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    Jackhole
    Member

  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Jackhole:
    You do what you have to do with little, I mean little children to calm them down and get them out of the area. It takes a professional counsellor to discuss death to a toddler, worse if there are two of them. Remember, it is always and stages of a child's growth. I asked our chaplain, an old Irish priest, if what I said was appropriate. He told me it was and whatever I did, don't be afraid to cry and let it all out, which I did. It makes you hug your children a little tighter when you first see them. When they saw dried smears, blood, on my uniform and asked what it was, the answer was always "mud."
    Now adays, counselling is always available. Sometimes you have to seek it other times it is just there. The military now almost forces it upon service personnel, much to their credit.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    I thank you for your opinion, but I've learned differently from psychologists that taught in my EMT class and from what I've learned in continuing education in EMS. I'll stick with the advice of licensed psychological professionals.

    Can I ask what type of field you were working in that you've have the opportunity to arrive home and hug your children with smeared dried blood on your uniform? I've been in EMS for 5 years and security for 4 and have never once arrived home with blood on my uniforms.
    Jackhole
    Member
    Last edited by Jackhole; 10-01-2006, 09:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    Not to criticize, but euphamisms should never be used when telling someone a loved one is dead. It serves no useful purpose in the grief stages.
    Where? I was a volunteer firefighter and EMT for 5 years and have seen some pretty terrible accident scenes and medical calls. Not once was I ever offered any type of counseling, mandatory or otherwise.
    Actually, it's Scriptural. See (Eccl. 9:5)

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Mr. Security that is not the half of it. I had to tell two young children there mother was asleep, resting confortably. My car captain tied a beautiful bow under the dead woman's chin and tied it on the top of her head after he replaced the top of her head.
    The next worst thing is responding to a car fire with trapped occupants. You break the smallest hole you can and push in the business end of the extinguisher. The smell of burned flesh is something that some 45 years later is still fresh in the nostrils. Carrying dead children from a scene is the most horrific. When it is caused by a drunk driver the rage you feel is almost too much to bear. We sometimes wonder, but in reality we know, why cops eat their guns after so many years or turn to the bottle. The bottle doesn't work, I tried it! ER, fire rescue and cops are now scheduled for mandatory counselling. It is about time.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    Painful thoughts, but very true. Recently, my area has been plagued with some serious automobile accidents. Sadly, people continue to drive in a reckless manner. It can be difficult to see justice carried out because jurors are often guilty of the same driving offenses that didn't result in accidents. They tend to relate to the offender because they know if it weren't for circumstances they would be the one sitting in the defendant’s chair. Light sentences are usually imposed because it was an "accident" even though the end result is often the same as for someone who was careless with a firearm.

    If the fatality rate on the highway existed within the airline industry, there would be outrage and demands for a change. Somehow, it's acceptable to society on the road.

    Leave a comment:

  • Bill Warnock
    Senior Member

  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    Not to criticize, but euphamisms should never be used when telling someone a loved one is dead. It serves no useful purpose in the grief stages.

    Where? I was a volunteer firefighter and EMT for 5 years and have seen some pretty terrible accident scenes and medical calls. Not once was I ever offered any type of counseling, mandatory or otherwise.
    Jackhole:
    You do what you have to do with little, I mean little children to calm them down and get them out of the area. It takes a professional counsellor to discuss death to a toddler, worse if there are two of them. Remember, it is always and stages of a child's growth. I asked our chaplain, an old Irish priest, if what I said was appropriate. He told me it was and whatever I did, don't be afraid to cry and let it all out, which I did. It makes you hug your children a little tighter when you first see them. When they saw dried smears, blood, on my uniform and asked what it was, the answer was always "mud."
    Now adays, counselling is always available. Sometimes you have to seek it other times it is just there. The military now almost forces it upon service personnel, much to their credit.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:

  • Jackhole
    Member

  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Mr. Security that is not the half of it. I had to tell two young children there mother was asleep, resting confortably.
    Not to criticize, but euphamisms should never be used when telling someone a loved one is dead. It serves no useful purpose in the grief stages.
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    ER, fire rescue and cops are now scheduled for mandatory counselling. It is about time.
    Where? I was a volunteer firefighter and EMT for 5 years and have seen some pretty terrible accident scenes and medical calls. Not once was I ever offered any type of counseling, mandatory or otherwise.

