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50 percent growth for IP video sales

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  • #16
    Nvr/dvr

    Gentlemen,

    I sell a low cost NVR solution, I can provide a turn key system or simply provide software. The software is mature, first install of an analog solution 15+ years ago. the product is know as VIP (Video Image Processing).

    Core software is less than $600 and camera license (one time cost) is less than $100. I also have a nice 4 port encoder and a PT, no "Z" IP Dome camera with IR ring for $300. The software is written by Stanley and is distributed in the US by CT&T, www.cttus.com. I can be reached at 973-663-1960. If you would like a demo, give me a call.

    J.C.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jcolgan1 View Post
      Gentlemen,

      I sell a low cost NVR solution, I can provide a turn key system or simply provide software. The software is mature, first install of an analog solution 15+ years ago. the product is know as VIP (Video Image Processing).

      Core software is less than $600 and camera license (one time cost) is less than $100. I also have a nice 4 port encoder and a PT, no "Z" IP Dome camera with IR ring for $300. The software is written by Stanley and is distributed in the US by CT&T, www.cttus.com. I can be reached at 973-663-1960. If you would like a demo, give me a call.

      J.C.

      J.C. -- for future reference, please keep the product pitches out of these discussions unless someone is specifically asking for a product recommendation. You are welcome to announce your products in the "Vendors Forums".

      Geoff Kohl, administrator
      SecurityInfoWatch.com

      Comment


      • #18
        In my experience it isn't finding knowlegable installers or the limitations of the cameras that hinders IP surveillance sales, but everything that happens post-installation. IP solutions work great for companies with an IT staff, but for a liquor store owner or a soccer mom, it's just not user-friendly enough. These clients want a box that they can just turn on and have it work, which is what a stand-alone DVR offers.

        However, I am seeing more and more pre-boxed NVR solutions that are either Linux-based or using Windows Embedded. As these turn-key solutions become more and more friendly and stable, I think we'll see a rise in popularity.
        Mark McPherson
        PolarisUSA Video - Developer
        www.PolarisUSA.com - Security cameras for all applications.

        Comment


        • #19
          I think that you all have made some valid points concerning the IP vs Analog camera's but what difference do you foresee with the economy. Will this cause a setback in the dispersal of IP systems? Yes the CCTV installers and integrators will have to step up and learn the IT phase and vice versa, these are exciting times.

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          • #20
            Yes, I would expect a slow-down in the market uptick for IP video. Sales numbers from top IP video camera companies confirm this. That said, the growth is still really strong, and when people start building new facilities/buildings when market picks up for commercial construction (when they can find lenders again...), I think we'll be further and further into this network connected world and an IP connected system will almost be a de facto choice. In the meantime, though, I think people who are buying such things will be more likely to go with cheaper and tried/true.

            I know our other members have thoughts on this. Cameraman? Integrator97? Rooney? What are you seeing in sales? What's the change been in a slower economy?

            /SIW/Geoff

            p.s. Rick, hop on the introductions forum and tell us about yourself...helps us build the community.

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            • #21
              On big new construction projects, there is typically a one-to-two year design phase, and another one-to-two year construction phase, so it can be two-to-four years from the time that an owner decides to build a new facility, and when the order for new security equipment is placed. So generally, when the economy takes a downturn, it takes at least a couple of years for it to have an impact on the sales of equipment for new projects. The reverse is also true; when the economy picks up, it takes time for this to have a positive impact on security equipment sales.

              Retrofit and replacement projects are of course more discretionary, and an economic downturn will probably cause many customers to cancel or delay certain projects until the economic outlook becomes clearer.

              In my mind, there are two other conditions that may have a greater impact on the security equipment market, including the demand for IP cameras. First, there has been a tremendous amount of security equipment bought over the last five years or so, much in the name of "homeland security" and often funded by government grants. In my opinion, this market is now somewhat saturated, and it is doubtful that we will see the same level of spending over the next five years that we have seen over the past five years. (I have questioned the value of much of this spending in the first place, but that's the topic for another post. )

              Second, there has been a significant amount of spending in recent years as customers moved from VCRs to DVRs/NVRs and made their CCTV systems more network friendly by using IP cameras and/or upgrading to IP transport devices such as encoders and decoders. I think that many of the major end-users who have immediate plans to go in this direction have already done so, and therefore don't see a huge surge in upgrades over the next several years. Others who are using existing analog systems will upgrade to IP, but I think that this will occur slowly as equipment needs replacing rather than all at one time.

