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And LEOs talk about Security?

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  • And LEOs talk about Security?

    While watching a FoxNews account of the manhunt for the guy that shot 3 NY State troopers killing one I saw a Trooper do something REALLY dumb.

    The segment showed a heavyset NYSP holding a riot gun with the barrell resting on his hip, the barrell pointed up. Not bad but....
    When he opened a trunk of a car to look for the cop killer the gun was in the same position! STUPID!

    What would have happened if the BG WAS in the trunk? We would be reading about anouther officer down as there is no way in h3ll that trooper could have got the gun aimed in time.

    The segment showed another search by our spaced out buddy holding the gun the same way but this time another NYSP whose head was in the game was covering with a riotgun mounted and aimed.

    Friends, one sure way to end up dead or crippled is to not be alert ALL the time. H3ll yes repetitive actions are boring to the point of being mind-numbing but that is the time things go bad.

    So please pay attention and to it the right way.

  • #2
    They say that from 7-10 year mark, you're most likely to die. Cause you've been doing it so long nobody's gonna question your (bad) habits, not even yourself.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ACP01
      The segment showed a heavyset NYSP holding a riot gun with the barrell resting on his hip, the barrell pointed up.
      Poor tactics on the part of the trooper, I agree. However, how could the barrell of the shotgun rest on his hip AND point up at the same time. Did you perhaps mean to say that the STOCK of the shotgun was resting on the trooper's hip?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by histfan71
        Poor tactics on the part of the trooper, I agree. However, how could the barrell of the shotgun rest on his hip AND point up at the same time. Did you perhaps mean to say that the STOCK of the shotgun was resting on the trooper's hip?
        Ok LOL, meant stock, was still crosseyed from watching the trooper trying to commit Suicide-by-Stupidity.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
          They say that from 7-10 year mark, you're most likely to die. Cause you've been doing it so long nobody's gonna question your (bad) habits, not even yourself.
          Statistics seem to confirm that on the ODMP.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            It goes to show that one of the biggest battles we fight, whether you are in security or law enforcement, is Complacency. It can and will kill you. Complacency is defined as a feeling of quiet pleasure or security, often while unaware of some potential danger, defect, or the like; self-satisfaction or smug satisfaction with an existing situation, condition, etc.

            When you are new, complacency isn't really an issue. You are for lack of a better word, paranoid. Over time, the things that used to make you feel paranoid give into complacency and you let your guard down. It is perfectly alright to be a little paranoid, because it is what will keep you alive.

            One could argue it was poor training that caused the Trooper to conduct himself in such a manner, but honestly I think he was the victim of complacency. After searching a few hundred cars, you are going to get tired and the "routine" is what will keep you going.

            Bottom line... Stay aware of your surroundings and don't fall victim to our deadly enemy, Complacency.
            "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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            • #7
              Good points Davis. Also rotation of the troops would help.
              If the guy was rotated with another trooper doing road patrol or any other assignment then there would be much less problems.

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              • #8
                Nothing we ever do in either security or law enforcement is ever "Routine." Routine is a thing that can and does get one dead, and as we all know, the path back from dead is long and unending.
                Every call, traffic stop or posting think, the FBI's Most Wanted is there so be aware, on guard accordingly!
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill

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                • #9
                  Rut

                  Definition: A grave with both ends kicked out.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mr. Security
                    Definition: A grave with both ends kicked out.
                    Good point Mr. Security. Sometimes I use the analogy, "The difference between a rut and a grave is depth."
                    Enjoy the day,
                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                      Nothing we ever do in either security or law enforcement is ever "Routine." Routine is a thing that can and does get one dead, and as we all know, the path back from dead is long and unending.
                      Every call, traffic stop or posting think, the FBI's Most Wanted is there so be aware, on guard accordingly!
                      Enjoy the day,
                      Bill
                      So true Bill.
                      I saw in the paper about a Vice cop was flagged down by a hooker.
                      He took her to a parking lot and began to discuss prices.
                      She asked if he was PD and he answered no.

                      She siad SHE was, slapped cuffs on him and started calling "Move in" on a handheld radio.
                      She was not LEO but had an accomplice parked nearby.

                      A "routine" vice bust almost went very bad.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                        Nothing we ever do in either security or law enforcement is ever "Routine."
                        I hear that a lot from Security and Law Enforcement officers, and while it is a good thought, I disagree with it. I think there are a lot of things that are "routine", but the fatal error is expecting the routine.

                        I.e. for security; you walk up to an area you patrol every night. Your job is to lock a fence gate, turn on an overhead light and make sure no one is hiding under a trailer. Now lets say some day you go about doing this, you walk into the area, lock the gate, turn on the light, check under the trailer and no one is there. That was a routine patrol.
                        Now, when you go on this patrol expecting to be able to lock up the gate, turn on the light and check under the trailer, knowing that nothing is going to be there. That is where your fatal error is.

                        I.e. for Law enforcement; you have done about a hundred traffic stops in the past. The "routine traffic stop" is one where you spot a violating vehicle, stop the car, get the driver's info get back to your car, write out the cite/warning, then go back to the driver and issue said cite/warning/verbal and the driver is on their way. That was a routine traffic stop. Now it is the time you hit those overhead lights "knowing" that the driver isnt going to shoot you in the face, or there isnt going to be a bonafide gang member in the backseat, or a gorilla that will escape from the trunk, that is where you've made your fatal error.

                        Just my .02
                        "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                        "The Curve" 1998

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