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  • Many Opting For Security Guards, Not Cops

    http://www.apbweb.com/featured-artic...-not-cops.html

    Here’s how disaster capitalism works. First you say something like “government is not a solution. It can only be a problem.” You repeat that for several decades until even government employees buy into the idea. Then you cut funding for government functions like local law enforcement. When the cuts create entirely predictable problems, you then use those problems as evidence that “the system is broken.” Enter “private sector solutions.” According to a recent article in the Christian Science Monitor, budget cuts in Oakland have led to a shortage of cops on the beat.



    And now that residents are aware of the reductions in manpower and coverage, the ones who have the means are going the non-government route. Some of the city’s more affluent neighborhoods have turned to unarmed security guards to take the place of the sworn, trained personnel who used to patrol their neighborhoods.

    Just after residents of neighborhoods like Oakmore or Piedmont Pines leave for work in the morning, security companies send their employees to ward off burglars looking to take advantage of unattended homes.

    “With less law enforcement on the streets and more home crime or perception of home crime, people are wanting something to replace that need,” says Chris de Guzman, chief operating officer of First Alarm, a company that provides security to about 100 homes in Oakland. “That’s why they’re calling us and bringing companies like us aboard to provide that deterrent.”

    Oakland is hardly a unique situation.

    Across the country the security guards that were once seen only in shopping malls and gated communities are now increasingly present on city streets, doing the work once handled by certified cops.

    But although private security guards have been used by homeowners associations and commercial districts for years, the trend of groups of neighbors pooling money to contract private security for their streets is something new.

    Besides Oakland, neighborhoods in Atlanta and Detroit have hired firms to patrol their neighborhoods, says Steve Amitay, executive director of the National Association of Security Contractors.

    Mr. Amitay is a very busy man these days.

    “It’s happening everywhere,” Mr. Amitay told reporters.

    “Municipal governments and cities are really getting strapped in terms of their resources, and when a police department cuts 100 officers obviously they are going to respond to less crimes.”

    And this is just the tip of the iceberg, both in terms of impending police layoffs and the subsequent markets those lost jobs open up for private interests

    Revenue into cities has drooped every year since 2007, according to the National League of Cities.

    Oakland, despite struggling with one of the highest murder rates in the nation and monitors from the Department of Justice, laid off 80 police officers in 2010.

    Sgt. Arturo Bautista, a department spokesman says the change in the level of service has not gone unnoticed.

    “Because of the short staff and the calls for service, officers are pretty much going from call to call to call,” he said.

    In other words, there’s very little time for a two-man unit to baby sit a wealthy neighborhood that recently had one break in.

    The growth in the private security industry is expected to mirror the explosive growth in recent years in the for-profit prison industry. Analysts project that the private security industry is projected to grow by about 19 percent in coming years. Most of that growth will come because private firms are doing jobs once held by law enforcement.

    If you ask residents which they would prefer —cops or guards — they invariably choose trained police officers. But agreeing to a tax hike that would raise the money to pay for them is another story.

  • #2
    It is funny you mentioned this........

    Just the other day I got an e-mail from a S.O. that I had worked with previously.
    He was at the time working 1st shift security and going to the Police Academy
    at night. He told me he had just been hired by the PD of a nearby town. I thought
    he would be a strong candidate (no military but strong self-defense skills)

    Another S.O. I worked with also got hired about 6 months ago (PD). He was a 2 tour
    Iraq veteran (artillery). He told me when he went for his interview there
    were 2 stacks of resumes. The interviewer told him there were going to
    be 3 hires (he being one of the strongest candidates) and 2 "political". In his case
    the city was going to pay his PD training.

    Still another S.O. I have worked with was a graduate of the Police Academy; but could
    not seem to find a job. He very smart security type guy. He told me had a problem with
    defensive driving skills at the Academy; I took more than one try.

    I think in the Sunshine State things are better than elsewhere?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by sec-guy View Post
      It is funny you mentioned this........

      Just the other day I got an e-mail from a S.O. that I had worked with previously.
      He was at the time working 1st shift security and going to the Police Academy
      at night. He told me he had just been hired by the PD of a nearby town. I thought
      he would be a strong candidate (no military but strong self-defense skills)

      Another S.O. I worked with also got hired about 6 months ago (PD). He was a 2 tour
      Iraq veteran (artillery). He told me when he went for his interview there
      were 2 stacks of resumes. The interviewer told him there were going to
      be 3 hires (he being one of the strongest candidates) and 2 "political". In his case
      the city was going to pay his PD training.

      Still another S.O. I have worked with was a graduate of the Police Academy; but could
      not seem to find a job. He very smart security type guy. He told me had a problem with
      defensive driving skills at the Academy; I took more than one try.

      I think in the Sunshine State things are better than elsewhere?
      In keeping with this discussion:

      http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/Content/...301/Lyons.aspx
      "Lo Que Sea, Cuando Sea, Donde Sea"

      "Veni, Vidi, Vici!"

      "Whatcha gonna do now, PL?"