              To be sure, the security equipment marketplace will hold up better than many other segments of the economy, but security manufacturers probably aren't going to see the same level of growth that they did in the recent past.
              Last edited by Silva Consultants; 10-09-2008, 01:03 AM.
              Michael A. Silva
              Silva Consultants

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              • #22
                So why is there any analog sales at all?

                For the same old reason that some providers still want to sell conventional fire panels and burglar alarms.

                Provers like people are slow to change, slow to adapt, often fearful of newer technologies and sometimes just simply set in there ways.

                Even when the new technologies offer better solutions, faster installs, less service issues after install and additional RMR streams... there are those who will have nothing to do with change, it's as if the last ship has left the pier and they're standing there haggling over the price of the ticket.

                Another way of putting it, we as an industry are constantly voicing are distain for the customer's obsession with price!

                But what we don't see is the fact that more often than not this obsession over price is imposed on the customer by the providers themselves.

                Here's how this comes about in the world of burglar alarms package but it's not at all limited to just the burglar alarm market...

                When a customer seeks a quote in our industry, they may often call as many as 10 or 12 would be providers straight out of yellow pages. However, the customer will be lucky to get 6 providers to show up and quote. Many will want to give the client what I call a "yellow pad quote" or a fast, down and dirty quickly quote.

                The result of this type of marketing practice is that 5 out of the 6 quotes, if not all, will all feature a Honeywell or like minded manufacturers product... thus the providers have driven the customer to make their buy selection on the only remaining factor between the providers...Price!

                Now if the customer is really lucky one and only one will be different and will stand out from the mob... in those cases 90% of the time the customer will buy difference over price!

                People are people and providers are providers.

                Just a through or two...

                Rick therepguy
                Houston

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                • #23
                  Sounds like there confustion between IP Camers and mega-pixical Cameras

                  Sounds like there is confusion between IP based cameras and IP based Mega-Pixical Cameras...

                  The current and last trend in the industry is away from the typical IP based camera and too the IP based Mega-Pixical Cameras and yes I rep one.

                  As of this reading if your guys aren't out there pushing IP based Mega-Pixical Cameras you're doing a disservice to your customer/client.

                  The different are night and day.

                  One more thing...

                  Anything less than 3 megpixels is no longer expectable.

                  3 megpixels is good

                  5 or 6 megapixels are best

                  Anything higher than 5 is generally overkill...save a hand full of special applications that are to few to list but you''ll know them should you come across one such application, I.E homeland security.

                  Also mate high end or special function lens to these cameras better yet buy the camera sets as a complete systems... I.E straight plug and play out of the box.

                  Again just a through or two

                  Later

                  Rick therepguy
                  Houston

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                  • #24
                    I think that saying all cameras should be IP-based megapixel cameras is a grave oversimplification.

                    The first question that any end-user should ask is: are cameras the right solution in the first place? In my opinion, video surveillance is one of the most overprescribed "solutions" in security today. I would say that at least half of the cameras installed don't provide any real security value. This situation often comes about when an end-user is experiencing a security problem, such as vandalism in the parking lots, and says "I know, I'll put up cameras!", instead of taking a more balanced approach to security.

                    Cameras are rarely the first thing that should be done to improve security, and never the only thing that should be done to improve security, but most end-users who are uneducated in security don't know that. Often times changing security procedures, providing employee awareness training, improving lighting, modifying landscaping or fencing, etc. are far better solutions to the problem than installing cameras. Many people selling camera systems don't want to tell the end-user this for fear of losing a sale.

                    Once it has been determined that installing cameras is the right solution, then the objectives of the system need to be precisely defined by asking the following questions: what I am trying to capture?, what level of detail do I need?, what amount of light is available in the areas that I intend to view, will the images be watched on a real-time basis or recorded?, how do I intend to use the recorded images?, how long to I need to retain the recorded images?, what resources do I have in terms of bandwidth and storage capacity?, and many others. Once these questions have been answered, you can then begin to figure out the number of cameras and placement locations, types of lenses needed, image resolution needed, number of frames per second that needs to be recorded, etc.

                    Only then can you make decisions as to whether or not to go IP/analog, traditional camera or megapixel, etc. and develop precise specifications for the overall system.
                    Michael A. Silva
                    Silva Consultants

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Not trying to spam the site, but here at my company we help people get into the IP world from Analog. Our vendors are willing to get you the info so that you have a case to go IP for your customers, because IP is real and you need to jump on board early. You can check out some of our recorded webinars to learn more. PM if you are interested in learning how we can help you out.

                      http://www.wavonline.com/eventsnews/webseminars.html

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                      • #26
                        - well, now you've dug up the thread - it's an interesting topic so why not see if/how things have changed in the last 12 months.

