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UnderCover LED Dash/Visor Lights GEN II +P

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  • UnderCover LED Dash/Visor Lights GEN II +P

    Hello,
    If anyone is interested in high quality north american built LED warning lights please check out www.c-tecelectronics.com. We have just released the Aduro and it is a very powerful warning light that is easily hidden for under cover work. The optional mounting kit allows you to mount the light to almost any area inside your vehicle. We also carry the Responder which has the same dimensions as the Aduro but uses Gen I lights. The Gen I lights still deliver excellent light output.

    There are lots of videos on the site showing our lights in use. As you will see in the videos, we have excellent products that deliver excellent visual results.

    If anyone has any questions please let me know.
    Thanks,
    James
    C-Tec Electronics
    [email protected]

  • #2
    One question to consider here is what do you believe security would do with those lights? Would they be used for traffic control, constant use as marker lights or visiblity, or would they be pulling over cars?
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

    Comment


    • #3
      We have found that many Security Professionals are also Reserve Law Enforcement Officers, or Volunteer Fire Fighters. These are the people that need proper lighting when responding to calls but do not want to spend excessive amounts of money for personal vehicle lighting.
      There are also LP members that need to conduct road side compliance checks and require extra lighting on the rear of their vehicle for safety when stopped on the side of a roadway.
      Thanks,
      James

      Comment


      • #4
        Light bars are good. Dash lights are OK. Visor lights are generally useless in marked security vehicles, I'm afraid.

        Have to ask, what's an LP member?
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

        Comment


        • #5
          Loss Prevention Member..... in that I mean a member of the forum who is classified as a Loss Prevention Investigator. Guess that sounded a little weird now that I look back at the post, sorry.

          Visor lights are great as supplemental lighting or primary lighting in personal vehicles. They tuck up out of the way when not in use so they do not make the vehicle stand out.
          All our lights can be either dash/deck/glass or visor mounted so they are rather versatile.
          Thanks!
          James

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CTecElectronics
            Loss Prevention Member..... in that I mean a member of the forum who is classified as a Loss Prevention Investigator. Guess that sounded a little weird now that I look back at the post, sorry.

            Visor lights are great as supplemental lighting or primary lighting in personal vehicles. They tuck up out of the way when not in use so they do not make the vehicle stand out.
            All our lights can be either dash/deck/glass or visor mounted so they are rather versatile.
            Thanks!
            James
            Originally posted by CTecElectronics
            There are also LP members that need to conduct road side compliance checks and require extra lighting on the rear of their vehicle for safety when stopped on the side of a roadway.
            Its always good to have an obvious primary warning system if your driving a marked security vehicle. Having an unmarked security vehicle with dash lights is an invitation for harassment from the police, since it "resembles a police car."

            As to the second quote above, I have never heard of a "roadside compliance check" in loss prevention. You may be confusing one job function for another. Loss Prevention members work in retail enviornments, being on the side of the roadway is usually the provience of a patrol operator, and usually only then when broken down - the roadway is public property.

            Also, do you have restrictions on what colors you sell to what states?
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, please tell me you arent selling red and blue to just anyone who can afford it.
              "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
              "The Curve" 1998

              Comment


              • #8
                The best tools for marked security vehicles, in my opinion, are a full sized lightbar that is amber or yellow when activated and back windshield lights that are also yellow. Generally, we have no business with most sorts of dash lights or anything red, white, or blue, as these colors (in most states of the U.S.) are illegal for private vehicles and we can be brought up on charges of impersonating a police officer for using them. Other colors such as orange, green, and purple are permissible in some states since they are not defined in the transportation code, but I guarantee if we start using them very much they will be criminalized as well.

                It should also be noted we can be brought up on those charges in most places and under most circumstances for pulling a car over. This has received a lot of negative attention lately. Many believe it is commonplace for people who do our job to conduct "traffic stops", but that is simply not the case. That is a police function.

                It is also illegal in most states to stop on a roadway, more so if the flashing lights are activated, or to direct traffic unless you are a police officer with a registered emergency vehicle.
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1stWatch
                  The best tools for marked security vehicles, in my opinion, are a full sized lightbar that is amber or yellow when activated and back windshield lights that are also yellow.

                  It is also illegal in most states to stop on a roadway, more so if the flashing lights are activated, or to direct traffic unless you are a police officer with a registered emergency vehicle.
                  I agree with 1stWatch regarding the light bar. In Connecticut, one may use flashing amber, blue, and green lights on a POV that is operated on public roads if you have been granted a flashing light permit. Blue for volunteer firefighters (red for the Fire Chief), green for ambulance volunteers, and yellow for tow trucks, snow plows, security, etc.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What light designates Police in CT?
                    "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                    "The Curve" 1998

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
                      What light designates Police in CT?
                      Red/Blue combination.
                      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So a private citizen can operate one or the other?
                        "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                        "The Curve" 1998

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
                          So a private citizen can operate one or the other?
                          Basically. See below.

