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Most important fire safety device/system

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RICHARDSD
    Installed the fire alarm systems with advanced technology. Fire alarm systems are functioned according to the sensor. It sense the surrounding smoke and braking of glass that give signals by ringing bell at home and fire station. This helps in controlling the fire and further tragedy.
    Really? I never knew a fire alarm did that. Wait, what is a fire alarm?

    PS: Go away. Stop spamming, I mean advertising, by trying to look like you are posting useful content.

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    • #17
      Notification devices.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
        After your fire detection/alarm system what do you consider to be your most important/useful fire safety device/system in your building(s).

        In my 2 high rises I consider it to be the pressurized stairways. Next is me
        I'm thinking, particularly in hotels or office mazes that might hold lots of "just there the day" that EMERGENCY LIGHTING might be key.

        Mostly, someone is gonna notice a fire or other threat (except of course CO gas), but I'd be worried about people getting killed by people, not people killed by fire, when power is cut during an emergency.

        I've worked a lot of office construction and they are always testing the systems to death. Mostly they seem to be extremely loud scary "everyone panic" alarm, along with shocking bright strobe light. Being in an office maze of hallways with just these going on and no other lights (except MAYBE dim Exit) would be very panic inducing IMO. Having them stay on in that mode "forever" should be re-thought IMO.

        And don't get me started on the hidden secret "fire doors" that pop out of walls and LOCK SHUT to "help" people take a diff direction than they are used to. Its like a Fun House/House of Horrors. OK, I'm started. IIRC it was what is now the Intuit building off Marine Way in Mtn View close to 101. When the doors slammed shut in the auditorium exit hallway it took us a few minutes to figure out where in blazes we were supposed to go to exit. This was in daytime after spending about 3 days prior in the building.
        Last edited by Squid; 09-28-2018, 03:56 PM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Squid View Post

          I'm thinking, particularly in hotels or office mazes that might hold lots of "just there the day" that EMERGENCY LIGHTING might be key.

          Mostly, someone is gonna notice a fire or other threat (except of course CO gas), but I'd be worried about people getting killed by people, not people killed by fire, when power is cut during an emergency.

          I've worked a lot of office construction and they are always testing the systems to death. Mostly they seem to be extremely loud scary "everyone panic" alarm, along with shocking bright strobe light. Being in an office maze of hallways with just these going on and no other lights (except MAYBE dim Exit) would be very panic inducing IMO. Having them stay on in that mode "forever" should be re-thought IMO.

          And don't get me started on the hidden secret "fire doors" that pop out of walls and LOCK SHUT to "help" people take a diff direction than they are used to. Its like a Fun House/House of Horrors. OK, I'm started. IIRC it was what is now the Intuit building off Marine Way in Mtn View close to 101. When the doors slammed shut in the auditorium exit hallway it took us a few minutes to figure out where in blazes we were supposed to go to exit. This was in daytime after spending about 3 days prior in the building.
          Many years ago I was a guard at a newly built high-tech manufacturing centre. Around the production area they had thick barriers in the corridors that would automatically close when the fire alarm went off, cutting off all normal routes out of the area (of course, fire exits were not blocked). Well, one day the fire alarm went off, and multiple people were "trapped" because of the barriers closing. When we asked them why they didn't exit using the fire exits, they said that "they thought those exits were only for emergencies"

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