one that was made from a battery powered electric scissors. The thing is.... every one of these demonstrations were done on locks that had been keyed to be easy to pick. The biggest factor in a plain old Kwikset or Schlage Classic being easy to pick is the tumbler combination. Also, any lock that has been keyed to a master system is going to be easier to pick. For every chamber that has a master chip, you have doubled the number of possible combination to clear the shearline, thus opening the lock. So when a 6 pin lock has a master chip in every chamber you will have 64 possible combinations. I could on and on but the short version is that "bumping" is no real threat to any quality, properly keyed lockset.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Sometimes you don't even need a bump key.

    http://www.capricorn.org/~akira/home...ick/index.html
    The (Formerly known as) MIT Guide to Lockpicking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by knotquiteawake
    I was really surprised when i first tried lock picking. Its tricky but not difficult to understand and try out.
    Also, i've been following the bump key method for over a year now. Its gained widespead use over in Europe. It wasn't until recently that American "mainstream" got wind of how seriously flawed 90% of all pin and tumbler locks are.
    Government has known about it for the past 25 years or longer. The military, Justice, FBI and some others have come to know and appreciate that fact. As most of know, not all makers have this device but each one does have US Senators and Congresspersons.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • knotquiteawake
    replied
    I was really surprised when i first tried lock picking. Its tricky but not difficult to understand and try out.
    Also, i've been following the bump key method for over a year now. Its gained widespead use over in Europe. It wasn't until recently that American "mainstream" got wind of how seriously flawed 90% of all pin and tumbler locks are.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    And if not through, around or over. Just like a safe has 6 sides, look at all possible entry possibilities.

    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    As Bill said, locks are there only to provide a degree of protection. If someone wants in, they'll get in. I had a jewellry dealer stay in a room with an electrinic lock on it. Someone knew he had his merchandise in the room. They simply smashed through the door. The lock stayed intact!

    We often have to physcially break into the room safes & safety deposit boxes when people loose keys. All it takes is a little physical effort. I can open my electronic locks by knowing where to drill.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Lock picking isn't a science, its an art. This is the first thing I learned when I started learning how to pick.

    Leave a comment:

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