                          Sec. 14-96q. Special restrictions on lamps. Flashing lights. (a) Any lighted lamp or illuminating device upon a motor vehicle, other than head lamps, spot lamps or auxiliary driving lamps, which projects a beam of light of an intensity greater than three hundred candle power shall be so directed that no part of the beam will strike the level of the roadway on which the vehicle stands at a distance of more than seventy-five feet from the vehicle.
                          (b) No person shall drive or move any vehicle or equipment upon any highway with any lamp or device thereon displaying a red light visible from directly in front of the center thereof. The provisions of this subsection and subsection (c) shall not apply to authorized emergency and maintenance vehicles.
                          (c) Flashing lights are prohibited on motor vehicles other than school buses, except (1) as a means for indicating a right or left turn, (2) flashing blue lights used by members of volunteer or civil preparedness fire companies, as provided by subsection (b) of section 14-96p, (3) on certain emergency and maintenance vehicles by written permit from the commissioner, (4) flashing or revolving yellow lights on (A) wreckers registered pursuant to section 14-66, or (B) vehicles of carriers in rural mail-delivery service or vehicles transporting or escorting any vehicle or load or combinations of vehicles or vehicles and load which is or are either oversize or overweight, or both, and operated or traveling under a permit issued by the Commissioner of Transportation pursuant to section 14-270, (5) flashing red lights (A) on a motor vehicle accommodating fifteen or fewer handicapped students used only during the time such vehicle is stopped for the purpose of receiving or discharging such handicapped students, (B) used by members of the fire police on a stationary vehicle as a warning signal during traffic directing operations at the scene of a fire, (C) on rescue vehicles, (D) used by chief executive officers of emergency medical service organizations as provided in subsection (a) of section 14-96p, (E) ambulances, as defined in section 19a-175, or (F) used by local fire marshals or directors of emergency management, (6) flashing green lights used by members of volunteer ambulance associations or companies as provided in subsection (c) of section 14-96p, or (7) flashing white lights or flashing lights of other colors specified by federal requirements for the manufacture of an ambulance used in conjunction with flashing red lights or flashing head lamps and a flashing amber light on an ambulance responding to an emergency call. The prohibitions in this section shall not prevent the operator of a motor vehicle who while traveling on a limited access divided highway, because of the grade, is unable to maintain the minimum speed of forty miles per hour, or who while traveling on any other highway is operating such motor vehicle at such slow speed as to obstruct or endanger following traffic, or the operator of a disabled vehicle stopped on a hazardous location on the highway, or in close proximity thereto, from flashing lights, installed on the vehicle primarily for other purposes, in any manner that the operator selects so as to indicate that such vehicle is traveling slowly, obstructing traffic or is disabled and is a hazard to be avoided. The commissioner is authorized, at such commissioner's discretion, to issue special permits for the use of flashing or revolving lights on emergency vehicles, on escort vehicles and on maintenance vehicles, provided any person, firm or corporation other than the state or any metropolitan district, town, city or borough shall pay an annual permit fee of two dollars for each such vehicle, provided vehicles not registered in this state used for transporting or escorting any vehicle or load or combinations of vehicles or vehicles and load which is or are either oversize or overweight, or both, when operating under a permit issued by the Commissioner of Transportation pursuant to section 14-270, shall not require such permit. Such annual permit fee shall be twenty dollars.
                          (d) Use of lamps and flashing lights except as authorized by this section shall be an infraction.
                          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mr. Security
                            I agree with 1stWatch regarding the light bar. In Connecticut, one may use flashing amber, blue, and green lights on a POV that is operated on public roads if you have been granted a flashing light permit. Blue for volunteer firefighters (red for the Fire Chief), green for ambulance volunteers, and yellow for tow trucks, snow plows, security, etc.
                            My state doesn't have such a structured flashing light permit for private vehicles. I think they just assume the like of security vehicles and utility vehicles will just use yellow since that is most common. We have had some flap about security companies using white and blue lights. Some say it is legally permissible on private property because of a vague clause in the tr.c. about non-applicability of certain statutes on private property. I avoid the whole issue and don't use them at all.
                            "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              New England

                              This area just LOVES to regulate everything and anything. Thus, the SQUARE badge laws. It gives the legislators something to do.
                              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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