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  • Video Wall lag

    Hello everybody,

    looking for some input from some CCTV gurus. I have recently been put in charge of our CCTV system and over the the past six months have gotten it to work much better than it has in the past. I have about 200 cameras, analog and digital IP, on 8 DVNs. I have it set up on three 42" plasmas running off an IBM workstation.

    Here is my problem, the video i run thru the workstation is fine up to about 24-36 cameras in view. Once i exceed that, the the video lags badly. The controllability of the PTZs drop way off at that point too. I can remote interface directly with the DVN and get beautifully smooth video, but when viewed thru the workstation it sucks. this is a $5k workstation and i have a hard time believing that it is getting bogged down. but if it is, what can i do about it? Can you recommend a specific computer that is designed to handle this or is it as simple as swapping out the video card?

  • #2
    I would suspect its your computer. What are the specs on your machine?
    I recently installed avigilon, and while im happy with it, i had to configure a smoking DELL machine to run it and thats only 48 cameras

    Quad core xeon
    2 gigs of RAM
    Quadro 570 video card

    I would venture to say that you dont need quite that much processing power, or that much video card, but i would be interested to know what software and as i said the computer specs

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    • #3
      I have run into this with systems that were installed and needed upgrading. There is ussualy a little lag from the dvn going through a server but should not be much. The main thing is like Scottfree stated. Getting a serious machine with: 1) an excellent graphics card with alot of memory. 2) at least a quadcore or dual quadcore processors. 3) System memory should be atleast a few gig.

      And as Scottfree said it would also depend on the software you are using as well as the makes of the DVN's.

      You may also want to look at what is running on the computer in the background. If there are resource hungry applications running in the background, that will also slow the system down. (especially some anti-virus software which takes up alot of the system cache)

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      • #4
        That's a lot of processing going on with that many cameras. So yea, as said above what are your pc scpecs. But that's most likely your problem. Does this PC do anything else beside video?
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        • #5
          Thank you for the replies, im not sure of the pc specs off the top of my head i will check tonight at work, but i am running DVN5000 servers and Site Manager software both made by Johnson Controls Inc, and no this computer does nothing but CCTV, if that helps

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Unit6Alpha View Post
            Thank you for the replies, im not sure of the pc specs off the top of my head i will check tonight at work, but i am running DVN5000 servers and Site Manager software both made by Johnson Controls Inc, and no this computer does nothing but CCTV, if that helps
            That helps some, but remember as security you are often handed down equipment that others traded in, or given something that is budget appropriate. If you arent sure about aspects of your computer do what i do, either learn about it or make friends with someone in IT and ask them to come take a look.

            I would suspect it being underpowered, but there is also the aspect that some other software may be running on it. I use a Johnson Controls Access system at my facility and i am unimpressed with it to be honest. It supposedly has the latest panels and controllers to allow for smooth use, but i have constant problems. Of course that may just be that this was all installed 8 years ago and until me no one has really given overview to the system

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            • #7
              Thanks for the advice, i have talked with IT, they say it has the best video card you can get. im skeptical of that so I may have to do some research and if i can find a better one have my supervisor get me one. I run P2000 as well, and i am absolutly unimpressed with all of JCIs products. they need to stick with car dashboards.

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              • #8
                It's not just the the video card that matters. Ram, and your processor are very important, in regards to raw power. And video takes raw power.

                On your pc, click "start", then "control panel", then "system" (if you don't see "system", select "performance & maint" then "system". The general tab will tell the processor (like Pentium 4), the processor speed in GHz, and the amount of ram. Then click the "hardware" tab, click "device manage", click the + at display adapter and it will tell you the type of video card.

                If you right click on the desktop, it should list the video card there also, if it does, click that and then in the box that opens click system or properties. This will tell how much video ram you have. Post all that here, and we can give you more feedback.
                sigpic
                Rocket Science
                Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                One Man's Opinion

                The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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                • #9
                  The best way to find system specs that you can give to someone is to click start> run and in the run window type in DXDIAG. That will bring up all the information i would want to know about your system, since current drivers and versions of software are of interest to me as well.

                  You can have a good machine, but without the right support software for the hardware, it may not be running to its fullest potential.

                  You can save that to a text file and PM me with it and i will go over it if you want

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                  • #10
                    ok fellas, here ya go, tell me what you think

                    INTEL Xeon 3.8Ghz, 2GB Ram, Nvidia Quadro FX 4500 with 512Mb of memory

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Unit6Alpha View Post
                      ok fellas, here ya go, tell me what you think

                      INTEL Xeon 3.8Ghz, 2GB Ram, Nvidia Quadro FX 4500 with 512Mb of memory
                      What is not clear is your processor specs for one... You can verify if it is single core, dual or quad by using CTRL/Shift/ESC and then Performance and you can see how many cores you have... The processor speed is more than adequate, I am not sure if number of cores is enough...

                      For viewing these many cameras, how many monitors do you have with this workstation? You should have at least two or better yet, four monitors.

                      Is your OS XP or Win2000? Each have limitations on how they use RAM and how much RAM they can see... As an example, XP is optimized using 2GB, but your software may require higher... Even if you give this system 4GB of RAM, chances are good that your system will recognize only 3GB, as the rest gets reserved by your OS... and yet, it can improve performance substantially.

                      I used this video card before... and did not like it... It did not hold up well in multiple monitor control applications..

                      In most recent project we used ATI 4780 video cards with dual video outputs. Each workstation had to control at least four monitors, so we used two of these cards in each system. Each monitor had to control up to 32 cameras or two 16 channel DVRs. Each workstation had to operate with 128 cameras (32 X 4).

                      We delivered and installed total of four of these workstations and the customer had full control on over 400 cameras using these workstations only. Everything worked perfectly and each workstation costs less than $4K...

                      Now, I noticed that you also are using IP cameras and you did not say how many cameras yet. Dependent which software you are using, you will have limitations on how many of these IP cameras you can streamline through this workstation due to bandwidth requirements and mainly how each IP camera was programmed to stream video...

                      Bosch DVRs are able to take 30 analog video inputs and potentially 32 IP cameras... and yet when we populated all the analog cameras inputs and reached 18 IP cameras simultaneously, the bandwidth available was choked and everything started working very lousy... Something tells me that this is what you are experiencing with this workstation, as it may have reached to its peak of the available bandwidth.

                      In order to give solid answer, can you share how many IP cameras are fed to this DVR, what is the software used and also how many analog cameras are fed to the same DVR? Unless if you have fiber channel network infrastructure, chances are very good that your bottleneck causing this problem is with your network limitations.
                      http://www.cctvshowroom.com
                      http://www.everythingcctv.com

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