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A great IP camera- buit in server

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  • A great IP camera- buit in server

    We have finished an IP camera with the sever built-in.
    You just connect it to the Internet by an Ethernet cable, you can surveil your house or office by Internet Explorer remotely .
    Only one IP camera !!
    It is the lowest cost remote monitoring solution .
    See also : http://www.chinaroby.com/english/ipc-300.htm




    Email : [email protected]
    Web: http://www.chinaroby.com

  • #2
    Not bad? Do you have American Distributors? What is the minimum order you require before exporting?
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      It is definitely interesting. How much?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dam Guard
        It is definitely interesting. How much?
        He's a manufacturer in China. I'm familiar with a few of their operations, you need to bring say... 100 or 1000 of the units over at a time before its worth their while. But, you give them literally anything, and they'll give you a cheaper copy of it. Sometimes, the quality is retained.

        This is especially true for light bars, uniforms, and duty gear.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Dam Guard
          It is definitely interesting. How much?
          You can purchase samples at $95 each and the unit price for 100-lots is $75 per unit.

          One thing is that, as you would expect, the camera quality is only fair, requiring 2.5 lux of light, for instance. There are other IP cameras, some not much more expensive, that will operate at 1 lux or below.

          This is not to say units like these do not have an application, because they certainly do - just be sure you don't need something that either the camera or the built-in IP server can't deliver.

          Another option is to use an IP video server which can be hooked up to almost any camera, such as the S-DVR IP200. The advantages of a solution such as this would be:

          1. Camera quality and other issues are "delinked" from the IP server feature. This means that the camera can be chosen independently and appropriately for each application instead of having to accept the camera that happens to come with the built-in IP server.

          2. A lot of legacy installations (although perhaps not all) can be brought online without replacing expensive cameras.

          3. As you'll notice in the description for the IP200 by following the link, a dedicated IP video server tends to have a lot more capabilities and options. In this case, you have both audio and video, as well as the capability of monitoring up to 9 cameras from the one video server unit. The unit cost for this product is $190 including S&H, so it costs you about $20 to add IP server capability to each camera. Again, for legacy and multi-monitoring installations, this product would likely make more sense than individual IP/server cameras.

          Note: Although the functional diagram provided on the linked page shows a PC on the internal network, the video server does not require it, being linked directly to the DSL router. The PC would, however, provide local monitoring of the video server.

          This is just one example of the IP video servers that are being produced now. You can find many others with a range of features and prices.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-29-2007, 09:44 AM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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          • #6
            Thank you for the information.

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            • #7
              Hacking Concerns?

              A couple of concerns regarding the model on the first post of the thread- is the site the camera is wired to completely secured, so as to deter threats of unwanted exposure to crooks, thieves, and the always dreaded HaxX0Rrs (lol, sorry, net geek slang).

              A second concern would be who is interested in purchasing the product, aside from the security professionals on this board. IE- Stalkers, voyeurers, pedophiles, rapists, crooks trying to watch a property for the guard and entrance/extraction areas, etc. Is the vendor screening the clients that buy from him?

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              • #8
                Regarding your first question, I assume you could take the same steps to protect this server as any other, (filtering router/firewall, highly restricted access control lists, port restrictions, placing it behind a VPN router with encryption and/or in a DMZ, physical access control, etc.). You can also restrict the camera to FTP uploads with email alerts (a number of S/FTP servers can be pretty tightly locked down if properly configured and can use SSL/SSH connections, etc.).

                As for the second question, I'm sure the answer is the same for most security products that aren't highly sensitive in terms of their technology - no criminal or other background checks are run on purchasers. However, since this isn't a wireless camera, the bad guy would have to purchase some additional gear in order to use it for some of the purposes you mention.

                It's like anything else...build a higher wall and you can bet that someone out there will figure out how to build a taller ladder.
                "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SecTrainer
                  One thing is that, as you would expect, the camera quality is only fair, requiring 2.5 lux of light, for instance. There are other IP cameras, some not much more expensive, that will operate at 1 lux or below.
                  Very true and appropriate that you have pointed out the "Achilles Heel" of many Network Cameras. Other than Progressive Scan Video technology, which greatly enhances the video stream, you still need to consider the camera's sensitivity and response to difficult lighting conditions; otherwise, you just won't get video.

                  I am very concerned that there will be a substantial increase in criminal activity once the bad guys realize that certain facilities have taken "shortcuts" in their IP Camera deployment, making the monitoring less capable of identification.

                  There are step-by-step methods available to selecting and deploying these systems.

                  You've also pointed out the use of external video server and encoder use where the requirements of the IP camera are exceeded by its analog counterpart. Another good point!
                  Best regards, Steve Surfaro
                  Panasonic Systems Solutions / Strategic Technical Liaison

                  Industry Panasonic|ASIS Physical Security Council|SIA Standards|BICSI |NICET |SecurityInfoWatch.com |NetworkCameraReviews|IPCameraForum
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