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  • #31
    Originally posted by T202
    A old veteran range officer once told me that if you ever have to pull your weapon on a high risk suspect, scream and swear at him like a madman. He may actual think your nuts enough to really want to shoot him.

    Thats whats I was trained to do when I carried my gun.

    I heard it works really well.
    http://img363.imageshack.us/img363/3203/darrell29jc.gif

    The FUTURE is MSP...

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    • #32
      Originally posted by darrell
      Thats whats I was trained to do when I carried my gun.

      I heard it works really well.
      In the sheriffs academy we were taught to assess the situation, and if warranted, make the bad guy think you were crazier than they were.
      Today the term, I believe, is mental judo.
      In the modern era, that type of behavior would be looked upon as antagonizing the subject causing his behavior to escalate.
      Hopefully the folks writing doctrine have spend some time in the field and at least scared half-to-death a time or two.
      Enjoy the day,
      Bill

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      • #33
        Oh my goodness, out of the f---ing pan and into the f---. Wait, I think you may be objecting to another "f" word.
        Originally posted by Mr. Security
        Perhaps. However, I don't think civility is a problem here on this forum and I'd like to keep it that way.
        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
          In the sheriffs academy we were taught to assess the situation, and if warranted, make the bad guy think you were crazier than they were.
          <snip>
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill
          An exchange I thought was funny:
          EDI Officer: "I think Nate was going to shoot him."
          Me: "I was not. He put the toy gun down."
          Tampa Police Officer: "Oh, they all think you're insane, and will kill them all."
          Me: "O rly."
          Tampa Police Officer: "Its keeping you guys alive out here. Keep it up."

          This was after we started dismantling the local drug trade on the property, and really pissing some folks off. Two teens with a toy gun wrapped in electrical tape approached us. The "weapon" was in the kid's waistband. I got out "gun" before drawing down.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #35
            [QUOTE=.....In dealing with these types of calls I have another problem. I regularly get a call "Security is wanted at the bar" PERIOD! No other info. I call the Operator back & ask "what for?" I'm told "I didn't ask". This drives me nuts Am I walking into a robbery, do I need to bring a first aid kit, a fire extinguisher? I keep telling the Operators over & over that they MUST get as much information as possible when giving me this type of call but still it happens often.[/QUOTE]

            Our "dispatchers" in our hospital are the hospital operators. They too send us to calls of a "disturbance" on the floors with little or no info. We continually emphasize the "need for them to get more info".

            Might I suggest you make them up a checklist of basic questions you - as the security officer - would like asked the moment your operators are asked to send security. Might improve what info your operators get for you before you respond.
            "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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            • #36
              Originally posted by aka Bull
              Our "dispatchers" in our hospital are the hospital operators. They too send us to calls of a "disturbance" on the floors with little or no info. We continually emphasize the "need for them to get more info".

              Might I suggest you make them up a checklist of basic questions you - as the security officer - would like asked the moment your operators are asked to send security. Might improve what info your operators get for you before you respond.
              Great Idea, I am currently working with the lead hospital operator to establish a better communication plan

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              • #37
                This is an excellent idea. This way, instead of having to commit to memory something, they have a little checklist. If you have the budget, write the checklist on a half sheet of paper with enough room for written answers under each question. Laminate it. Distribute with alcohol pens.

                Instant dispatch call sheet.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #38
                  One patrol company I worked for had call sheets for the dispatcher/operator to fill out. We had various ones for "disturbance call", "alarm", "break-in", "vandalism", etc. It made operations quite a bit smoother.
                  "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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