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  • Different ratings

    We just received some new 5 lbs ABC fire extinguishers. They have a 3A:40BC rating. Our old 5 lbs ABC extingusihers had 3A:10BC ratings. Anyone know why the difference?
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

  • #2
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    We just received some new 5 lbs ABC fire extinguishers. They have a 3A:40BC rating. Our old 5 lbs ABC extingusihers had 3A:10BC ratings. Anyone know why the difference?
    Hotel,

    One of my duties here is to inspect the fire extinguishers. Ours vary in sizes from 5lb to 20lb cans, they are ABC, and we're just phasing out the old cartridge units. The numbers appear to be what material class it can extinguish & chemical composition according to the article below.


    The rating system for portable fire extinguishers can be very confusing. It is based on the types of fire, i.e., A;B;C;D;or K. When testing began long ago, labs used a 3'x3'x3' "crib" of loosely stacked wood. If a fire extinguisher and a trained operator could extinguish this crib of wood when fully involved with fire, it received a 1A rating. To visualize higher ratings, just multiply the volume of the "cribbed" wood stack. A 5 to 6 pound dry chemical extinguisher is rated at 2 or 3A depending on its chemical mixture. All other things being equal, a 4A rated extinguisher should be able to extinguish twice as much fire as a 2A rated extinguisher. Remember: this is in a lab with a trained operator !
    The standard rating for flammable and combustible liquids is 1 square foot of surface area of a "pooled" liquid at an appreciable depth (1/4" or more). Liquids will always seek a lower place, so they will always attempt to "pool" and therefore contain themselves. Liquids that are unconfined pose a greater risk, and are referred to as "three-dimensional" spills. The rating for one unit (1'x1') is 1B. The smallest B:C type extinguishers (2 to 3 lb.) have a 5 to 10B rating. All other things being equal, an extinguisher rated 40B should be twice as effective as one rated 20B.

    There is no standard rating for Class C and Class D fires. When a Class C fire is de-energized, it is treated as a Class A or B type.

    Class D fires burn ferociously, they may burn in the absence of air, and they are highly reactive to water. These fires must be completely covered with a compatible agent to at least 1/4" to 1/2", or more.

    Class K fire extinguishers (6-liter) are rated 2A:1B:C:K. Although this doesn't seem like a lot, these extinguishers are specially formulated to be compatible with most commercial restaurant hood fire suppression systems, and they can certainly be used at home. They offer easier clean-up and less down-time after use.


    http://www.iflss.net/fire%20Extinguishers.htm#The rating system
    Last edited by UnsupervisedCanadian; 03-14-2014, 06:25 AM. Reason: Punctuation turned into Smilies
    World's Youngest Grumpy Old Man

    AF&AM

    Opinions expressed in my posts are mine alone and do not reflect those of my employer, the client, or SIW Forums (unless specifically stated for moderation purposes)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by UnsupervisedCanadian View Post
      Hotel,

      One of my duties here is to inspect the fire extinguishers. Ours vary in sizes from 5lb to 20lb cans, they are ABC, and we're just phasing out the old cartridge units. The numbers appear to be what material class it can extinguish & chemical composition according to the article below.


      The rating system for portable fire extinguishers can be very confusing. It is based on the types of fire, i.e., A;B;C;D;or K. When testing began long ago, labs used a 3'x3'x3' "crib" of loosely stacked wood. If a fire extinguisher and a trained operator could extinguish this crib of wood when fully involved with fire, it received a 1A rating. To visualize higher ratings, just multiply the volume of the "cribbed" wood stack. A 5 to 6 pound dry chemical extinguisher is rated at 2 or 3A depending on its chemical mixture. All other things being equal, a 4A rated extinguisher should be able to extinguish twice as much fire as a 2A rated extinguisher. Remember: this is in a lab with a trained operator !
      The standard rating for flammable and combustible liquids is 1 square foot of surface area of a "pooled" liquid at an appreciable depth (1/4" or more). Liquids will always seek a lower place, so they will always attempt to "pool" and therefore contain themselves. Liquids that are unconfined pose a greater risk, and are referred to as "three-dimensional" spills. The rating for one unit (1'x1') is 1B. The smallest B:C type extinguishers (2 to 3 lb.) have a 5 to 10B rating. All other things being equal, an extinguisher rated 40B should be twice as effective as one rated 20B.

