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  • #16
    I personally have had Tae Kwon Do and am currently a Brown Belt but have recently stop about a yr or two ago due to time. I have also been involed with folkstyle, freestyle and greco-roman wrestling ever since i was about 7 yrs old. im still involved, in fact now I coach it at the local YMCA for the Police Athletic League and a youth program in the NY-NJ area known as "Beat the Streets".

    I have also taken Combat handgunning and combat defensive tactics given by my instructors at Naval Field Operations training while i was attached with a unit down there.
    War is a continuation of politics by other means- Karl Von Clausewitz

    SO OTHERS MAY LIVE- US Navy Hospital Corpsman Motto
    HONOR, COURAGE, COMMITMENT- US NAVY Core Values

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    • #17
      Can you apply those general martial arts to the world of "defensive tactics" where you must only use the proper and reasonable amount of force to terminate reistance or defend yourself from a non-lethal threat?

      Most civilian self defense courses assume that the person being attacked is in fear for their life, and justify any amount of force, as a person in fear for their life is granted the right to use deadly force to protect themselves.

      This is where you get groin kicks, gouging out eyes, etc.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dam Guard
        Did they teach this technique? This about the only video I have seen on the web of the brachial stun technique.
        http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...imp+slap&hl=en

        Not exactly like that! The technique was to attack the brachial

        plexus clavicle notch, but only when confronting individuals or groups such as

        demonstrators who are not violently resisting.
        "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
        - Thomas Jefferson

        “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”
        — Vince Lombardi

        "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

        IX. Strive to attain professional competence.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
          Can you apply those general martial arts to the world of "defensive tactics" where you must only use the proper and reasonable amount of force to terminate reistance or defend yourself from a non-lethal threat?

          Most civilian self defense courses assume that the person being attacked is in fear for their life, and justify any amount of force, as a person in fear for their life is granted the right to use deadly force to protect themselves.

          This is where you get groin kicks, gouging out eyes, etc.
          But then as you develop your skills you learn to control your intensity. You do not have to use maiming counters but progress from defensive (blocking, diverting) to more aggressive reactions. As in anything your response comes from past experience and training

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          • #20
            True, but whatever you're doing has to be legally defensible, and you have to articulate it in terms of "reasonable force," just like a police officer. Especially if you move from defense to arrest, where you become the (legally authorized) aggressor and the person tries to defend themselves (illegaly) against your attack.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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            • #21
              Even if you turn it into just short of a Cluster **** and you have a good attorney and are articulate enough and the other guy is a Duh you can come out clean. Wouldn'twant to rely on that but it does happen.

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              • #22
                I just finished taking a instructors course from the folks at Hawk East. 1 trainer was a full time N.C. State Trooper, another was a N.C. S.W.A.T. officer.

                They are also involved and run http://www.team-roc.com/


                Great training.

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                • #23
                  Hi folks

                  Originally posted by Dam Guard
                  The strikes PPCT teaches
                  What does the acronym PPCT mean?

                  Mark
                  I'm not old, I'm worn.

                  http://www.geocities.com/juszczec/shawJCCkarate.html

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                  • #24
                    P-ressure
                    P-oint
                    C-ontrol
                    T-actics

                    Was founded By Bruce Sidell, relies on pressure points to combat mostly passive resistance (tensing, bracing, pulling away, etc)

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                    • #25
                      I have learned over the years that being able to articulate in writing (N.A is sooo right) makes defending yourself much easier, especially on Monday morning when the boss comes in after his nice relaxing weekend of.

                      For example
                      I delivered a "Tactical strike to the Green Zone, disabling the party long enough for me to remove the weapon, place the offending party in restraints and take him into custody."

                      Doesn't that sound better than I kicked him in his junk, he dropped the needle he was holding I fell on top of him til somebody arrived with cuffs to hookim up.
                      Last edited by ctbgpo; 01-05-2007, 05:56 PM.

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                      • #26
                        There's a balance, though. Most report writing classes note that you should not use technical jargon (cop shop talk) in your reports, mainly because the audience (who aren't police/security) don't understand what you're conveying.

                        Tailor the report to its potential end user. In our job, clients may have to read that report, and will be on the phone going, "Why doesn't the security guard write in English?" Again, balance.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                        • #27
                          A problem I have with my Officers is that they always want to use abbreviations. On the walkie-talkies the Housekeeping Supervisor is H-1, the Maintenance man on duty is M04, I' S-2 etc. My guys will write reports & in the report write "M04 was advised of the problem". I keep on telling them, people outside of the department that have to read the reports will have no idea who M04 is!
                          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                          • #28
                            Legally I was required to get 16 hours of personal defense, but I only got 2 Since the academy belongs to the company and they see training as a mere expense, the contents and quality of it is way below the law requires.

                            I´m interested in Krav Maga, but working these crazy hours I can´t really sing up for anything.

                            20 years ago I took judo, and have very fond memories of it: it´s based in chokes and holds instead of strikes (lower chance to hurt the bad guy and end up in court), simple yet very effective techniques. I´ve been always bad at sports, except this one, so trust me when I say its techniques are simple.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by HotelSecurity
                              A problem I have with my Officers is that they always want to use abbreviations. On the walkie-talkies the Housekeeping Supervisor is H-1, the Maintenance man on duty is M04, I' S-2 etc. My guys will write reports & in the report write "M04 was advised of the problem". I keep on telling them, people outside of the department that have to read the reports will have no idea who M04 is!
                              I'd suggest you create a written standard for report-writing (this doesn't have to be very involved - the usual things about proper grammar, spelling, and prohibiting the use of jargon), explain it to your officers, perhaps with some examples of proper and improper reports, and advise them that in the future reports that violate the standard will be rejected and rewritten. Then, enforce it!

                              (Incidentally, poor spelling is a much more pervasive problem IMHO than jargon. At least jargon doesn't make your organization look stupid. Make people use the dictionary or use the spell-checker in their word processor.) Other problems that are worse than jargon are: poor organization and incomplete information and reports should be rejected for these faults as quickly as for the use of jargon.

                              There's nothing like having to rewrite a report to drive the point home.
                              "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                              "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                              "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                              "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                              • #30
                                The real martial artist generally has no comment and he's the unimpressive fellow standing in the corner silently, he's the fellow you would be smart to be scared of.

                                Last edited by Marchetti, David, M; 01-23-2007, 11:12 PM.

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