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  • The Resolution Revolution Will Be Televised

    Note: This post also appears on SIW's blog.

    Last week I had the chance to chat with Paul Bodell, VP of sales and marketing, IQinvision, which makes high-definition network cameras. One of the key things Bodell mentioned was that a year and a half ago IQinvision was a niche company with a few targeted products, but its growth in the IP video market has “exploded.” With IQinvision’s sales growing 100% each of the last three years, he said those numbers are even higher than what they had originally projected for their investors.

    Bodell pointed to what IQinvision likes to call “The Resolution Revolution” as to why IP video and digital megapixel cameras are impacting the market. Contrary to what some may say, the screen resolution on IP video is passing by analog video. Bodell added, “There’s no substitute for resolution and it’s resolution that [analog video dealers] can’t deliver today.”

    One item of particular concern to security dealers is the fact that IQinvision does 85% of its camera business with “IT guys,” and only 15% with security dealers. When I asked Bodell about this discrepancy, he said that IQinvision is moving to close that gap and perhaps the ratio will be 70-30 next year. “We do have some fast-growing security integrators,” he explained, ”but by and large what we’re seeing right now is a lot of the companies we’re dealing with are hybrid (IT and security).” He also gave a sobering prediction, “By 2008 or 2009 there will be no differentiation between an IT and a security dealer. Security will be a subset of what the IT integration company does.”

    So what’s your take? Will analog video hang on strong for another 5+ years? What about the idea of the security dealer becoming a subset of the IT integration company?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Greg McConnell
    Note: This post also appears on SIW's blog.

    Last week I had the chance to chat with Paul Bodell, VP of sales and marketing, IQinvision, which makes high-definition network cameras. One of the key things Bodell mentioned was that a year and a half ago IQinvision was a niche company with a few targeted products, but its growth in the IP video market has “exploded.” With IQinvision’s sales growing 100% each of the last three years, he said those numbers are even higher than what they had originally projected for their investors.

    Bodell pointed to what IQinvision likes to call “The Resolution Revolution” as to why IP video and digital megapixel cameras are impacting the market. Contrary to what some may say, the screen resolution on IP video is passing by analog video. Bodell added, “There’s no substitute for resolution and it’s resolution that [analog video dealers] can’t deliver today.”

    One item of particular concern to security dealers is the fact that IQinvision does 85% of its camera business with “IT guys,” and only 15% with security dealers. When I asked Bodell about this discrepancy, he said that IQinvision is moving to close that gap and perhaps the ratio will be 70-30 next year. “We do have some fast-growing security integrators,” he explained, ”but by and large what we’re seeing right now is a lot of the companies we’re dealing with are hybrid (IT and security).” He also gave a sobering prediction, “By 2008 or 2009 there will be no differentiation between an IT and a security dealer. Security will be a subset of what the IT integration company does.”

    So what’s your take? Will analog video hang on strong for another 5+ years? What about the idea of the security dealer becoming a subset of the IT integration company?
    5 years is reasonable. It all comes down to money with many small businesses. In time though, analog will be in the same museum as 8-track cassette players.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Greg McConnell
      He also gave a sobering prediction, “By 2008 or 2009 there will be no differentiation between an IT and a security dealer. Security will be a subset of what the IT integration company does.”
      You always have to regard blanket statements like this one - and particularly when they're in the nature of predictions, which are always dicey - with a certain degree of skepticism, or at least with some reservations.

      While the Gospel of Everything-Being-Integrated-With-Everything-Else has its devotees, there are some serious doubts among other professionals on both side of the aisle (IT and Security), not the least of which is the question whether, in creating such "macrosystems", we are not in fact committing one of the six deadly sins in security design, that of creating what in fact amounts to a single point of failure.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SecTrainer
        You always have to regard blanket statements like this one - and particularly when they're in the nature of predictions, which are always dicey - with a certain degree of skepticism, or at least with some reservations.
        I agree. Although, it is always interesting to look back after some time has passed and see whose predictions were closest to being right--or who was way off.

        Originally posted by SecTrainer
        ... one of the six deadly sins in security design, that of creating what in fact amounts to a single point of failure.
        I must confess, I don't know the other five. Could you point me in the right direction or list them? I'm curious! Thanks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Being in the security field over 15 years, I have seen many changes in system design and integration. Security has been evolving into the IT side for quite some time. An example is addressable alarm components, i.e. window sensors, smoke detectors, etc.. Since Axis came out with the IP cameras and servers allot of other companies have jumped on the bandwagon. Analogue systems will be a thing of the past in the future (not as bad as 8-track though) although 5 years is too recent in my opinion. One of the reasons is education. The U.S. is lacking some other countries with regards to the number of IT people in the work force, India is just one example. With the technology and integration demands there is bound to be a backlash in the future.

