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Access control badges- Security Dept or IT?

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  • Access control badges- Security Dept or IT?

    At your business, is the Security Manager responsible for issuing access badges AND the associated software, or is that an IT role?
    I am new in my role as a Security Manager, and the IT Manager is pushing for me to learn the software for issuing and changing badge privileges, even though she previously did it. It is very complicated software and programming, and I am already swamped with CCTV footage and investigations. I'm suspecting that she just wants it off her plate, and we are equals. I am the first to fill this role, so there is no precedent. Who does it at your business?

  • #2
    I've seen it done by both - Security or Administration / Management. She is probably thinking that because access control is a security function, it is your job. On the other hand, human resources or the personnel manager are the ones who do the hiring / firing / promoting, so it is not a stretch to say this is their deal.

    It would be worth learning just because every job is training for the next job. But if you are swamped and you have someone under you that you trust and is IT savy, you could delegate it to them. I've learned it is OK to say "no" to added work, but you have to be real careful to be clear and tactful, and remain a "team player."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
      ...
      It would be worth learning just because every job is training for the next job...
      That was my thought as well. I'm going to learn it either way because it never hurts to learn something, but I want to find a tactful way to have IT be the lead on it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
        I've seen it done by both - Security or Administration / Management. She is probably thinking that because access control is a security function, it is your job. On the other hand, human resources or the personnel manager are the ones who do the hiring / firing / promoting, so it is not a stretch to say this is their deal.

        It would be worth learning just because every job is training for the next job. But if you are swamped and you have someone under you that you trust and is IT savy, you could delegate it to them. I've learned it is OK to say "no" to added work, but you have to be real careful to be clear and tactful, and remain a "team player."
        Learning things like how to program access cards can be a valuable asset if you are looking to move beyond entry-level guard work to higher-paying jobs within the security industry. I'd go as far as to say that if someone does not have significant LE/military background, becoming skilled in the fields of physical security (acquiring, installing, maintaining security hardware, lock/key control, etc...) or personnel security (managing security clearances, issuing/programming access cards, etc..) are the two main ways into getting a good-paying, career security job.

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        • #5
          Security guards need to verify the identity of the people who are getting badges issued. They should know enough to print new and replacement badges when people show up with no badge and need access. If your badges also provide access to IT systems then the provisioning of the card should be finalized by IT. If the access card is just access then physical security team owns it. It's just a key. Keys are out and this is the new key. Access should be defined by control groups that are set up between the direct manager and HR to ensure that each person has access to all the doors they need to do their jobs. If the card doesn't give them the access they need they need to take it up with HR and their manager but you could also argue that the guards should know who has access to what. That way you would know if a person was in an area they should not be in.

          The systems that grant door access and computer access are likely separate systems, owned by different teams. The provisioning should follow those logical delineations. IT might help you set up the hardware and software that you use to print, issue, and assign but once they get it working they don't own it anymore. IT should help you if there is a problem with the hardware or software. Guards should be trained on operation. (They always are in every place I've worked)

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          • #6
            The topic of Convergence in Security Management is extensively written about in the 7th edition of Effective Security Management.
            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
            Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

            Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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