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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I have only been with this company for a few weeks when this had it and I had already had a big argument with this clown for overstepping his mark a few times when he was telling me about the security industry. The former position holder had been fired for fraud and before I was in the chair the security function had been passed to him to babysit. He reported me and I got a rep for being a no-nonsense person but in reality, I don't need people who have never worked in our industry telling ME how things are.

    Oh it was an inside job by former terminated employees - who were dumb enough to drive distinctive cars.

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  • bigdog
    replied
    In our training now you are given about 1 hour discussion in the training package of the need to not touch anything and to ensure that NO-ONE touches anything until the police get there and take command of the scene. I once had a major argument with a Facilities Manager who thought he knew everything in the company I worked for. I told him if he took a step towards the crime scene I would arrest him for trespass and I had my handcuffs out (all bluff but the arrest would be real). We had a bloody big hole in the wall from a truck (semi) driving through and he was more worried about getting that fixed before the police even arrived on the scene.

    We were taught by S2 that if someone touched something in a crime scene after told not to touch anything we could arrest them for tampering with evidence a 3rd degree felony.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
    In our training now you are given about 1 hour discussion in the training package of the need to not touch anything and to ensure that NO-ONE touches anything until the police get there and take command of the scene. I once had a major argument with a Facilities Manager who thought he knew everything in the company I worked for. I told him if he took a step towards the crime scene I would arrest him for trespass and I had my handcuffs out (all bluff but the arrest would be real). We had a bloody big hole in the wall from a truck (semi) driving through and he was more worried about getting that fixed before the police even arrived on the scene.
    Admittedly, it's a major shift for people to suddenly realize that the place where they work every day is no longer just "the office" or "the factory", but now it's a "crime scene".

    It's an equally large shock to management to find that their movements are suddenly being restricted (by a security officer, no less!) in a place where they are normally accustomed to coming and going at will.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    If in your working environment you are required to have this and similiar training, or just want to broaden your skills, you might want to contact Jim Alsum, Director Public Agency Training Council, 5101 Decatur Blve, Ste. L, Indianapolis, IN 46241. Phone 1-800-365-0199. Email: [email protected] or David Huntress, American Trainco, PO Box 3397 Englewood, CO 80155. Phone 1-877-978-7246. Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.AmericanTrainco.com
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    In my younger days we would work in a 2 man K9 team and if into a possible hostile team we would run a dog into the area to conduct a search and come back. Now with cost cutting it is a sub-sub contractor who is usually running late by the time they get to the scene.

    In our training now you are given about 1 hour discussion in the training package of the need to not touch anything and to ensure that NO-ONE touches anything until the police get there and take command of the scene. I once had a major argument with a Facilities Manager who thought he knew everything in the company I worked for. I told him if he took a step towards the crime scene I would arrest him for trespass and I had my handcuffs out (all bluff but the arrest would be real). We had a bloody big hole in the wall from a truck (semi) driving through and he was more worried about getting that fixed before the police even arrived on the scene.

    I always made sure I had roll of barrier or safety tape (aka similar to POLICE LINE DO NOT CROSS) to assist with cordoning off a scene until Police arrive and take command of the scene. But many idiots go in wanting to play DIE HARD 5.0 - SECURITY GUARDS IN ACTION by stepping over things they know nothing of.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    The only 'true' Crime Scene Training I've received was during my reserve academy with Portland and with a casino/hotel in Nev. Other than that it has been hands off policy from most, if not all, of my employers/supervisors.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    Another thing, if its anything with blood or fluids, dead or alive, I'm wearing gloves before I touch anything.
    I've gone with the logic that if it's wet and not yours, don't touch it.

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahProtectionForce
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    Thank you. Most states do not seem to consider "crime scene management" an issue for security personnel, it seems. Everyone's either copying Florida or California for their security training, though, since a lot of the state security regulatory boards are part of IASIR.
    then you have Utah, and DOPL and PASCO

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Thank you. Most states do not seem to consider "crime scene management" an issue for security personnel, it seems. Everyone's either copying Florida or California for their security training, though, since a lot of the state security regulatory boards are part of IASIR.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Chaple
    replied
    Securitas offers only cursory training in crime scene managament. However, in one of my first criminal justice classes, our teacher issued each of us copies of a manual for police to use to train first responders (i.e. security guards, E.M.T.s, police patrol officers) in crime scene preservation. I have reviewed it several times and always keep it in my vehicle. While my hard copy is probably out of date, those of you interested in reviewing the information can find a more recent edition (but not much) online. http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/178280.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    It is possible to do you job and protect the crime scene. When I was with CDF they always said if you see a device at the fire scene, toss your hat over it, then continue on putting the fire out.

    Another thing, if its anything with blood or fluids, dead or alive, I'm wearing gloves before I touch anything.

    Theres no need to act like a bull in a china shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    There was some crime scene training in the state mandated training I took.

    This was a problem when I was an emt too. "But maybe he only looks dead". Sometimes you just back off and secure the scene (and I wish I had some flagging for that) but those other times you just try and preserve what you can while doing your job.
    My friend is an Investigator with the fire department. He knows they have to tear things down to put out the fire (Investigatos in Montreal have to be firefighters-in lots of other olaces they are members of the fire prevention branch of the service). But he gets really upset when they have done so much damage that he can't determine the cause of the fire. (The fact that the fire department removed the red flashers from their vehicles hasn't helped - the department decided there was no reason for them to respond as an emergency )

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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    As a young Detective one of the first things I learned when viewing a crime scene of a dead body - was it homicide or suicide?

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    There was some crime scene training in the state mandated training I took.

    This was a problem when I was an emt too. "But maybe he only looks dead". Sometimes you just back off and secure the scene (and I wish I had some flagging for that) but those other times you just try and preserve what you can while doing your job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    Did you recieve training from your state or your company on operating in potential crime scenes? Can you recongize a crime scene, and if so, do you know how to take steps to preserve it?

    Police Magazine has a very good article on "Crime Scene Response for the Patrol Officer," which focuses on initial response by law enforcement officers to the scene of a crime.

    This article mirrors the training that the State of Florida gives on Crime Scene Management for Private Security.

    Both stress such things as: Identify the elements of the crime scene, including secondary scenes. Secure the scene. Limit access. Preserve evidence using any means available - especially if the scene may be degraded by enviornment (snow/rain/wind/sun/etc). Begin an event log with accurate times.

    What crime scene training have you recieved, and if you haven't recieved any, what is your "gut instinct" about operating in a potential crime scene enviornment?

    This is something that has come up multiple times in my career. Everything from a welfare check on a resident turning into a forcible entry/burglary investigation to criminal traffic accidents. Knowing how to operate in the scene without causing massive disturbance is important - it allows us to complete our protective mission (Is the resident injured/dead/under attack?) vs. the law enforcement mission of investigating the criminal offense (Are there prints/door position/items disturbed).
    Nathan~
    CIS' SOPs basically mirrors the state's training. Identify the scene.....call LE.

    Leave a comment:

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