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  • EMT certifications?

    Ok, I am looking to add EMT certs to my ever-growing list of job skills. Does anyone know what is necessary? Is it a state thing or are they nationally recognized? Any suggestions on training centers in Texas? I know I can do all this through google, but I prefer then input from someone who has actually been there.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Look for a recognized and accredited program, US DOT requires the course be a certain number of hours. In my state, you go through the program, usually a couple nights a week for 4 months. Then you get your written and practical Exam. If you pass you can sit for the national exam. (my program allowed the scores from the state practical to go to the nationals too)

    So long as you pass the original program struff you are state registered, if you pass the national you are both state and national registered.

    Certification is two years for each.

    Also generally you have to go EMT - B, EMT -I, then EMT - P but there are some programs that let you go from First Responder to EMT - P but you are looking at a two year program.

    Also you need current CPR/AED and First Aid before some programs will even admit you.
    Wisdom - Having a lot to say, but knowing when to keep it to yourself.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have come to discourage EMT certification for most Security Officers for several reasons based on personal experiance.
      First I point to the length of time for most EMT training. Anywhere from 120 to 160 hours depending on the class you take and the requirements of your state.
      Next, the need for regular Continuing Education and recertification. If you are not in a fire department, ambulance company or similar occupation it is often difficult to acquire the training necessary to keep your EMT certifications once you get them.
      Is your state one which requires National Regisitry? This may require additional training and paperwork to get certified where you live. There are additional requirements before the NR considers an EMT "ACTIVE", such as working in a healthcare or EMS role for a certain amount of time.

      Before I was an EMT I was a Medical First Responder. Many of the skills I learned as part of the MFR course are duplicated in the EMT text. Bandaging, splinting, administering O2 or doing CPR/AED are all part of the MFR class. The MFR clases generally run 40-60 hours. Many MFR classes are taught within a week or two. This is doable when you are trying to work a fulltime job.
      The cost of the MFR classes are a fraction of the cost of EMT classes and the number of Continuing Education hours as well as the length of the refresher classes are significantly less.
      I strongly recommend contacting your local Red Cross chapter and asking about a class they give called Emergency Response. On the Red Cross website it is described as-
      Emergency Response is a comprehensive course designed for training first responders. The course follows the 1995 US DOT First Responder National Standard Curriculum and meets ECC Guidelines.
      At the very least I believe that all SOs should have CPR/AED training but with the state of the Security industry here in the US I doubt that it will happen anytime soon.
      I'm not the only EMT on this board and I hope others chime in soon.
      Last edited by EMTGuard; 02-15-2008, 09:24 AM.
      Hospital Security Officer

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
        I have come to discourage EMT certification for most Security Officers for several reasons based on personal experiance.
        First I point to the length of time for most EMT training. Anywhere from 120 to 160 hours depending on the class you take and the requirements of your state.
        Next, the need for regular Continuing Education and recertification. If you are not in a fire department, ambulance company or similar occupation it is often difficult to acquire the training necessary to keep your EMT certifications once you get them.
        Is your state one which requires National Regisitry? This may require additional training and paperwork to get certified where you live. There are additional requirements before the NR considers an EMT "ACTIVE", such as working in a healthcare or EMS role for a certain amount of time.

        Before I was an EMT I was a Medical First Responder. Many of the skills I learned as part of the MFR course are duplicated in the EMT text. Bandaging, splinting, administering O2 or doing CPR/AED are all part of the MFR class. The MFR clases generally run 40-60 hours. Many MFR classes are taught within a week or two. This is doable when you are trying to work a fulltime job.
        The cost of the MFR classes are a fraction of the cost of EMT classes and the number of Continuing Education hours as well as the length of the refresher classes are significantly less.
        I strongly recommend contacting your local Red Cross chapter and asking about a class they give called Emergency Response. On the Red Cross website it is described as-

        At the very least I believe that all SOs should have CPR/AED training but with the state of the Security industry here in the US I doubt that it will happen anytime soon.
        I'm not the only EMT on this board and I hope others chime in soon.
        I took the First Responder course in the early 1970's then the EMT-A course. I agree with EMTGUARD.
        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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        • #5
          Here you can get EMT training at the local community college for relatively inexpensively.

