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  • Excercise

    Would does your exercise program look like? Mine changes by the days of the week. Its never the same. Last week looked like this....

    MON Jogging, Cycling, pushups, situps, pullups, crunches, etc
    TUES Gym (aerobic and weights)
    WED Rest (long walk with dog)
    THurs Jogging, Gym (aerobics and weights)
    Fri Jogging, Rocclimbing
    SAT Rest (long walk with dog)
    SUN Jogging, Gym (aerobic and weights)

    For Supplements I just drink a shake of Twinlab Mass Fuel. I don't take prohormones or testosterone boosters anymore.

  • #2
    i go to the gym... once or twice a week atm, i have membership to 24 hr fitness, and i like it as my awake time is usuasally around 7p till 10 a as i work graveyards.... 24 hr fitness works perfect for me as they are open when im up
    Its not how we die that counts.....
    Its not how we lived that counts....
    all that matters is how we saved that one life that one time by being in the right place at the right time....

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    • #3
      Me too. I have a membership at 24hr fitness.

      Comment


      • #4
        I hope to start some type of martial arts next week and am trying to quit smoking. I will either be doing Aikido or Tae Kwon Do.
        Todd

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tlangsr
          I hope to start some type of martial arts next week and am trying to quit smoking. I will either be doing Aikido or Tae Kwon Do.
          Stop "trying to quit" and start quitting. "Trying to quit" is a mental trap. As long as you can comfort yourself with the idea that you're "trying to quit", that's all you'll do. And, you'll become VERY successful with "trying". In fact, you'll become expert at it, but the problem is, you won't ever stop smoking. People who "try to quit" rarely do stop smoking. There's an enormous difference between "trying" to do it and DOING IT.

          I know - I tried for years until I got sick of trying. Oh, I'd become very good at trying. (Got yourself an "emergency smoke" stashed somewhere, do you? "Just in case it gets to be too tough", you know...well, it always gets to be too tough.)

          See, the problem is that "trying" implies that it's also okay to fail. I mean, at least you TRIED, right? Hey, whaddya want? I TRIED! Time came that I had to not only give up smoking, I had to also give up "trying to quit smoking" because BOTH of them had gotten to be real bad habits. I was either smoking or "trying to quit smoking" - the only thing I wasn't doing was NOT SMOKING!

          "Get off my back, willya...I'M TRYING TO QUIT!!"

          "Well, I'll have this one little puff...but that's okay because I'M TRYING TO QUIT!!".

          What I had to come to terms with - and (as funny as it sounds) grieve about was facing a future without my old pal, Mr. Ciggie. Mr. Ciggie had seen me through many a tough time, and he was my drinkin' pal, too. How could I ever survive without my buddy, Mr. Ciggie?

          You gotta blow the bastard's head off, because he's nobuddy's buddy.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-13-2007, 10:32 PM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SecTrainer
            Stop "trying to quit" and start quitting. "Trying to quit" is a mental trap. As long as you can comfort yourself with the idea that you're "trying to quit", that's all you'll do. And, you'll become VERY successful with "trying". In fact, you'll become expert at it, but the problem is, you won't ever stop smoking. People who "try to quit" rarely do stop smoking. There's an enormous difference between "trying" to do it and DOING IT.

            I know - I tried for years until I got sick of trying. Oh, I'd become very good at trying. See, the problem is that "trying" implies that it's okay to fail. I mean, at least you TRIED, right? Time came that I had to not only give up smoking, I had to also give up "trying to quit smoking" because BOTH of them were bad habits in which one became either permission or a reason to do the other.

            Get off my back, willya..."I'M TRYING!!" Well, I'll have this one little puff...but "I'M TRYING!!". What I had to come to terms with - and (as funny as it sounds) grieve about was facing a future without my old pal, Mr. Ciggie. Mr. Ciggie had seen me through many a tough time, and he was my drinkin' pal, too. How could I survive without Mr. Ciggie? You gotta bury the bastard because he's no friend of yours.
            Thank you, I have never thought of it that way.
            Todd

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            • #7
              Calisthenic stuff (pushups, situps, pullups, dippies, etc) and running.

              I sometimes have a hard time getting motivated, so I have my 6-year-old son do them along with me; he gets a $0.50 a day "physical fitness bonus" on his allowance if he does it.

              If future funds allow it, I'm heading to that Crossfit place.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tlangsr
                Thank you, I have never thought of it that way.
                Todd, I want you to know this. QUITTING is tough, but it ISN'T FOREVER, like your body tries to tell you. The body has a natural cleansing process and this begins the minute you say "no" to your first craving.

