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  • Wireless Signal Mapper

    If you're deploying wireless systems, this site signal mapper software from Tamosoft might be of real benefit to you. (Tamosoft, incidentally, is a well-established, well-respected software company that has been developing network analysis tools for many years.)

    http://www.tamos.com/products/wifi-site-survey/

    Be sure to watch the video. It uses a fairly simple small-business situation for purposes of illustration, but the software can handle very large installations.

    Basically, you install this on your wifi-enabled notebook. Then, draw up a site diagram (which you have to scan in to your computer, of course) or you can use a third-party drawing application that you might already be using. The software will automatically identify your access points. You just have to take one measurement (e.g., the length of one wall) to establish the scale of your site diagram in the application.

    Then you simply walk the site with the notebook on which this software is installed, recording signal properties at specific points along the way. After doing so, the software will provide you with a host of information about the signal strength, S/N ratio, interference between access points (AP's), areas that don't meet signal requirements that you want, etc. With this information, you can get a pretty good idea of where you need to move or add access points, etc. in order to achieve maximum performance. And of course, you can try different configurations, re-doing the survey to verify you're actually solving problems rather than creating them.

    It can then output the results in a really professional-looking analysis report with full graphics (assuming you have a color printer) that I'm sure will impress your clients!

    At $500 it's not intended to be a tool for the public to analyze their home networks, but for professionals it's less expensive than some of the other tools you use in your business, I'm sure.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 11-17-2010, 12:10 PM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

  • #2
    Do you think it would work to sniff out unauthorized access points. For example a second wireless network trying to access your building?

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    • #3
      Listening for Rogue APs can be done for free, using netstumbler. Even if a AP is set to not broadcast its SSID, its still going to transmit and other radios will hear it. I have netstumbler-like thing for my iphone and routinely find hidden access points though that app.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        Netstumbler will not find an AP that is not currently in use if it is not broadcasting its SSID (or configured not to respond to a beacon with an empty SSID string - or "ANY" request). Technically, setting up an AP this way is a violation of the 802.11 standard, but folks do it all the time, for obvious reasons.
        Last edited by SecTrainer; 11-17-2010, 07:24 PM.
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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        • #5
          Problem is, if the radio isn't transmitting and its not doing anything on the network itself (ARP table requests, etc), then only a physical search will find it. If you've got someone doing burst transmissions once a day or something insane, then you may need to drop a laptop with an airpcap or two, and let it listen for 24-48 hours.

          But, if you're having to resort to an extended survey, you might need to start thinking like a signals intelligence specialist. :|
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #6
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
            Problem is, if the radio isn't transmitting and its not doing anything on the network itself (ARP table requests, etc), then only a physical search will find it. If you've got someone doing burst transmissions once a day or something insane, then you may need to drop a laptop with an airpcap or two, and let it listen for 24-48 hours.

            But, if you're having to resort to an extended survey, you might need to start thinking like a signals intelligence specialist. :|
            Nate - for the type of scenario you describe, how about a laptop running Kismet or something passive like that?
            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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            • #7
              Currently we pay a company @$4, 000 to have 2 people walk through our building for an hour, and tell use if there is any non-company WiFi signals originating from within the building.

              It would be nice to do these sweeps in-house.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scott View Post
                Currently we pay a company @$4, 000 to have 2 people walk through our building for an hour, and tell use if there is any non-company WiFi signals originating from within the building.

                It would be nice to do these sweeps in-house.
                And I would imagine that at such $ rates you don't have these sweeps done very often, either. Be aware that the whole field of TSCM is littered with charlatans, fakes and amateurs running "sweeps" with cheap inadequate gear and methods, and with zero to little training.

                It's important to understand the limitation of what a sweep like this can actually tell you, which is something very narrow, like: "Our site sweep, conducted using [equipment, method and software listed here], detected no unauthorized wireless signals during the period of 1300 to 1400 hrs on 11/18/10." That's it. That's the most this kind of sweep can reveal.

                Unfortunately, there's a tendency to "overinterpret" the results to mean that there are no rogue wifi devices present, which a sweep like this absolutely does not guarantee - or that a different methodology would have revealed their signals.

                Also, the manner in which the sweep is conducted (including the operational security surrounding the sweep) can easily cause even this limited amount of useful information to be compromised. For instance, IT people are very commonly the culprits in setting up rogue devices, and yet they're also the ones who know all about a sweep that's going to be conducted.

                In other words, this kind of a sweep is probably giving you bupkus and you'd probably be as well off to load up Netstumbler (or Ministumbler on a Pocket PC is actually even better for this sort of thing logistically) and do your own random, frequent and unannounced sweeps. Better yet, you can also implement a passive listening station or two running something like Kismet, which is also free. What's most important is that all of this is done with the utmost OPSEC in mind.
                Last edited by SecTrainer; 11-20-2010, 09:37 AM.
                "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                Comment


                • #9
                  sometime i got slow speed and i notis that its happened when all wifi were working in my surrounding. is it due to signal interference??
                  Arran
                  _____________
                  Chicago office cleaning | Chicago janitorial services

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