Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Software and Ubuntu Linux

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Software and Ubuntu Linux

    I am a Captain with a security firm and I have been tasked with coming up with creative ideas. One idea I had was to migrate all computers to Ubuntu Linux however I am having quite a time trying to find software that is applicable for Ubuntu that can help with the security service in general.

  • #2
    Originally posted by cferguson4809 View Post
    I am a Captain with a security firm and I have been tasked with coming up with creative ideas. One idea I had was to migrate all computers to Ubuntu Linux however I am having quite a time trying to find software that is applicable for Ubuntu that can help with the security service in general.
    You don't necessarily have to restrict your search to "Ubuntu" apps. Generally speaking, you can at least try any Linux app as long as you can deal with the package manager that it uses (Ubuntu uses debian but the app might use PUP or LZM, for instance) and as long as you can also install all other elements that the app requires you to have in order to run. (Many apps come with a preinstall list of other apps, kernel mods, utilities, etc. a mile long.) Another option (sometimes) is to recompile the source code for Ubuntu.

    Addressing your main point, however, I'd say this: Switching to Linux (from Windows, I presume?) can be a "destructive" idea just as easily as a "creative" one. It's still rather unusual to run Linux on workstations, desktops, laptops, MDTs, etc., and the probable future need for integration of mobile wireless devices would make it even more problematic. On the other hand, it's not at all unusual to run Linux on certain servers while the workforce uses Windows. Even so, I'm not sure that a small-to-midsize company would not (overall) do better with something like a Sharepoint setup, even with the upfront cost. It's something that really does require expert analysis to avoid making an enormous bungle. What looks great on a superficial level can be disastrous. At the end of the day, you have to be reasonably certain that whatever you do will best serve the business needs of your company - meaning, in simple terms, that this is the most efficient, cost-effective way for people to get their work done.

    So I think the main question is: Why is this a good idea for your company?

    ...and the second question is: How will this help your people serve your clients? We don't tend to think of "infrastructure" issues in light of our customers (believing "Why should they care"?) - but clients can be impacted by infrastructure decisions either directly or indirectly. Also, most of the drive for "new ideas" in any company (and the money it spends on them) should be directed to making improvements in employee performance (efficiency, accuracy, effectiveness, etc.) and improvements in serving clients and/or enabling the business to serve new clients. Otherwise, changes in the infrastructure could be the tail wagging the dog.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 06-28-2011, 11:06 AM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

    Comment

    Leaderboard

    Collapse
    Working...
    X