                I would also encourage you to use the nicotine patches/gum/lozenges. THEY DO REALLY HELP with the creepy-crawlies. WalMart has a cheaper generic brand than Nicoderm and they work just fine. Start with the 21-mg strength and work your way down. I also used the lozenges to handle those "surprise attacks". Using a lozenge puts something in your mouth, which is part of the physical aspect of the habit.

                The nico-patch/gum/lozenge plus mental relaxation techniques (the craving really DOES GO AWAY in a few minutes, Todd, if you give it a chance) did the trick for me. See, the problem really is, when you get to feeling uncomfortable, your mind and body are telling you "THIS WILL NEVER GET BETTER. I CAN'T LIVE LIKE THIS!"...

                ...and laughing at the nicotine craving is also a VERY good technique, because the fact is, it doesn't have the power you're afraid it has. In fact, no habit or addiction of any kind is TRULY stronger than human will, if we could only understand that it's a battle, and take the fight to the enemy with no intention to surrender.
                Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-13-2007, 10:45 PM.
                "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SecTrainer
                  Todd, I want you to know this. QUITTING is tough, but it ISN'T FOREVER, like your body tries to tell you. The body has a natural cleansing process and this begins the minute you say "no" to your first craving.

                  I would also encourage you to use the nicotine patches/gum/lozenges. THEY DO REALLY HELP with the creepy-crawlies. WalMart has a cheaper generic brand than Nicoderm and they work just fine. Start with the 21-mg strength and work your way down. I also used the lozenges to handle those "surprise attacks". Using a lozenge puts something in your mouth, which is part of the physical aspect of the habit.

                  The nico-patch/gum/lozenge plus mental relaxation techniques (the craving really DOES GO AWAY in a few minutes, Todd, if you give it a chance) did the trick for me. See, the problem really is, when you get to feeling uncomfortable, your mind and body are telling you "THIS WILL NEVER GET BETTER. I CAN'T LIVE LIKE THIS!"...

                  ...and laughing at the nicotine craving is also a VERY good technique, because the fact is, it doesn't have the power you're afraid it has.
                  I'll do that, I will still do the martial arts too, to help with the cravings.
                  Todd

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tlangsr
                    I'll do that, I will still do the martial arts too, to help with the cravings.
                    Try Krav Maga for a good "martial arts" form. Easy to learn and use, no complicated tests and belts system, real-world applications, and a pretty strenuous workout to begin each class.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wilrobnson
                      Try Krav Maga for a good "martial arts" form. Easy to learn and use, no complicated tests and belts system, real-world applications, and a pretty strenuous workout to begin each class.
                      I've never heard of that style, don't even know if there is anyone around here to teach it, but it doesn't hurt to check it out.
                      Todd

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I quit smoking at midnite on the 1st of March. Just up and quit. When I got off work at 2300 I gave my last pack to a coworker and took one for the ride home. That was the last cig I smoked.

                        No patches, no meds, no nicotine gum. Just good ol fashion Trident. Actually now they got new flavors and that helps. The first couple days were rough and I went through ALOT of gum, but now it's not so bad.

                        The last few days at work have been hectic and I've felt myself craving a little bit but I think I'm ok and gonna make it.

                        Good luck to anyone else that quits.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tlangsr
                          I'll do that, I will still do the martial arts too, to help with the cravings.
                          You can do it Man. I have quit much more addictive stuff than nicotine.

                          Replace your addiction with excercise. Sweat all those toxins out.

                          Good Luck


                          Krav Maga is good stuff. You need a martial art that trains you to get hit. That real life resistance good.
                          Last edited by BoxerGuard; 03-14-2007, 02:56 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Work out split

                            Mon: Legs, Arms (free weights)
                            Tue: Off
                            Wed: Cardio
                            Thu:Chest, (Free weights), Cardio
                            Fri: Cardio
                            Sat: Back, shoulders, (Free weights) Cardio
                            Sun: Off

                            My problem is eating clean. My asthma acts up and I miss a week or to of working out and get mad and start pigging out. I snap out of it in a few days and get back to eating good.

                            I started working out all most 2 years ago and I have lost 35 pounds of body fat and gained like 12 pounds of muscle last time I had my numbers ran. As soon as I get the ok from my Dr. (I just had Nose surgery 2 weeks ago) I will get back at it.

                            As for quiting smoking. It was at work after a stat call where I had to run and then fight a mope. After the incident I started for the "smoking area". Gasping for air I grabbed my rescue inhailer from my pocket, took 2 puffs, and put it back. I then had arrived at the "but huts" outside. To get my smokes I had to take my, RESCUE inhailer, out of my pocket to get my smokes out. I thought you MORON! and I quit right then. That was 5 years ago.

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                            • #15
                              I am tired of the chest pains while I inhale the damn things. waking up and coughing until my chest hurts.
                              Todd

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