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  • tlangsr
    replied
    Usmc

    Originally posted by Security Consultant
    From my own personal experience (USMC) nothing beats an etool for hand to hand combat.

    Semper Fi
    Luckily I never had to worry bout that, with my fire power the enemy would've never gotten close.

    Leave a comment:


  • adam12
    replied
    PPCT could be dangerous.

    Originally posted by tlangsr
    I have been trained in h2h combat through the corps, my pc832 classes, and ppct through my Extradition company. PPCT can be a very effective tool if you are properly trained and practice it. The subject MUST be able to comprehend pain, and some techniques may work on one person but not the other. I prefer the manidibular or the Orbital.
    Nothing wrong with pressure point control, of course. However, I personally don't like teaching it as a core component of any self defense course. PPCT (and assorted pain compliance techniques) are better suited to showing the potentially violent subject that he's better off not escalating the situation any further.

    The issue being, as you pointed out, what may work well against one person may not be at all effective against another, and when you're facing an actual violent aggressor, time is not on your side. There is not time for you to figure out which pressure points are going to work or not; you have to eliminate the threat immediately. No hesitation, no thought, and certainly no experimentation with pressure points.

    Of course, this may be what you were trying to say in the first place.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by tlangsr
    I have been trained in h2h combat through the corps, my pc832 classes, and ppct through my Extradition company. PPCT can be a very effective tool if you are properly trained and practice it. The subject MUST be able to comprehend pain, and some techniques may work on one person but not the other. I prefer the manidibular or the Orbital.
    From my own personal experience (USMC) nothing beats an etool for hand to hand combat.

    Semper Fi

    Leave a comment:


  • tlangsr
    replied
    Ppct

    I have been trained in h2h combat through the corps, my pc832 classes, and ppct through my Extradition company. PPCT can be a very effective tool if you are properly trained and practice it. The subject MUST be able to comprehend pain, and some techniques may work on one person but not the other. I prefer the manidibular or the Orbital.

    Leave a comment:


  • adam12
    replied
    It's really quite simple.

    All I really want to say on this subject is that when chosing a training program, make sure that the mind takes priority over the body.

    That is to say, beware any training course that teaches physical technique without paying a greater degree of attention to the psychology of the situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • adam12
    replied
    Exactly!

    Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
    The real martial artist generally has no comment and he's the unimpressive fellow standing in the corner silently, he's the fellow you would be smart to be scared of.
    I cannot begin to say how true this is. Being a skilled Martial Artist isn't about being fast or strong or knowing a thousand ultra-deadly techniques. It's about self control, maintaining a calm mind, and realizing that your options are usually far greater in number than you realize when you become fixated on applying violent, physical solutions.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Squidly
    Also there has been a rumor of all S/O and C/C to all be upgraded to Certificate III but I think that will be some time into the future since there are NO training organisations here to teach it.
    Squidly - I think that the International College for Advanced Education (ICAE) in Darwin (Suite 9, 24 Cavenagh Street) might handle Certificate III in Security Operations.

    Phone is 08 8941 5959.

    Here's their website: IAEC

    If you scroll down the page, you'll see they list Cert III in Sec Ops as one of their offerings, anyway.

    Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • ctbgpo
    replied
    Well I passed baton training. Like I thought we are not being issued them. Command staff just training us to satisfy a level 3 greivance. Looks like were gonna have to file another one to get them, and the spray that they trained us in and still haven't given us

    Leave a comment:


  • Squidly
    replied
    Sectrainer....
    All security officers and crowd controller must have Certificate II in Security Operations and a First Aid Certificate here in the Northen Territory (Australia)
    Course entails
    PRS20103: Certificate II in Security Operations
    Core (PRS20103 7 units)
    Code Name
    PRSSO201A Communicate effectively in the security industry
    PRSSO202A Maintain workplace safety
    PRSSO203A Work effectively in the security industry
    PRSSO204A Work as part of a team
    PRSSO205A Provide security services to customer
    PRSSO206A Provide first aid
    PRSSO207A Respond to security risk situation


