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Ten Deadly Sins

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  • crankloud
    replied
    Aus accidents

    Australian law states if damage in an motor vehicle accident exceeds $500 or someone is injured then the police have to be called.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    I forgot our differences again! We have "no fault" insurance here. And when I said "accident" in the garage I should have said "damage". Say a jockey opens a door & hits the wall. This is not something that requires a police report even in areas where police reports are needed for accidents. Yet guests still insist on calling them sometimes when this happens. The police arrive, tell them it's a civil matter & leave.

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  • Tennsix
    replied

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    It's surprising how many people don't understand this. Accidents happen in the hotel garage. We provide the guests with the name of the person from the company that manages the garage to contact. Many guest insist on calling the police. We try to tell them they are wasting their (and the police's) time but they still call. The police come, tell them it's a civil matter & leave.
    My auto insurance card specifically states: YOU MUST CALL THE POLICE IMMEDIATELY AFTER AN ACCIDENT, AND HAVE A REPORT FILED.

    The police department states: I am not your do-boy, Insurance company, bite me.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    If the situation is not criminal in nature, then there is no purpose calling them.
    It's surprising how many people don't understand this. Accidents happen in the hotel garage. We provide the guests with the name of the person from the company that manages the garage to contact. Many guest insist on calling the police. We try to tell them they are wasting their (and the police's) time but they still call. The police come, tell them it's a civil matter & leave.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by S/O245
    You should try to have back up. But i know of times when they had no time. ANd i think thats when your training has to kick in and you have to make that quick decision. But if you can cleary see and know you cant really do anything then you should wait.
    Always keep in mind that the individual security officer working a post will not have access to back up. The local police are not your back up. The moment you call them, you have given them complete control of the situation and are only required to be present if they need you. If the situation is not criminal in nature, then there is no purpose calling them.

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  • S/O245
    replied
    You should try to have back up. But i know of times when they had no time. ANd i think thats when your training has to kick in and you have to make that quick decision. But if you can cleary see and know you cant really do anything then you should wait.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by histfan71
    You will be dead also by the time your back-up arrives if you try to intervene alone. The innocent civilian and you are dead, and the suspect escapes. What have you accomplished?
    My friends, let us not forget this one essential truth, we as an individual officer, public or private, have isolated and neutralized the scene. Then we wait for backup. When the person or persons are notified that any movement that threatens you will be delt with, the fight for the most part is over.
    If the subject or subjects takes off, description communicated, the response force are alerted and may apprehend the fleeing.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by bigdog
    Im really bad about breaking number 2 tombstone courage.
    If someones getting hurt or about to get hurt Im not gonna stand by and wait for backup they can be dead when my back up arrives.
    You will be dead also by the time your back-up arrives if you try to intervene alone. The innocent civilian and you are dead, and the suspect escapes. What have you accomplished?

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  • bigdog
    replied
    Im really bad about breaking number 2 tombstone courage.
    If someones getting hurt or about to get hurt Im not gonna stand by and wait for backup they can be dead when my back up arrives.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    It may sound trite, but aren't most accidents in the LE and SO professions a lapse of concentration, we forget for a moment our training and reaction? Our margin for error is so thin when we hold it up the light we can see through it.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    A lack of concentration certainly is a factor in some accidents. Other accidents are a result of poor judgment or the inability to recognize hazards due to being "safety challenged." Sometimes it the mistaken belief that "it won't happen to me" or even simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    May I add one more? Accidents. What I mean is this: For LE and sometimes security, many fatalities occur as a result of accidental death. Go to ODMP and read about the MANY officers who are killed, not with guns or knives, but with moving vehicles. It's getting to the point where the loss of life from such incidents rivals that from violent attacks. Absolutely senseless and sometimes, inexcusable fatal accidents.

    What about security? How many officers are killed or seriously injured from accidents while on duty? More than you might realize. Slip and fall, smoke or other toxic inhalation, burns, being crushed, heart attack from over-exertion, etc. So while we spend considerable time talking about officer safety as it relates to violence, let's not forget about the other big killer - accidents.
    It may sound trite, but aren't most accidents in the LE and SO professions a lapse of concentration, we forget for a moment our training and reaction? Our margin for error is so thin when we hold it up the light we can see through it.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    May I add one more? Accidents. What I mean is this: For LE and sometimes security, many fatalities occur as a result of accidental death. Go to ODMP and read about the MANY officers who are killed, not with guns or knives, but with moving vehicles. It's getting to the point where the loss of life from such incidents rivals that from violent attacks. Absolutely senseless and sometimes, inexcusable fatal accidents.

    What about security? How many officers are killed or seriously injured from accidents while on duty? More than you might realize. Slip and fall, smoke or other toxic inhalation, burns, being crushed, heart attack from over-exertion, etc. So while we spend considerable time talking about officer safety as it relates to violence, let's not forget about the other big killer - accidents.
    Your agency's insurance carrier has much to say about accidental death and employee safety. They barely acknoledge "officer safety," but they rigorously stress employee safety. Operation of fire extinguishers. Lifting with your knees, not your back. (Why are you lifting things instead of protecting the property, is beyond me...) HAZMAT identification. (OSHA HAZCOM)

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Deadly Sins (or mistakes)

    May I add one more? Accidents. What I mean is this: For LE and sometimes security, many fatalities occur as a result of accidental death. Go to ODMP and read about the MANY officers who are killed, not with guns or knives, but with moving vehicles. It's getting to the point where the loss of life from such incidents rivals that from violent attacks. Absolutely senseless and sometimes, inexcusable fatal accidents.

    What about security? How many officers are killed or seriously injured from accidents while on duty? More than you might realize. Slip and fall, smoke or other toxic inhalation, burns, being crushed, heart attack from over-exertion, etc. So while we spend considerable time talking about officer safety as it relates to violence, let's not forget about the other big killer - accidents.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Thanks N.A. The military, USAF in particular, push these things and the adoption of "Ten Deadly Sins" or the "Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement by the civilian sector will be a significant to not only civilian law enforcement but also to private security. Our mutual functions are to see the citizenry protected by public enforcement and private security all are able to go home at night.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:

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