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  • Handcuffing

    More than likely all of you guys who carry handcuffs have been trained on their use (PATH - http://www.personalsafetytraining.com/path.php) and made aware of what to do and how to do what you are trying to do

    Here is a site with some basic information, but a good refresher for those who are new to carrying handcuffs or even those who have carried them for years.

    http://www.bondforfeitures.com/restraints.htm

    Taken from the text:

    Direct officers to give prompt attention to complaints that the cuffs are too tight - Even after using the "tip of the index finger test" and double-locking the cuffs, if the restrained person complains that the cuffs are too tight the officer should stop (if reasonably possible) and check the tightness of the cuffs. Even if the cuffs are properly applied the person could still have placed pressure on the cuffs or the person could have turned their hand within the cuff and caused constriction on part of the hand. If upon checking the cuffs the officer finds that the cuffs are at the appropriate tightness and there does not appear to be a problem the officer need not loosen the cuffs. However, the officer should document in his/her report that upon complaint the cuffs were checked.
    We just had a major handcuffing incident in one of our stores and have to go over training again and again to make sure our people stay sharp and reduce liability. The above text is several years old, but still applicable to our jobs.

    Stay safe and keep up the good work you do day in and out.
    Last edited by LPCap; 03-11-2007, 02:08 PM.

  • #2
    Unfortunately, while this is a subject of great importance there is little focus on use of handcuffs. Few of the smaller companies require any certification and I know in Missouri there are no statutory requirements for security officers to be certified on anything (other than a firearm) that they carry on their duty belt.

    The value of certifications domantely pertains to court testimony in the event you are accused of excessive use of force. Other than that, there is little value seen by others, which is the wrong way to view this important subject.

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    • #3
      You would think after all these years of using cuffs that someone would invent cuffs that were totally harmless like the Chinese finger cuffs.
      THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
      THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
      http://www.boondocksaints.com/

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      • #4
        As posted elsewhere in this forum, I guess we were fortunate when going through the Sheriff Academy in 1970. One of our instructors teaching the proper use of handcuffs had a 3 1/2 inch scar on his cheek received from a subject. Rachets can be very dangerous and destructive.
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Christopherstjo
          Unfortunately, while this is a subject of great importance there is little focus on use of handcuffs. Few of the smaller companies require any certification and I know in Missouri there are no statutory requirements for security officers to be certified on anything (other than a firearm) that they carry on their duty belt.

          The value of certifications domantely pertains to court testimony in the event you are accused of excessive use of force. Other than that, there is little value seen by others, which is the wrong way to view this important subject.
          This is usually due to the fact that you can possess weapons and restraints other than tasers and firearms without training, as a private citizen. The firearm is extraordinary, and its in the best interests of the state to regulate who gets heat.

          A good example is Florida, where the security officer has the same authority to carry anything but a gun that Sally Soccermom and Joe Sixpack do. It simply isn't regulated, nor do the states want to address regulation.

          Now, in states where a private citizen must be "trained" or "certified" to possess or go armed with a baton or nightstick or mace (California, Tennessee, Wisconsin), there are rules that security personnel must also be trained before being armed with such weapons. This is usually a rule violation on the part of security, and in come cases, a misdemeanor possession charge.

          It costs money to train. Some companies will order you to go spend a half grand at Galls, then throw you on the street. Less expensive that way, since you're buying it, and you're buying the training if you want it.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #6
            Check this out. These two were cuffed and belly-chains, which are meant to restrain the hands to the body.

            http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,290025,00.html
            THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
            THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
            http://www.boondocksaints.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              In CA, a private citizen needs no certification for oc anymore as long as its no more than 2.4oz.

              We spent a couple hours on handcuffing. Not enough but nothing gets covered in depth enough in a 40 hour course, but at least it was something.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chucky View Post
                Check this out. These two were cuffed and belly-chains, which are meant to restrain the hands to the body.

                http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,290025,00.html
                This is what happens when you let your guard down.......I would have given them a good ole fashion screen test by slamming on the brakes

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                • #9
                  The US Marshals Service's policy on transporting prisoners would have precluded that from happening. Handcuffs attached to the belly chain with the legs restrained with cuffs as well.
                  Years ago my partner and I had to take two individuals before the magistrate for an initial hearing. Since others had experienced trouble with them in previous encounters, we decided to handcuff them by their left wrists. They were required to do a shuffle when going from the cell block to the magistrate's office. Worked like a charm. Slow but safe.
                  We had a group of folks participate in the 1968 riots after MLK was murdered. We had a long time to wait for transportation to county jail. Our chief ordered they all be cuffed left wrist to right ankle. There is not a lot of movement when cuffed thusly
                  Giving anyone handcuffs without proper training is like giving a machine-gun to a monkey.
                  Enjoy the day,
                  Bill

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