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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    One patrol company I worked for had call sheets for the dispatcher/operator to fill out. We had various ones for "disturbance call", "alarm", "break-in", "vandalism", etc. It made operations quite a bit smoother.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    This is an excellent idea. This way, instead of having to commit to memory something, they have a little checklist. If you have the budget, write the checklist on a half sheet of paper with enough room for written answers under each question. Laminate it. Distribute with alcohol pens.

    Instant dispatch call sheet.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    Our "dispatchers" in our hospital are the hospital operators. They too send us to calls of a "disturbance" on the floors with little or no info. We continually emphasize the "need for them to get more info".

    Might I suggest you make them up a checklist of basic questions you - as the security officer - would like asked the moment your operators are asked to send security. Might improve what info your operators get for you before you respond.
    Great Idea, I am currently working with the lead hospital operator to establish a better communication plan

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    [QUOTE=.....In dealing with these types of calls I have another problem. I regularly get a call "Security is wanted at the bar" PERIOD! No other info. I call the Operator back & ask "what for?" I'm told "I didn't ask". This drives me nuts Am I walking into a robbery, do I need to bring a first aid kit, a fire extinguisher? I keep telling the Operators over & over that they MUST get as much information as possible when giving me this type of call but still it happens often.[/QUOTE]

    Our "dispatchers" in our hospital are the hospital operators. They too send us to calls of a "disturbance" on the floors with little or no info. We continually emphasize the "need for them to get more info".

    Might I suggest you make them up a checklist of basic questions you - as the security officer - would like asked the moment your operators are asked to send security. Might improve what info your operators get for you before you respond.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    In the sheriffs academy we were taught to assess the situation, and if warranted, make the bad guy think you were crazier than they were.
    <snip>
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    An exchange I thought was funny:
    EDI Officer: "I think Nate was going to shoot him."
    Me: "I was not. He put the toy gun down."
    Tampa Police Officer: "Oh, they all think you're insane, and will kill them all."
    Me: "O rly."
    Tampa Police Officer: "Its keeping you guys alive out here. Keep it up."

    This was after we started dismantling the local drug trade on the property, and really pissing some folks off. Two teens with a toy gun wrapped in electrical tape approached us. The "weapon" was in the kid's waistband. I got out "gun" before drawing down.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Oh my goodness, out of the f---ing pan and into the f---. Wait, I think you may be objecting to another "f" word.
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Perhaps. However, I don't think civility is a problem here on this forum and I'd like to keep it that way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by darrell
    Thats whats I was trained to do when I carried my gun.

    I heard it works really well.
    In the sheriffs academy we were taught to assess the situation, and if warranted, make the bad guy think you were crazier than they were.
    Today the term, I believe, is mental judo.
    In the modern era, that type of behavior would be looked upon as antagonizing the subject causing his behavior to escalate.
    Hopefully the folks writing doctrine have spend some time in the field and at least scared half-to-death a time or two.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • darrell
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    A old veteran range officer once told me that if you ever have to pull your weapon on a high risk suspect, scream and swear at him like a madman. He may actual think your nuts enough to really want to shoot him.

    Thats whats I was trained to do when I carried my gun.

    I heard it works really well.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    It's no wonder you get insufficient information about calls since non-security personnel answer the phones and give what they have to you. It would be nice to have a separate line for security that is answered by one of your staff instead.
    I AM the Security staff

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Nathan, my wife thinks that after a number in "retirement" I could act like the rest of the human race and sit where you want to. I have to remind her that there are certain people who do not take kindly to have been sent to prison based on what you did.....
    You can say that again! I just finished reading about two separate ambushes on the police at ODMP. Be safe and watch your back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    We had a policy on that. Find out why we're going there, or we won't respond. Period.
    I agree. When I first started in dispatch, I quickly learned that officers want as much information as possible about the call they are responding to. That included checking in-house for any prior contact that LE might have had with the parties involved.

    If a dispatcher failed to warn the officers, you can bet that their next stop was back at HQ to kick your rear end for risking theirs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    I do not make it a habit to curse in the performance of my duties but there times when a few well placed curse words do serve a purpose. There are some people that do not understand the concept of civility and one has to speak in their tongue to effectively communicate.
    Perhaps. However, I don't think civility is a problem here on this forum and I'd like to keep it that way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I only sit in the corners with my back against the wall. It drives my girlfriend nuts. I showed this to her, and she's like, "Oh, good, other people are driven nuts too."
    Nathan, my wife thinks that after a number in "retirement" I could act like the rest of the human race and sit where you want to. I have to remind her that there are certain people who do not take kindly to have been sent to prison based on what you did.
    It took years to hone those skills and a sufficient number of near misses to keep them fresh in my mind. LEO or SO, some folks place great stock in the old saying, "Revenge is a dish best served cold."
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    In my case it's the hotel switchboard Operator that dispatches us. It's a 500 room hotel with place for 2 Operators. There is one during the day shift & one on the afternoon shift. Overnight the calls are transfered to the one Night Auditor who works as Auditor/Front Desk Clerk/Operator/Night Manager!
    It's no wonder you get insufficient information about calls since non-security personnel answer the phones and give what they have to you. It would be nice to have a separate line for security that is answered by one of your staff instead.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    In my case it's the hotel switchboard Operator that dispatches us. It's a 500 room hotel with place for 2 Operators. There is one during the day shift & one on the afternoon shift. Overnight the calls are transfered to the one Night Auditor who works as Auditor/Front Desk Clerk/Operator/Night Manager!

    Leave a comment:

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