      "Strategy is the craft of the warrior. Commanders must enact the craft, and troopers should know this Way. There is no warrior in the world today who really understands the Way of strategy." Shinmen Musashi No Kami Fujiwara No Genshin

      http://sentinelsofflorida.com/ is where I go for all of my Florida security info.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tacticalguy View Post
        thanks tac.............
        seems to make a lot of sense......
        If you call me "ancillary officer"; I CAN get the donuts every day...
        Last edited by sec-guy; 05-07-2013, 01:27 PM. Reason: more

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sec-guy View Post
          thanks tac.............
          seems to make a lot of sense......
          If you call me "ancillary officer"; I CAN get the donuts every day...
          Always happy to help, sir. LOL@donuts!
          "Lo Que Sea, Cuando Sea, Donde Sea"

          "Veni, Vidi, Vici!"

          "Whatcha gonna do now, PL?"

          "Strategy is the craft of the warrior. Commanders must enact the craft, and troopers should know this Way. There is no warrior in the world today who really understands the Way of strategy." Shinmen Musashi No Kami Fujiwara No Genshin

          http://sentinelsofflorida.com/ is where I go for all of my Florida security info.

          Comment


          • #6
            http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/articl...es-4503461.php

            One Police Investigator for 10,000 Burglaries. You wonder why crime is up in Oakland huh?

            Hell even the firefighers narrowly escapes the shootings.

            http://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/...ng-4499730.php
            Last edited by macguard; 05-09-2013, 09:35 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm on record on this forum as predicting this trend from way back, its what sparked me to restart my career in security after 20yrs doing other stuff.

              As USA turns into a 3rd world nation, those that got money for security will pay for it, while local govts whither, just like in other 3rd world nations.

              The rich will dodge taxes, and save their money for services they got some control over.


              Santa Clara County is maybe gonna "re-switch" ambulance companies,http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-...tros-ambulance due to "slow response" etc, and for those who don't know SC county is hella big and rich, so we ain't talking about peanuts. Now, if only our elected officials still had the authority to take such "executive action" regarding Law Enforcement admin and personal, like before the "Civil Service System", my guess is we wouldn't even be hearing about things like taxpayers and simple homeowners hiring additional "security" on their own dime.

              Comment


              • #8
                Other factors Squid alluded to...

                Certainly loss of tax revenue and the the privatization mantra has led to this. A big part of it is the general breakdown of society. I lived in one apartment complex that had a rather low crime rate due to the fact that as diverse as we were, everyone got along, knew their neighbors and watched out for each other. Sadly, the area I live in now is in a better part of town, but everybody keeps to themselves, the teens run around unsupervised while Mommy and Daddy watch TV in separate rooms and guzzle wine, and the PD is understaffed but trying very hard. All of which adds up to a pretty high daytime burglary rate and a lot of malicious mischief at night.

                On a side note, I am convinced that one reason why Washington and Colorado legalized pot was to save money - With harder drugs getting into the suburbs, LE and prosecutors can't go after everyone. (Time will tell how "harmless" weed really is - I predict an underclass that will simply lay around all day watching "Scooby Doo" and only put the bong down when its time to go get food stamps or the welfare check.)

                Just my two cents...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm thinking "Just AFTER the leave for work in the morning" is wrong approach. I'd lobby for that extra hour so security in on duty AS they leave so they will see who actually lives there so they wont be 'bluffed' later.

                  Also give clients chance to give face to face tips and directions (ex brother in law most definitely NOT allowed anywhere on prop including back yard?, ABC home theater installers IS allowed and has keys and phone # etc)

                  Good thief will use a 5 minute window to good advantage and be looking like a executive about to leave for the office for the day before he "forgets something" and heads back into house.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You are correct, sir. A site I worked at had a rash of car prowls even with two guards on. We finally pinned the times down and guess what - they were waiting about 15 minutes after the guards clocked off duty in the morning (no day guard), and went about their crime.

                    To give you a time frame, one study in my area said most daytime break-ins occur between 9:00am and 1:00pm. Makes sense - most people work 9 to 5. Preschools and kindergarden start getting out around noon or 1:00pm, with regular schools following from there. Most of the seniors I know like to do their errands in the morning, so the can beat the "soccer mom" traffic when its time to get the kids from school. All adds up to empty houses and no one around to see what's going on...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                      You are correct, sir. A site I worked at had a rash of car prowls even with two guards on. We finally pinned the times down and guess what - they were waiting about 15 minutes after the guards clocked off duty in the morning (no day guard), and went about their crime.