          Not just cpr, but cpr for the professional rescuer which usually means you need basic cpr first.

          It is hard to keep the certification current. I renewed twice and then since I was no longer a related field I let it lapse. Kind of regret that, but its tough staying current.

          All in all though, I highly recommend it if you can. You'll realize just how little you get from a standard first aid class and even if you don't keep it current you'll have much more confidence if you ever have an emergency.

          Been a long time, but when I took the training it was only offered at the EMT-1A level here.

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          • #6
            EMTGuard

            Thanks for the tips. I have CPR/AED already. I just want to add the additional certs. I feel that we should all have a minimum of some training. I work some areas where we are pretty far out of the reach of EMS services and I consider the added training a comfort in case my partner or I need immediate medical attn. Now, I guess you are suggestig the MFR over the EMT? Would that suffice for a security officer? Most of what I'm looking at are GSW/KW, minor assault injuries and the like. Also, no one has answered this part yet: Are the certs recognized nationally or are they a state by state issuance? My CPR/AED cards do not indicate either.

            Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              All S/O's in Australia must have the compulsory 2 day first aid course which is CPR certified and lasts 3 years only. If you have kept it current you need to look at a 1 day refresher with a pees easy test which some buggers still fail.

              I think it was 140 odd hours all up to go to the equivalent of your EMT-B and this was another 40 hours to make it industrial level. For basic 1st aid, the average person receives a $10 US a week allowance but as security officers you get NOTHING. Hence why when it costs me $1k to renew the industrial level training, I let it lapse a few years ago as it was costing me 2 weeks off and I got nothing from it.
              "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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              • #8
                I believe the EMT certification is state by state, but some states ALSO require you to be Nationally Registered with a quasi-public body called the National EMS Registry or some such thing.

                Can someone tell me why, unless you are providing Emergency Medical Services under the direction of a Medical Doctor, you would need training beyond First Responder for Professional Rescuer as a security officer?
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #9
                  Well...

                  Can someone tell me why, unless you are providing Emergency Medical Services under the direction of a Medical Doctor, you would need training beyond First Responder for Professional Rescuer as a security officer?
                  I can't speak for anyone else, but I want it simply to get the most training I can.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes in Australia it depends on how far you are away from medical assistance so on a remote site you may also be the EMT level or industrial first aider due to the number of staff - like a school nurse I guess. I cannot recall the ratio but it was something like 1:50 staff for first level 1st aid and in my case the next level is useless as we have OOO (911) in a matter of minutes.
                    "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dougo83 View Post
                      Now, I guess you are suggestig the MFR over the EMT? Would that suffice for a security officer? Most of what I'm looking at are GSW/KW, minor assault injuries and the like.
                      Yes, that is what I'm suggesting. For a security officer who will not be routinely be working in a clinical environment or providing specific EMS duties for extra compensation I am of the opinion that MFR is more than adaquate. Otherwise the cost in money for classes and time spent certifying and recertifing doesn't add up.
                      Also, no one has answered this part yet: Are the certs recognized nationally or are they a state by state issuance? My CPR/AED cards do not indicate either.
                      Thanks
                      Each state has different requirements. Only 45 states recognize the National Registry certifications and not for all levels (basic, intermediate or paramedic). see- http://www.nremt.org/EMTServices/emt...te_offices.asp
                      Here in Louisiana you can take a EMT class at the Votech 2 -4 days a week. Everything from CPR on up is part of the class. No prerequsite. If you pass the class you are able to sit for a National Registry Of EMT written and practical skills test. If you pass the NREMT tast then you can apply for your State EMT certification.
                      Also, states may decide which skills they want certain level providers to practice. For instance, Just last year Louisiana EMS began allowing Basics to intubate using Combi-tubes. We also finally got the ability to carry and use Glucometers.
                      Of course, local protocals play a big part. Our purchase officer at the steel mill says Combi-tubes are too expensive so we won't have them regardless of our training. Our Nurse states that employees with diabetes should carry their own meter so we won't have those in our kits either.
                      Basics in other states have had these skills and tools available for several years.
                      You can spend several hundered dollars on tuition, books fees and several weeks or months getting your EMT certification only to have it lapse in 2 years because you are not able to obtain 48 hours of Continuing Education, a 48 hour refresher course and a medical director who can sign off on your paperwork stating that you have been working as an EMT for at least the last 6 months before your renewal. All for an employeer who isn't going to pay you a extra cent for having the cards in your wallet? No thanks.
                      Hospital Security Officer