      There is no standard rating for Class C and Class D fires. When a Class C fire is de-energized, it is treated as a Class A or B type.

      Class D fires burn ferociously, they may burn in the absence of air, and they are highly reactive to water. These fires must be completely covered with a compatible agent to at least 1/4" to 1/2", or more.

      Class K fire extinguishers (6-liter) are rated 2A:1B:C:K. Although this doesn't seem like a lot, these extinguishers are specially formulated to be compatible with most commercial restaurant hood fire suppression systems, and they can certainly be used at home. They offer easier clean-up and less down-time after use.


      http://www.iflss.net/fire%20Extinguishers.htm#The rating system
      Thanks. I was aware of the above. My question concerns why do 2 extinguishers, both 5lbs, apparently containing the same chemicals have different ratings, 1 10B & 1 40B? Is it because of a different nozzle, an additive to the chemicals or a newer rating system?
      I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
      Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
        Thanks. I was aware of the above. My question concerns why do 2 extinguishers, both 5lbs, apparently containing the same chemicals have different ratings, 1 10B & 1 40B? Is it because of a different nozzle, an additive to the chemicals or a newer rating system?
        All things being equal--if the nozzles are of equal diameter--I am going to have to say it is the mix of ingredients in the chemical. One may coat a fire/cover the fuel differently with different-sized particulates than the other...
        World's Youngest Grumpy Old Man

        AF&AM

        Opinions expressed in my posts are mine alone and do not reflect those of my employer, the client, or SIW Forums (unless specifically stated for moderation purposes)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by UnsupervisedCanadian View Post
          Hotel,

          One of my duties here is to inspect the fire extinguishers. Ours vary in sizes from 5lb to 20lb cans, they are ABC, and we're just phasing out the old cartridge units. The numbers appear to be what material class it can extinguish & chemical composition according to the article below.


          The rating system for portable fire extinguishers can be very confusing. It is based on the types of fire, i.e., A;B;C;D;or K. When testing began long ago, labs used a 3'x3'x3' "crib" of loosely stacked wood. If a fire extinguisher and a trained operator could extinguish this crib of wood when fully involved with fire, it received a 1A rating. To visualize higher ratings, just multiply the volume of the "cribbed" wood stack. A 5 to 6 pound dry chemical extinguisher is rated at 2 or 3A depending on its chemical mixture. All other things being equal, a 4A rated extinguisher should be able to extinguish twice as much fire as a 2A rated extinguisher. Remember: this is in a lab with a trained operator !
          The standard rating for flammable and combustible liquids is 1 square foot of surface area of a "pooled" liquid at an appreciable depth (1/4" or more). Liquids will always seek a lower place, so they will always attempt to "pool" and therefore contain themselves. Liquids that are unconfined pose a greater risk, and are referred to as "three-dimensional" spills. The rating for one unit (1'x1') is 1B. The smallest B:C type extinguishers (2 to 3 lb.) have a 5 to 10B rating. All other things being equal, an extinguisher rated 40B should be twice as effective as one rated 20B.

          There is no standard rating for Class C and Class D fires. When a Class C fire is de-energized, it is treated as a Class A or B type.

          Class D fires burn ferociously, they may burn in the absence of air, and they are highly reactive to water. These fires must be completely covered with a compatible agent to at least 1/4" to 1/2", or more.

          Class K fire extinguishers (6-liter) are rated 2A:1B:C:K. Although this doesn't seem like a lot, these extinguishers are specially formulated to be compatible with most commercial restaurant hood fire suppression systems, and they can certainly be used at home. They offer easier clean-up and less down-time after use.


          http://www.iflss.net/fire%20Extinguishers.htm#The rating system
          This slipped by me when 1st post. Class K extinguishers ARE NOT rated for Class B or C fires. Only A & K.
          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
            This slipped by me when 1st post. Class K extinguishers ARE NOT rated for Class B or C fires. Only A & K.
            Learn something new every day I guess the author of the article I posted wasn't aware.

            Good to see you back, by the way
            World's Youngest Grumpy Old Man

            AF&AM

            Opinions expressed in my posts are mine alone and do not reflect those of my employer, the client, or SIW Forums (unless specifically stated for moderation purposes)

            Comment

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