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  • Fire Dept needs our help.

    I must say that I have the utmost respect for the fire guys an gals. The other night while watching the news there was a piece on how several firemen rushed into a home and rescued 3 kids from certain death. When interviewed they were very matter of fact about it. A few mins later the news guys did a clip on how people do not clear the fire hydrants of snow and ice so the firemen can find them. It showed some of the same firemen shoveling out the hydrants.

    So I'm thinking of all the talent with lots of time on their hands on this forum someone may come up with another way to help these guys clear the hydrants that doesn't require back breaking shoveling. I came up with a 3 foot dia alum trash can with a 2 inch connection on the side that will plug into the trucks exhaust pipe. Just tip it over the Hydrant and let the snow melt. Next time you are bored on shift think about how a better system would work. We can put a rover on Mars but are still shoveling snow.
    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
    http://www.boondocksaints.com/

  • #2
    Chucky, that is a really good, cheap (and I mean that in a good way, because these days everything is based on cost), effective way to take care of the problem you described.

    Nicely done!

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    • #3
      Forgive me

      I am from Texas, so I do not totally undertsand this concept of "snow." What would you do in the case that the hydrant could not be located because of a drift? Signage like everything else? Good idea for sure, though. I wish I had a way to post my sketchbook. I spend alot of time doodling "reinventions."

      Comment


      • #4
        Hydrants are flagged with 4' fiberglass rods that are spring loaded here... typically will have hay stacked around them as well to help insulate a bit and make it easier to clear out... tossing 4 bales of hay is quicker than having to shovel it out.
        Overmotivated and Underpaid... I'm a Security supervisors wet dream...

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        • #5
          Devils Advocat -
          Up my way, Firemen make well over 65 a year plus pension and other benefits for a 4 on 4 off schedule. + vacation. Any hazardous work is calculated and proper equipment provided and they are trained for it, give them a shovel.

          I do thank them for contributing to a better society, they get the glory often, just like a quarter back, but are not the whole team.
          Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
          Groucho Marx

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          • #6
            Eric...

            Ok, so, some firemen may make pretty good pay, but what about volunteers who also go into the same fires and dangerous situations? Remember, they don't get squat. Also, if my house is burning, I don't want to wait on the firemen to shovel friggin snow to get started.

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            • #7
              Not a problem here. But if it was I'd certainly say that'd be an excellent thing to do, keeping the hydrants clear. One thing that drives me nuts (and I'll enforce vigorously if I'm allowed to) is people parking in front of hydrants and in red zones.

              One of the first things I'll do on a new site (if its indoors) is verify where all the fire exits are and that they're unobstructed. Not just for me but for the clients too. One thing about security, we generally deal with safety for only a few people at a time. Fires have (and probably still will) kill hundreds at a time.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dougo83 View Post
                Ok, so, some firemen may make pretty good pay, but what about volunteers who also go into the same fires and dangerous situations? Remember, they don't get squat. Also, if my house is burning, I don't want to wait on the firemen to shovel friggin snow to get started.
                Right on both counts. On the line of if my house is burning, I do not care who is helping me out (male or female) as long as they can carry me.

                Continuing on the devils advocate -
                Seems to be a few people on welfare or unemployment benefits of some kind, perhaps the Unions will allow them to "give back"....
                Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                Groucho Marx

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                • #9
                  My borough has signs with a picture of a fire hydrant on the top of a 7 or 8 foot pole beside the hydrants.

                  We also have a steam truck that they can use to thaw frozen hydrants.

                  My condo is located in row housing. The attached buildings are very old. I was an auxiliary firefighter in the mid 70's & during that time there were many fires in my type of building that would destroy 6 or more units. There is a fire hydrant outside of my condo. The row housing have 3 appartments stacked on top of each other. There are no driveways, only street parking. With this dense housing both sides of the street are always completely packed with cars. Every night when I come home I check if someone has parked in front of the hydrant. If so I call the By-Law Enforcement unit & they get a ticket. So far about 6 have gotten them. Never any repeats
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                  • #10
                    I may have put to much inferences on not finding the Hydrants as ours do have 6 foot red rods that stick up on top of the Hydrant. The actual more serious problem is that even if they see the signs the hydrant still has to be cleared so they can attach hoses to them. At the time of a fire they won't have time to shovel each one out so they go around shoveling them out during the day if they can. I'm thinking about a way to make that task faster and easier. The average 1000 Gal pumper will empty in less than 5 mins.
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
                    http://www.boondocksaints.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chucky View Post
                      The actual more serious problem is that even if they see the signs the hydrant still has to be cleared so they can attach hoses to them. At the time of a fire they won't have time to shovel each one out so they go around shoveling them out during the day if they can. I'm thinking about a way to make that task faster and easier. The average 1000 Gal pumper will empty in less than 5 mins.
                      I admire your ingenuity and drive.

                      Problem with heat is leaving the resulting water to freeze.
                      Problems with electrical charges are cost and puppie death by urination.
                      A big leaf blower may work on fresh snow but not on packed mounds, someone still would have to operate a shovel.

                      good luck
                      Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                      Groucho Marx

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Eric View Post
                        A big leaf blower may work on fresh snow but not on packed mounds, someone still would have to operate a shovel.
                        Eric, they have something more powerful than a leaf blower that I used to use to clean the fresh snow off of our First Responder vehicle when I was a medic with a Rescue Squad. The compressed air in the SCBA tanks is at 2,200 psi - blows the snow right off the vehicle
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Our hydrants in Ohio are whats called a dry hydrant. At the property where I work, we have an army of plows when it gets bad. They are careful not to pile snow around the hydrants.


                          Instead of a shovel, how about this

                          Last edited by FireEMSPolice; 01-01-2008, 09:32 PM.
                          "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

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                          • #14
                            That'd make an awesome leafblower too!

                            On a side note....all this fire talk reminded me of a time at Clearwater Beach when I ran into a crowded firehouse and yelled "MOVIE, MOVIE, MOVIE!"

                            Yep, the fireguys had the exact same reaction. One smartguy got it though and told me it's a felony if my dyslexia gets cured.
                            You can educate dumb, but you can't fix stupid.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              FireEMSPolice .............. I like very much !!!

                              Good for when the gang is around and you have a sudden thought for a BBQ and more guests arrive uninvited too.

                              I guess not being in a state that gets snow (very rare and only in Maelstroms state in the ski fields), these little things are issues that need to be dealt with through innovation and planning. As much as I always wanted a white-Xmas not some (115f sweat box with flies, hot and cold food and most of the time spent in the pool), but I think I shall pass thanks.

                              What about a chemical device for melting the snow if you can find the hydrant and on a side note - all of ours are in the ground (road) until they run a standpipe into the hydrant and pumper.

                              Bad enough in Switzerland taking 20 minutes to get dressed to go into the snow to walk 500 yds to
                              "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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