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  • Legalizing homelessness

    https://www.city-journal.org/washing...homeless-camps

    And notice we use the sad term "homelessness," instead of "legalizing drug addicted petty crooks with no permanent residence."

    Well, security jobs will be on the rise, that's for sure. What this is about is giving the state's largest city a pass for becoming a set for "The Walking Dead." There is nothing to "legalize," since the city has already told the police that drug vagrants are a protected class, and the city prosecutor doesn't prosecute. The state attorney general is busy getting ready to run for governor, the governor is busy running for president - I am seriously considering filing for political asylum in Canada from the People's Democratic Republic of Washington, except Vancouver, BC is pretty much the same...

  • #2
    Can the citezens of Seattle be given
    Representative Mia Gregerson,

    home address since she loves this idea?


    Some
    homelessnes can come live in her home

    &&&

    In Boston "homelessness camp out in Boston's subway stations. Defecate and urine on them selves



    https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/03...-and-stations/
    http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

    Comment


    • #3
      CG:

      Want to know whose fault this is with homeless doing what they dang well please from Seattle, to Boston to San Francisco?

      US, WE We keep electing these Boobs, soft hearted bleeding heart politicians

      Long, long ago the Boston Police and Transit police would go into the bowels of the subway stations
      and move along those individuals who did not belong, or doing drug, or other crimes
      And if you did not obey a Boston Police officer, you were about to learn a hard lesson
      Sometimes a club to the back of the head.

      Barbaric what the Boston police did? Okay send your 15 year old daughter
      down into a Transit Subway station and have her have to walk around the person sleeping at the entrance

      The individual at this subway station many moons ago, would have been dragged off to the Hoosegow
      by the Boston Police





      https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/03...-for-homeless/



      https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/03...30-complaints/
      http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

      Comment


      • #4
        Every highway off ramp has one with a pitty me sign.

        Comment


        • #5
          And some make hundreds a day.

          Cope, we had the same out here Back in The Day. No more...

          Comment


          • #6
            Seattle is the poster child of what not to do, although it does seem to be a west coast thing, from L.A. to Vancouver, BC. We are way too nice - we don't bother them, we give them hand outs, welfare, food stamps, free clothes - everything except an incentive to rejoin society and follow the rules.

            Fake news is another big factor. I've read more than one article that says that the majority of these people are from the area, implying they got caught in the insane housing price boom and wound up homeless. Sorry, my experience is roughly 50/50 to 60/40 - the 60% being people who came here from other places. And the excuses are so lame - one addict tried to tell me she was going to beauty school here, but got kicked out of her apartment and, you know, blah blah. (When I think of Seattle, I don't think of "world class cosmetology academies.")

            We have the lowest unemployment rate in decades - if you want to and can work, you can get something in this town. People who don't make $70,000 a year do what they have to - get roommates, live outside the city, get a P/T gig, etc. What they don't do is set up a tent, shove a needle in their arm and cry, "I'm a victim of capitalism!"

            I am all for a safety net, especially for the real victims - the disabled, the mentally ill, the sick and elderly. But there really is a "Homeless Industrial Complex," consisting of politicians, consultants and private programs that do little but cost the taxpayers a lot. What puzzles me is the passivity of the regular citizens. I am hoping for change this year with the city council election coming up, but trust me, I'm still looking to move elsewhere.
            Last edited by Condo Guard; 03-15-2019, 02:25 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
              Seattle is the poster child of what not to do, although it does seem to be a west coast thing, from L.A. to Vancouver, BC. We are way too nice - we don't bother them, we give them hand outs, welfare, food stamps, free clothes - everything except an incentive to rejoin society and follow the rules.

              Fake news is another big factor. I've read more than one article that says that the majority of these people are from the area, implying they got caught in the insane housing price boom and wound up homeless. Sorry, my experience is roughly 50/50 to 60/40 - the 60% being people who came here from other places. And the excuses are so lame - one addict tried to tell me she was going to beauty school here, but got kicked out of her apartment and, you know, blah blah. (When I think of Seattle, I don't think of "world class cosmetology academies.")

              We have the lowest unemployment rate in decades - if you want to and can work, you can get something in this town. People who don't make $70,000 a year do what they have to - get roommates, live outside the city, get a P/T gig, etc. What they don't do is set up a tent, shove a needle in their arm and cry, "I'm a victim of capitalism!"

              I am all for a safety net, especially for the real victims - the disabled, the mentally ill, the sick and elderly. But there really is a "Homeless Industrial Complex," consisting of politicians, consultants and private programs that do little but cost the taxpayers a lot. What puzzles me is the passivity of the regular citizens. I am hoping for change this year with the city council election coming up, but trust me, I'm still looking to move elsewhere.
              It's been my experience that most homeless people are not homeless because their jobs or support payments do not pay enough to pay for housing, but rather that they have serious psychological/mental heath issues or addictions that make it so they cannot really use the existing support structures.

              Comment

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