                        I've been keeping a keen eye on the development of IP cameras for around 4 years now and I can't speak for commercial cameras, but certainly for the residential market, the current group of manufacturers have missed a great opportunity to design a great product at a keen price and take a firm hold on the marketplace.

                        I remember when burglar alarm PIR detectors first arrived on the scene many moons ago and there were two manufacturers that made great products and everybody used either one or the other. They were of a high quality build available at a reasonable price to the trade. It was very difficult for others to get in and break the grip they had and they had a good run for a few years.

                        I run a vendor neutral IP Camera monitoring platform and my job is to get hold of as many IP cameras as I can, read through the software developer kit (if I'm lucky) and see what they are made of.

                        Some come with a setup CD that you have to install so that you can see the thing on a PC. They go straight back - or in the trash. Others are unable to obtain an IP address via DHCP - so they are as good as DOA.

                        The majority are usually OK - during daylight hours at least. I then have to start triggering the cameras to make sure that snapshots, FTP, SMTP, pre and post alarm, video clips, motion detection and other features function OK. Sadly they don't on a lot of cameras

                        Like most other companies working with IP Cameras, they always seem to narrow support down to Axis, Panasonic and Sony. Axis and Sony are quite pricey and only a small number of models of Panasonic cameras are available at the sub $100 barrier that needs to be broken for serious entry into the residential sector.

                        So, my summary as of today is that Axis seem to dominate the mid range market, there are plenty of good cameras to choose from at the high end, but the sub $100 market is riddled with _?># from China. The Panasonic kit is not getting the traction it deserves.

                        I'm looking into the Y-Cam, but does anyone know of anything else that deserves to stand out in the low end residential market ?
                        IP Alarms

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by IP-Alarms View Post
                          I'm looking into the Y-Cam, but does anyone know of anything else that deserves to stand out in the low end residential market ?
                          ACTi, maybe. Also, Sanyo is coming out with a line of megapixel cameras that will be, shall we say, much much cheaper than the equivalent Axis megapixel cameras (more appropriate for budget commercial than home use, I'll admit).
                          The CCTV Blog.

                          "Expert" is something like "leader". It's not a title that you can ever claim for yourself no matter what you might know or might have done. It's a title that others bestow on you based on their assessment of what you know and what you have done.

                          -SecTrainer

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                          • #28
                            Anyone familiar with Avigilon? The make megapixel cameras. One of my reps was in here the other day to demo a few. A 1, 5 and 16 megapixel. I was impressed, but don't really have anything to compare it to.

                            One thing people often forget or don't know, is that most IP cameras don't offer any better performance than traditional cameras. They don't realize IP does not equal megapixels or better resolution. IP cameras are capable of having more, but most do not.

                            What's the longest people are realistically storing at what megapixels? In other words, is anyone storing 16 meagapixels at 10ips for any length of time?

                            And when you get in the 5+ megapixels, is there still compression techniques? Does h.264 or anything work on that?
                            Last edited by integrator97; 10-19-2009, 12:17 PM.
                            sigpic
                            Rocket Science
                            Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                            http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                            One Man's Opinion

                            The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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                            • #29
                              Sorry, but I didn't see Integrator's post. I'll respond now.

                              Two points. First, storage is cheap now. We aren't doing our best to optimise a T-160 tape to record 16 cameras for a week, nowadays. Hard drives cost nothing. Imagine an intelligent RAID 0 16TB managed hard drive array for under $2,800 (commerical link)? You can run 32 Q1755 cameras for over a week (assuming H.264 compression and event based recording at 50% event occurances) according to my Axis storage calculator, with full redundant backup- 3 weeks if you go RAID 1.

                              Second, if you have a much, much larger system (say a multi-site campus), there exist alternatives that will do intelligent backups. A friend of mine works for TimeSight Systems, which assumes that you'll know about most critical events right away. Therefore, video from yesterday needs to be reccorded at 30FPS at 3MP, but stuff from last week can safely be stored at 15FPS and at 1.3MP, stuff from lat month can be stored at 7FPS and VGA, and so on. Supposedly, they will be announcing some major wins in the next month or so, mostly involving municipal surveillance systems.
                              The CCTV Blog.

                              "Expert" is something like "leader". It's not a title that you can ever claim for yourself no matter what you might know or might have done. It's a title that others bestow on you based on their assessment of what you know and what you have done.

                              -SecTrainer

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hello. I am most definitely looking to make a move with my career. I have a MS in Applied Information Technology, and looking to take more classes. I would eventually like to get my CISSP and move up in the ranks. There are many U.S. companies hiring in D.C. currently at the moment. Does any one know where others in the U.S. are hiring?

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