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  • question for the hospital guys

    when you are called to "restrain" some one who may be acting violent, do u usually take like a sheet in and "strap em down to thier beds" or what do you do ? to protect yourself and the hosptial staff ?
    When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

  • #2
    When I worked at a hospital we used soft restraints which were then fastened to the bed frame. They were either restrained at all four points both hands and feet or three points both feet and one hand, depending on the doctors orders. The restraints were either a web type material with velcro or leather with buckles.
    Everyone at the hospital was trained in how to use the restraints. If there was a violent patient, there was one person on each limb and another person that was in charge of putting the restraints on.
    Last edited by T202; 05-31-2006, 11:11 AM.

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    • #3
      Restraints

      We have several types of restraints, the most comon in the ER in in ICU are called "leathers" they are leather cuffs that strap to the bed frame rail (one for each arm and leg). we also have "soft restraints" (kinda like the leathers but made of cloth) and posie vests which are vests that secure to the bed or chair.

      As far as protecting staff and ourselves we have OC Foam, and Asp batons, we use to be armed but some tree hugging suit said that the world was a safer place and that thier was a "National trend" of hospitals disarming thier security officers. Then 3 months later 9-11 happened. And some day when we have to secure the hospital and some mope comes in with a gun or a bat and we can not stop him...

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      • #4
        We use an escalation scale....
        Soft Restraints (cloth)
        Hard Restraints (leathers well actually rubber)
        Chemical Restraint (the good stuff)

        OD we had last night went straight into hard restraints and quickly progressed into Chem and it took a lot of valium to knock him out. Had me, 3 PD officers and a room full of techs and nurses trying to keep him still so they could treat him!!


        Vacation in 3 Days!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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        • #5
          We use a brand of restraints called RIPP Restraints. Velcro and straps on them. We four point the patient to the bed.

          As far as violent behavior goes the call is normally ours, and signed off by the doc's, when we take on a patient who is using active aggression, or we believe they will use active agression against anyone. This usually occurs in the emergency department. We do get called to the ward floors to restrain patients, but not nearly as often. If the medical staff wants them in soft restraints they do it, we're not allowed and medical staff are not allowed to use RIPP's since they are not trained in their use.

          Our use of force scale places the use of our taser lower on the scale than our OC or ASP's, so if they're really wanting to push it they'll end up riding the lightning.
          "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aka Bull
            We use a brand of restraints called RIPP Restraints. Velcro and straps on them. We four point the patient to the bed.

            As far as violent behavior goes the call is normally ours, and signed off by the doc's, when we take on a patient who is using active aggression, or we believe they will use active agression against anyone. This usually occurs in the emergency department. We do get called to the ward floors to restrain patients, but not nearly as often. If the medical staff wants them in soft restraints they do it, we're not allowed and medical staff are not allowed to use RIPP's since they are not trained in their use.

            Our use of force scale places the use of our taser lower on the scale than our OC or ASP's, so if they're really wanting to push it they'll end up riding the lightning.
            It sounds like your using force in a law enforcement capacity - to protect others from criminal attack. I'm glad at least some hospitals still allow their security staffs to protect people from criminal attack, and not treat them as caregivers and tell them to "run away."
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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            • #7
              In the case of a violent patient we will usually assist medical staff in applying Velcro and cloth restraints. If the patient is so out of control that there is a fear of injury to staff while applying restraints we can use handcuffs to restrain while chemical restraint is applied.
              Drew Neckar
              Hospital Security Supervisor
              ---------------------------------------------------

              Always forgive your enemies--nothing annoys them so much.
              --Oscar Wilde—

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              • #8
                A good security officer who knows what he is talking about can help educate the staff on self defense techniques and then ever so subtlety and with aplomb strongly encourage the chiefs nursing and residency to contact the local crime prevention unit and ask if a personal safety course can be taught to the staff. Two to three classes should do it.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill

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                • #9
                  One time we had a guy that was uncontrollable. The police were called, we showed them to the room he was in and stood outside. After a period of 10 minutes, the police came out. My fellow officer asked them, "You're keeping him with us?" and the police officer responded, "Yeah, he's a asleep." The police left and we stuck around to finish our reports. Suddenly we heard a crash and a scream come from the room and ran to it. The drunk went after a nurse, after playing 'sleep' for the cops. We assested the medical staff. They used leather straps.

                  Being a contractor, we shouldn't be touching the patients, the maintainence guys should...but the staff forgets things.
                  Last edited by LavianoTS386; 06-01-2006, 12:23 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GCMC Security
                    We use an escalation scale....
                    Soft Restraints (cloth)
                    Hard Restraints (leathers well actually rubber)
                    Chemical Restraint (the good stuff)

                    OD we had last night went straight into hard restraints and quickly progressed into Chem and it took a lot of valium to knock him out. Had me, 3 PD officers and a room full of techs and nurses trying to keep him still so they could treat him!!


                    Vacation in 3 Days!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                    We do pretty much the same...if we have a frequent flyer (someone known to us) we will sometimes go right to chemical restraint (Vitamin H - Haldol) if we know it is only a matter of time before we have to do it anyway.

                    We had two very violent Meth OD's today and we met the Ambulance and Police in the Ambulance Bay and the fight was on...did chemical restraint on both and it's been a nice quiet afternoon!
                    ========================================
                    Keep an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out! - Unknown

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      It sounds like your using force in a law enforcement capacity - to protect others from criminal attack. I'm glad at least some hospitals still allow their security staffs to protect people from criminal attack, and not treat them as caregivers and tell them to "run away."
                      We're proactive in our approach to providing security - no "observe and report". It is difficult to get the contract officers into this mode as they are primarily taught that "observe and report" is correct for security officers.

                      It's a lot better to interject ourselves into any situation at the earliest possible point with the goal of preventing any adverse activity. We head off a great many problems - makes us more "community" oriented and the staff get the idea - sometimes after prompting from us and/or waiting too long - to call us in quickly if things begin to escalate.

                      The hospital global policies tell staff to bring us in and let us handle it, we've got the specialized training - not them. It can work once the staff realize that we don't tell them how to practice medicine so don't tell us how to practice good security.
                      "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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