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Where I work the fire department has excellent response times. Not much need for me to anything other than maybe control bleeding. On the other hand, my hobbies take me where response times are measured in hours. Thats where I like having some training and having my own equipment (basic trauma box). I saw a Jeep roll five times once and no one (other than me) had anything more than bandaids. Luckily he was only slightly injured but its those kind of situations where I'm glad to have some training.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Training is always good.

                          I have had my EMT for years. Here in PA you can renew with con ed and most of that comes from the inter net. That made it alot nicer than the old do or die (pass) recdert test. When I got the chance to interveiw new officer I always looked for EMS / Fire training (along with Security). With training like this it gives you a better understanding of interacting with these agencies when the worst happens. At the least if you have good first aid training you can help keep your partner or even yourself alive till the troops show up. I would love to see a trailor made Security Officer First Aid course offered along the lines of the Secert Service's 5 min medicine training.

                          Thanks

                          PAofficer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PAofficer View Post
                            I have had my EMT for years. Here in PA you can renew with con ed and most of that comes from the inter net. That made it alot nicer than the old do or die (pass) recdert test. When I got the chance to interveiw new officer I always looked for EMS / Fire training (along with Security). With training like this it gives you a better understanding of interacting with these agencies when the worst happens. At the least if you have good first aid training you can help keep your partner or even yourself alive till the troops show up. I would love to see a trailor made Security Officer First Aid course offered along the lines of the Secert Service's 5 min medicine training.

                            Thanks

                            PAofficer
                            There is already a course out there for people who, as part of their professional duties, rescue people and save lives until they are placed into the EMS system.

                            This course is given to police officers, RN/LPN students prior to clinicals, safety personnel at plants, and a whole slew of other people.

                            This course is called "First Responder for Professional Rescuers," and includes basic first aid, basic life support, CPR/Recue Breathing, use of the AED, and a few other things.

                            While one can create a purpose built course for security, it should be on a good solid foundation. Unless the security firm is specifically contracted to be an EMS provider, what good is the EMT-B/I or Para certification when you're not authorized to act as anything more than a Certified First Responder, or possibly a lay first aider by company policy.

                            There are places, yes, where they require the security force to be the first EMS provider agency. Indeed, there are probably places where the security/EMS force is actually a true EMS agency and transporting to the hospital on/off site.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I recently received my EMT-B. The main reason I went for it was simply to add to my resume and impress prospective employers. Also the contract security firm I work for, pays guards more money if they have an EMT cert. (and I think they charge the client more too.)

                              But what I didn't know was that most of the skills I learned can only be preformed under Medical Direction from an MD. Likewise if you don't have the nessasary equipment and supplies, you can't preform many of your skills.

                              As far as re-certs... I think I might work for an ambulance company part time to gain experience and meet the required continuing education.

                              But I have to recomend the trainning overall, it was a great experience
                              Police Officer

                              Experience: Bouncer, EMT, Theme Park Security, Money Transport, Armed Guard

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