    Most of this course though is not relevant to my area of work, being a S/O at the local hospital. We have been pushing for batons and handcuffs but so far to no avail. Recently some of us have been requesting the need for advanced First Aid and Resusitation primarily due to the level of work that we preform in the workplace.
    Also there has been a rumor of all S/O and C/C to all be upgraded to Certificate III but I think that will be some time into the future since there are NO training organisations here to teach it.

    http://www.ntis.gov.au/Default.aspx?...gpackage/PRS03
    This site has all of the security courses which are applicible for security in Australia

    Leave a comment:


  • ctbgpo
    replied
    I just found out today that on 2/10 my boss will finally be training us in the use of the asp baton.
    Now lets see if they actually issue it to us!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by james2go30
    Yea, careful here I may misspell some things, I am going to be taking ukujutsu soon...this style consists of combinations of karate, taekwon do, shoulin kung fu, tai chi, samurai swordsmanship( which that part I just like for personal reasons don't see samurai sword usage ever being needed in security just think its cool) ninjitsu, jujitsu and few other styles I can't remember off hand...I would also like to take some other defensive courses too.
    I recommend before adopting training at any particular martial arts school that you look at the actual training done in the school and make a determination of whether or not the training is practical for your needs or even realistic at all. Much of the martial arts, I would say up to 90% of it, is done in such a way that ingrains a preconditioned response to a preconditioned attack and that can serve some benefit, but can prove to be detrimental when faced with a real situation. Practicing too many techniques at a time will instill knowledge, but not necessarily ability. In many cases, less is actually more.
    Most American schools lack the proper amount of physical participation, but some are abundant with it. Also, evaluate the instructors' competency and moral character. Like with any other service, let the buyer beware.

    Leave a comment:


  • james2go30
    replied
    Yea.

    Yea, careful here I may misspell some things, I am going to be taking ukujutsu soon...this style consists of combinations of karate, taekwon do, shoulin kung fu, tai chi, samurai swordsmanship( which that part I just like for personal reasons don't see samurai sword usage ever being needed in security just think its cool) ninjitsu, jujitsu and few other styles I can't remember off hand...I would also like to take some other defensive courses too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marchetti, David, M
    replied
    The real martial artist generally has no comment and he's the unimpressive fellow standing in the corner silently, he's the fellow you would be smart to be scared of.

    Last edited by Marchetti, David, M; 01-23-2007, 11:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    A problem I have with my Officers is that they always want to use abbreviations. On the walkie-talkies the Housekeeping Supervisor is H-1, the Maintenance man on duty is M04, I' S-2 etc. My guys will write reports & in the report write "M04 was advised of the problem". I keep on telling them, people outside of the department that have to read the reports will have no idea who M04 is!
    I'd suggest you create a written standard for report-writing (this doesn't have to be very involved - the usual things about proper grammar, spelling, and prohibiting the use of jargon), explain it to your officers, perhaps with some examples of proper and improper reports, and advise them that in the future reports that violate the standard will be rejected and rewritten. Then, enforce it!

    (Incidentally, poor spelling is a much more pervasive problem IMHO than jargon. At least jargon doesn't make your organization look stupid. Make people use the dictionary or use the spell-checker in their word processor.) Other problems that are worse than jargon are: poor organization and incomplete information and reports should be rejected for these faults as quickly as for the use of jargon.

    There's nothing like having to rewrite a report to drive the point home.

    Leave a comment:


  • Miguel
    replied
    Legally I was required to get 16 hours of personal defense, but I only got 2 Since the academy belongs to the company and they see training as a mere expense, the contents and quality of it is way below the law requires.

    I´m interested in Krav Maga, but working these crazy hours I can´t really sing up for anything.

    20 years ago I took judo, and have very fond memories of it: it´s based in chokes and holds instead of strikes (lower chance to hurt the bad guy and end up in court), simple yet very effective techniques. I´ve been always bad at sports, except this one, so trust me when I say its techniques are simple.

    Leave a comment:

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