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how does one deal with the elements?

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Secure Permagrin View Post
    External cameras are great, but what are the best suggestions to make to clients and potential clients about the elements. We have snow, fog, ice, all these things create obstructions in camera veiws if not properly maintained. whats the best way to tell a client its in gods hands unless you physically go and clean off your camera. Have you heard any solutions other than that?
    One very reliable source you want to check is the book "Intrusion Detection Systems," by Robert Barnard, published by Butterworth. Two exhaustive studies were conducted by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the USAF, DoD agency charged with development and fielding of exterior systems to include CCTV. They developed the "kneel down" CCTV towers. Also latch onto Military Handbook 419A Grounding, Bonding, and Shielding for Electronic Equipments and Facilities, volumes one and two. You might think it overkill that would be a bad call. Your guide is security matters should always be Sensitivity, Criticality and Vulnerability. Since 9/11 those items are in a constant state of flux.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • Rooney
    replied
    Considering where I am based, I have to deal with many temperature extremes. Heat in the desert and cold in the mountains. In the extreme heat of the desert and cold of the mountains there are times when the heater/blower housings are not sufficient to keep up with the environment. In those cases there are a couple of things I do.

    1. Insulate the outdoor housing inside with 1/4" styrofoam with the foil backing towards the outside. Be sure not to get it against the heater element in the housing.
    2. Add a peltier style cooler/heater with a heat sink on the exterior of the housing. I add 2 adjustable relay "click" style thermostats inside the housing. One set to the low temp and one set to the high temp. When the low temp closes it powers the peltier to heat the inside. When the high temp closes it powers the peltier to cool the inside. Works well in conjunction with the heater/blower standard in the enclosures.

    Hope that helps. If you would like a schematic or pictures PM me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Secure Permagrin
    replied
    I just started working here and have been assisting a client where my the previos person left off. There is no documentation but i guess through the winter something happened and lost visibility completely for over a week. I wasnt working here or i might've went and checked it out. so im trying to figure out what happened and attempt to find a solution.


    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    This from http://www.secprodonline.com discussing exterior cameras at airports:

    __________________________________________

    To keep externally-mounted cameras functioning properly, a number of manufacturers offer special enclosures that not only protect cameras from rain, snow, ice and vandalism, but also heat them in winter and cool them in summer.

    "At temperatures over 105 degrees Fahrenheit., most cameras are programmed to go into thermal shutdown," Ferris said. "Right now, our Cooldome protects the camera system in temperatures up to 145 degrees Fahrenheit (63 degrees Celsius), which is far beyond the safe operating limits of most network and analog cameras."

    On the opposite end of the spectrum, Dotworkz's Ring of Fire dome is designed for camera operations in severe cold climates. Patented deicing/defrosting circuits remove snow and ice from the dome that obstruct camera view. The Dotworkz Ring of Fire provides a heated interior that prevents cameras from freezing and allows full mobility of PTZ functions under the harshest weather conditions, even as cold as -40 degrees Fahrenheit.


    ____________________________________

    Looks like you might want to check out Dotworkz .

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Secure Permagrin
    it sure does have a heater but when a huge snow storm hits i think it cant keep up with the accumulation and from what my client told me. R U saying that the heater should prevent this type of build up?
    This from http://www.secprodonline.com discussing exterior cameras at airports:

    __________________________________________

    To keep externally-mounted cameras functioning properly, a number of manufacturers offer special enclosures that not only protect cameras from rain, snow, ice and vandalism, but also heat them in winter and cool them in summer.

    "At temperatures over 105 degrees Fahrenheit., most cameras are programmed to go into thermal shutdown," Ferris said. "Right now, our Cooldome protects the camera system in temperatures up to 145 degrees Fahrenheit (63 degrees Celsius), which is far beyond the safe operating limits of most network and analog cameras."

    On the opposite end of the spectrum, Dotworkz's Ring of Fire dome is designed for camera operations in severe cold climates. Patented deicing/defrosting circuits remove snow and ice from the dome that obstruct camera view. The Dotworkz Ring of Fire provides a heated interior that prevents cameras from freezing and allows full mobility of PTZ functions under the harshest weather conditions, even as cold as -40 degrees Fahrenheit.


    ____________________________________

    Looks like you might want to check out Dotworkz .
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-17-2007, 01:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Secure Permagrin
    replied
    it sure does have a heater but when a huge snow storm hits i think it cant keep up with the accumulation and from what my client told me. R U saying that the heater should prevent this type of build up?

    Leave a comment:


  • SIW Editor
    replied
    Secure Permagrin, as most of our industry is aware, there are a number of heater elements and 24V heater-blowers (and housing lens wipers) available to use with video camera mounts. Fog obviously is a problem if you're talking natural light views (there are some cool options that see "through" fog on a different wavelength).


    [However, I should note that the camera you promoted in your link has a heater as an option and is designed to be resistant to harsh environments as well. That said, I feel that you are simply baiting some promotion out of this post -- else why would you ask if there are tools to help in cold weather when you know quite well that cameras come with heaters as options and then you provide a link 5 minutes later to one of your own camears that offers just that. Consider this your last warning on being overly promotional. I have told you before that vendors are welcome on our boards (in fact I've invited quite a few myself to come respond to individuals' product/technology questions), but I expect you to contribute real discussion and real problem solving, not just real promotion.]

    Leave a comment:


  • Secure Permagrin
    replied
    we have one client who does remote monitoring with a fiber optic camera in the heart of the adirondacks where it is almost impossible to get to the cameras during the winter and i would love to offer a solution other that snowshoes...lol

    Leave a comment:


  • FireEMSPolice
    replied
    Our cameras take a beating from the Ohio elements. Everything from rain to lightning strikes. Sensormatic is slow to respond to service calls.

    Leave a comment:


  • Secure Permagrin
    started a topic how does one deal with the elements?

    how does one deal with the elements?

    External cameras are great, but what are the best suggestions to make to clients and potential clients about the elements. We have snow, fog, ice, all these things create obstructions in camera veiws if not properly maintained. whats the best way to tell a client its in gods hands unless you physically go and clean off your camera. Have you heard any solutions other than that?

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