    Leave a comment:

  • Bill Warnock
    Senior Member

  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Amazing picture. I often think of the first responders to automobile and aviation accidents and the dread that they must feel inside knowing that what they see will be forever etched in their mind's eye. To any security, police, ems, medics, and FD members who handle such accidents: Thank You.
    Mr. Security that is not the half of it. I had to tell two young children there mother was asleep, resting confortably. My car captain tied a beautiful bow under the dead woman's chin and tied it on the top of her head after he replaced the top of her head.
    The next worst thing is responding to a car fire with trapped occupants. You break the smallest hole you can and push in the business end of the extinguisher. The smell of burned flesh is something that some 45 years later is still fresh in the nostrils. Carrying dead children from a scene is the most horrific. When it is caused by a drunk driver the rage you feel is almost too much to bear. We sometimes wonder, but in reality we know, why cops eat their guns after so many years or turn to the bottle. The bottle doesn't work, I tried it! ER, fire rescue and cops are now scheduled for mandatory counselling. It is about time.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    I feel it when I get a call for a room with a double lock on, no connecting doors & the guest does not answer the phone. The last time he was simply dead from drug overdose in bed, the one before him was hanging on the back of the bathroom door
    Yikes!!!!...

    Leave a comment:

  • HotelSecurity
    Senior Member

  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Amazing picture. I often think of the first responders to automobile and aviation accidents and the dread that they must feel inside knowing that what they see will be forever etched in their mind's eye. To any security, police, ems, medics, and FD members who handle such accidents: Thank You.
    I feel it when I get a call for a room with a double lock on, no connecting doors & the guest does not answer the phone. The last time he was simply dead from drug overdose in bed, the one before him was hanging on the back of the bathroom door

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    35 mph of damage. A lack of a seat belt would have been a disaster.
    Amazing picture. I often think of the first responders to automobile and aviation accidents and the dread that they must feel inside knowing that what they see will be forever etched in their mind's eye. To any security, police, ems, medics, and FD members who handle such accidents: Thank You.

    Leave a comment:

  • Jackhole
    Member

  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by histfan71
    Maybe attitudes of "entitlement" are why you can't get hired as a cop.
    I wonder what attitudes kept you from keeping your job as a cop. I have a friend who is currently a Sergeant with your department and he says most of the officers are rejects (fired from PDs in the states) and has-beens. Which one are you?

    I rarely take the time to personally attack people on forums like this, but I've had enough of your condescending tone to people on here. We get it already - you're a cop (barely) and we're not. What are you doing posting on this forum anyway? Your only purpose seems to be to berate us for our chosen (or current) profession. Sounds like you're the one with an attitude.

    Leave a comment:

  • 1stWatch
    Member

  • 1stWatch
    replied
    35 mph of damage. A lack of a seat belt would have been a disaster.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    I wrote about taxi drivers because they do have to wear them on highways.
    And even IF seatbelts don't have to be worn, you could end up "dead right."

    Leave a comment:

  • HotelSecurity
    Senior Member

  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by LavianoTS386
    If you're patroling private property those laws do not apply.
    I wrote about taxi drivers because they do have to wear them on highways.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    I had the unfortunate circumstance of having a patrol wreck a few days ago. The car I was driving was made inoperable, but I was not injured at all. I would certainly have been hurt if I was not wearing a safety belt and if I would have been driving faster than I was. The value of the seat belt is just a no-brainer to me.

    Still, though, I see many out there who believe they are able to function more effectively without wearing it. A lot of cops and security patrol I know of both tend not to wear the seat belt on inner city streets where the speed limit is 40 mph or less. The common excuse I hear is "what if I have to bail out to chase somebody?". The thing only takes half a second to disengage and can be done at the same time you place the vehicle in park.
    It seems the real reason many cease to wear it is when they feel powerful and have an unrealistic sense of entitlement to not wear it. My wreck happened at 30 miles per hour and the car is all but destroyed. I have no doubt I would not be here now to type this if I was not wearing the safety belt. I shall always remember to put it on.
    Exactly. The belt can even be released as you roll up on the scene before parking. Glad you're OK.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mr. Security
    Senior Member

  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by LavianoTS386
    If you're patroling private property those laws do not apply.
    True. Nevertheless, many if not most security companies require you to wear them while on duty.

    Leave a comment:

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