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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by dio_mack
    yeah you're right, its true,
    See post #8.

    Leave a comment:


  • dio_mack
    replied
    Originally posted by LavianoTS386
    If you're patroling private property those laws do not apply.

    yeah you're right, its true,

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    Mine was a t-bone accident and my head didn't go through the driver side window.
    Consider yourself fortunate. Obviously there are many variables in a collision, including speed, vehicle size/weight/design, and so forth. Nevertheless, the Internet has plenty of video to verify my statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    And how!! Even w/ a seatbelt, your head will go through the driver's side window in a "T-bone" accident and may even dent the hood of the vehicle that hits you. That means hemorrhaging and brain swelling/pressure inside the skull with brain damage and/or death as a result.
    Mine was a t-bone accident and my head didn't go through the driver side window.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    It's amazing how much damage someone's head can do to a windshield when a seatbelt isn't used.
    And how!! Even w/ a seatbelt, your head will go through the driver's side window in a "T-bone" accident and may even dent the hood of the vehicle that hits you. That means hemorrhaging and brain swelling/pressure inside the skull with brain damage and/or death as a result.

    Leave a comment:


  • T202
    replied
    It's amazing how much damage someone's head can do to a windshield when a seatbelt isn't used.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    I thank you for your opinion, but I've learned differently from psychologists that taught in my EMT class and from what I've learned in continuing education in EMS. I'll stick with the advice of licensed psychological professionals.

    Can I ask what type of field you were working in that you've have the opportunity to arrive home and hug your children with smeared dried blood on your uniform? I've been in EMS for 5 years and security for 4 and have never once arrived home with blood on my uniforms.
    Jackhole:
    I was functioning as a police officer, Colerain Township, Hamilton County Ohio on weekends and at night. You go to work in a uniform and come home the same way. Our office was the size of a large "walk-in" closet. You see a lot of bad stuff first hand and it changes your perspective on life and contemporary values. You have a greater appreciation of human life and how very frail it is.
    During the day I was an Ohio Air National Security Police Technician for a KC-97L Tanker Group. After spending 22 days short of 10 years on the active force, I wanted to keep my hand in. I got into the security inspection business for the Air Force Reserve in Georgia and stayed in that business through postings with Army, Navy, Army again and finally with the US Marshals Service. All building blocks for well rounded security career.
    Thanks for asking.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I know I'm derailing this thread, so let me just say this and then we can continue via PM if need be:

    There is a difference between credulity (blind belief) and faith (belief based on evidence though not beheld). What I mean is that you believe in the wind, not because you see it, but because you see and feel its effect. It's similar w/electricity and I could use other examples as well. Also, there is a big difference between organized religion and what the Bible actually teaches. At any rate, I'll leave it at that and we can all get back to the proven benefit of wearing seatbelts.
    Sounds good. I don't refute the benefit of seat belts at all and wholly support their use. It's my fault for derailing the thread in the first place.

    Carry on...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    More often than I'd like, but it's better than blindly believing in something that probably never existed in the first place. Organized religion has never changed their advice over the years because there's no system of checks and balances - no way to prove anyone wrong. It's easy to always be right when you're making it up as you go along.
    I know I'm derailing this thread, so let me just say this and then we can continue via PM if need be:

    There is a difference between credulity (blind belief) and faith (belief based on evidence though not beheld). What I mean is that you believe in the wind, not because you see it, but because you see and feel its effect. It's similar w/electricity and I could use other examples as well. Also, there is a big difference between organized religion and what the Bible actually teaches. At any rate, I'll leave it at that and we can all get back to the proven benefit of wearing seatbelts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Then be prepared to constantly change your understanding of the right way to do things as the years pass. After all, how many times have the "professional psychologists" had to admit that their advice/counsel was wrong?
    More often than I'd like, but it's better than blindly believing in something that probably never existed in the first place. Organized religion has never changed their advice over the years because there's no system of checks and balances - no way to prove anyone wrong. It's easy to always be right when you're making it up as you go along.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    I thank you for your opinion, but I've learned differently from psychologists that taught in my EMT class and from what I've learned in continuing education in EMS. I'll stick with the advice of licensed psychological professionals.........
    Then be prepared to constantly change your understanding of the right way to do things as the years pass. After all, how many times have the "professional psychologists" had to admit that their advice/counsel was wrong?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    I don't like to cloud my mind with the whimsical stories of fiction that are religous scripts. I prefer to get my advice from non-fiction reading, thanks.
    That's a pretty "gloomy" outlook there, Jackhole.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by ACP01
    I just retired after 20 years as an FD Captain. (30SEPT)
    Congratulations!

    Leave a comment:


  • ACP01
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Mr. Security that is not the half of it. I had to tell two young children there mother was asleep, resting confortably. My car captain tied a beautiful bow under the dead woman's chin and tied it on the top of her head after he replaced the top of her head.
    The next worst thing is responding to a car fire with trapped occupants. You break the smallest hole you can and push in the business end of the extinguisher. The smell of burned flesh is something that some 45 years later is still fresh in the nostrils. Carrying dead children from a scene is the most horrific. When it is caused by a drunk driver the rage you feel is almost too much to bear. We sometimes wonder, but in reality we know, why cops eat their guns after so many years or turn to the bottle. The bottle doesn't work, I tried it! ER, fire rescue and cops are now scheduled for mandatory counselling. It is about time.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    Bill as usual you nailed it.
    I just retired after 20 years as an FD Captain. (30SEPT)
    I can only think of a very very few times a person wearing a seatbelt was killed and those wrecks were so bad the Presidents limo would probably have been finished.

    I personally have survived a head-on collision in my POV because I was wearing a seatbelt. My brother an LE Sgt. was thrown out of his car in a rollover because he WASN'T wearing his. He lived and is back on duty but it was touch and go for a long time.

    Most accidents happen close to home and at relatively low speeds.
    Parking lot speeds can kill you.

    Wear your seatbelt anytime you are in a vehicle. All it takes is once.

    Be careful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Actually, it's Scriptural. See (Eccl. 9:5)
    I don't like to cloud my mind with the whimsical stories of fiction that are religous scripts. I prefer to get my advice from non-fiction reading, thanks.

    Leave a comment:

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