          With protocals and bandwidth changing frequently I think there will be a surge in security IT over the next few years. But, until the backbones of our distribution systems are upgraded, there will be a lag. With all of the media sites on the internet bandwidth has been hogged by people uploading and downloading videos and music. In house structured systems will do fine. Since outside video monitoring has come into play the last few years. I have seen monitoring centers that have had difficulty with monitoring some businesses due to the internets bandwidth constraints, especially lately since youtube and other sites have come into play. Where we used to use the internet for surfing sites, e-mailing a few pictures to friends and family etc., we now are sending and recieving terrabytes of information worldwide every millisecond.

          In other words, I feel we are only to the "party line" stage of technology. IT will progress but until standards are made for certain products (video compression is one) we will have problems with full integration.
          Last edited by Rooney; 12-19-2006, 05:59 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Post to bury SPAM.
            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

            Comment


            • #7
              While I agree that IP cameras and particularly mega-pixel IP cameras will become the industry standard in the future, there will always be a contigent of analog users. IP camera manufacturers NEED to get their video compressed at the camera before it hits the network if they want to gain mainstream acceptance.

              BTW looking at a demo IP camera at a conference table will give you no indication of what that cameras image will be when it is deployed on an actual network. From an image quality standpoint in a Control Center environment, an analog camera outperforms an IP camera (of course this is my opinion but it is shared by many, including CCTV manufacturers)
              "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." G. Orwell

              Comment


              • #8
                Also, how would even the fastest network handle 160 plus cameras? Then add 1500 to 2000 employees on the day shift? I ahve a system like this. I really don't have the technical answer, but I would venture to say you'd be looking at trouble.

                Of course, you could have a dedicated network, running side by side with the main. What would be the cost?

                I do have a customer (city) with 16 cameras in 3 buildings, all running on a dedicated network, back to a 4th building. I used my standard Ganz Hi-Rez analog cameras, on Vicon video servers, sending it back to ViconNet software on their servers.
                sigpic
                Rocket Science
                Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                One Man's Opinion

                The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The only way I could see doing that many cameras is dedicated networks for each 'section' or 'quad' or whatever you want to call it, then throwing gigabit switches in to "tie them together" at the main point to the controller. Or, multiple controllers using a (5th?) network (better be gigabit, too) to talk to each other.

                  That's a LOT of bandwidth.

                  Oh, I forgot to mention, I really hate it when people put security data on the network that everyone else uses. Two words: Wireshark Root-mode.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We are in the middle of an all IP CCTV system integrated with access control and burg). It is a municipality and they have an extensive SM fiber spine and wanted to use some to create an IP video network (my original design was for a traditional analog system with field located DVRs reporting back over the corporate LAN (VPN, 300K/s for each 16 camera DVR approx) then using virtual matrix SW to view).

                    There is no question in my mind that this IP system will be more expensive when you factor in the dozen or so Cisco GB switches and other devices needed to create the network alone.

                    As for performance, I will not comment on that- but I am still a believer in analog systems.
                    "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." G. Orwell

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Integrator,

                      You can figure 2-3 Mb/s per camera for 22 frames/second transmission because it won't be compressed until it hits the NVR.
                      "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." G. Orwell

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sounds like they have fiber laying around they don't have a use for, or whoever installed the fiber laid extra for security functions.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The fiber was pulled as a pilot to a program to bring fiber to each home in the municipality- they have decided not to move forward with that plan and have LOTS of fiber, all SM
                          "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." G. Orwell

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                            Oh, I forgot to mention, I really hate it when people put security data on the network that everyone else uses. Two words: Wireshark Root-mode.
                            Ok, I'll bite. What's Wireshark Root-mode? I googled it and it only pointed back here to your post. (BTW you just spent your 15 minutes of fame )
                            sigpic
                            Rocket Science
                            Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                            http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                            One Man's Opinion

                            The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by integrator97 View Post
                              Ok, I'll bite. What's Wireshark Root-mode? I googled it and it only pointed back here to your post. (BTW you just spent your 15 minutes of fame )
                              http://www.wireshark.org/

                              Comment

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