                      To give you a time frame, one study in my area said most daytime break-ins occur between 9:00am and 1:00pm. Makes sense - most people work 9 to 5. Preschools and kindergarden start getting out around noon or 1:00pm, with regular schools following from there. Most of the seniors I know like to do their errands in the morning, so the can beat the "soccer mom" traffic when its time to get the kids from school. All adds up to empty houses and no one around to see what's going on...
                      CG- Nice assessment. We had Allied Barton just sign a huge contract with the City of Camden and Camden county to have 200 security officers walking the beat as ambassadors in the war torn streets of Camden, very dangerous and a step back for the city, they're wearing traffic vests in fluorescent green and are unarmed. We live in a day and age where the city tries to save money with security officers taking the place of some skilled steely eyed investigators and cops who are proven. The shoot team Investigators had an overload of cold cases over a three month period, with each new day another one or more taking the top spot and pushing the lower one into the cold case file, kids who looked like they just saw a deer in the head lights are not going to get it done. That said, two years ago I transferred to another location and was very happy to say bye bye to that A/O. I worked as an armed officer protecting the Organized Crime Task Force who leased 3K square feet from a Govt building and worked from this location and I saw everyday what the shoot team had to face each and everyday, Some young kids who we're hired as patrol officers we're partnered with veterans and these young officers looked clueless. I hope this all works out for city of Camden, buy I saw what happens when you place kids into a WAR situation, without Leadership and guys who know what it takes to survive is going to be nothing more then a FUBAR. Any person in their right mind would have to be nuts to take an unarmed position in such a WAR zone.


                      Pops..
                      Last edited by Pop pop; 06-24-2013, 08:48 AM. Reason: TO GET IT RIGHT
                      Pop Pop - It reminds me of an old statement by my Master Sergeant. "A Good Run is better then a Bad Stand".

                      Sec Trainer- Pop Pop: Hope you don't mind if I quote your Master Sergeant. He was a very smart man.

                      Pop Pop- Yes Sir, Thank you Senior Instructor Sec Trainer, hope you don't mind if I place your quote into my Signature?

                      Sec Trainer- Permission granted, recruit. Now, police the company area!


                      flat out cool..

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Back to the original link in this post about OAKLAND POLICE and residents going for private security.

                        Gee, do you think the fact that OPD has been under FEDERAL COURT control for over tens years with no end in sight because they are UNWILLING to correct massive corruption...but taxpayers are still forced to pay them and no way in hell can fire any....might have a little something to do with it???

                        Fact is OPD continues to employ HUNDREDS of cops who didn't speak up about the massive corruption we all saw during the "riders" trial and aftermaths.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I dont think this would fly in Ohio. I certainly wouldnt walk any beat unarmed.
                          "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Security guards are definitely better than police officers for the following reasons:
                            1. They are cheaper. It's true, the median security guard pay is less than half the median police officer pay and the private sector can operate far more efficiently than bureaucracies.
                            2. Security guards can be trained to do everything a LEO does. Security companies can run their own version of a police academy to give their guards similar skills to that learned by LEOs. And especially for patrolling the neighborhood for suspected burglaries. They just have to watch for any suspicious activity and pull out their guns and say "Get down" and either the burglars get down, or the security guards shoot them. (There are many neighborhood watch programs where regular civilians with a CCW directly confront burglars, security guards with training should definitely be able to do this.).
                            3. The police have an abysmal record of protecting neighborhoods only plagued by burglaries. They focus all their resources on high crime areas, where muggings, murders, and various vices are the norm, and I can't really blame them. When I was a kid I lived in a relatively poor city but our area was quite wealthy. As such it was a prime target for burglars. However, there was no violence here so very rarely would you see a police car in the area. Hence, when the burglar alarms did go off, the average response time for the police was close to 40 minutes! If we had security patrols, I'm sure the burglary rates would have dropped.
                            4. The police have no duty to protect. That's right. There are multiple Supreme Court rulings showing that the police departments have no legal obligation to protect civilians. However, security companies are contractually obligated to provide the services the client paid for.
                            5. Police officers have at many times abused their power and the most people can do is sue the city at taxpayer's expense. The police departments don't lose any money and always protect their officers. However private companies will fire guards that they deem a liability

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tesla_Motors View Post
                              Security guards are definitely better than police officers for the following reasons:
                              1. They are cheaper. It's true, the median security guard pay is less than half the median police officer pay and the private sector can operate far more efficiently than bureaucracies.
                              2. Security guards can be trained to do everything a LEO does. Security companies can run their own version of a police academy to give their guards similar skills to that learned by LEOs. And especially for patrolling the neighborhood for suspected burglaries. They just have to watch for any suspicious activity and pull out their guns and say "Get down" and either the burglars get down, or the security guards shoot them. (There are many neighborhood watch programs where regular civilians with a CCW directly confront burglars, security guards with training should definitely be able to do this.).
                              3. The police have an abysmal record of protecting neighborhoods only plagued by burglaries. They focus all their resources on high crime areas, where muggings, murders, and various vices are the norm, and I can't really blame them. When I was a kid I lived in a relatively poor city but our area was quite wealthy. As such it was a prime target for burglars. However, there was no violence here so very rarely would you see a police car in the area. Hence, when the burglar alarms did go off, the average response time for the police was close to 40 minutes! If we had security patrols, I'm sure the burglary rates would have dropped.
                              4. The police have no duty to protect. That's right. There are multiple Supreme Court rulings showing that the police departments have no legal obligation to protect civilians. However, security companies are contractually obligated to provide the services the client paid for.
                              5. Police officers have at many times abused their power and the most people can do is sue the city at taxpayer's expense. The police departments don't lose any money and always protect their officers. However private companies will fire guards that they deem a liability
                              Curtis just spilled coffee in his lap reading this.
                              http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

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