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  • Training Topics, Ideas, Coverage, Concepts?

    I thought I would throw this out here, as our department trains very rigorousely, and continually. It can sometimes be difficult to come up with new ideas, and ideas we may have overlooked.

    What Training blocks would be good to cover in our field of Operation?

    What areas are overlooked and should be covered?

    What training aids would be helpful?

    What resources have you used in training blocks? Who, what and where?

    What important topics should be covered?

    What training types should be utilized?

    We use a multitude, but it never hurts to get input from everyone, as so we can all raise the standards of professionalism and proficiency!
    Deputy Sheriff

  • #2
    Complacency

    This is a big danger for both LE and security. I see it w/ the way police respond to residential alarms and traffic stops. In our town, 99.9999 (you get the idea ) of it is routine. Humans get accustomed to potentially dangerous situations/encounters when nothing happens for a while.

    Sooner or later, though, the inevitable happens and it becomes a matter of life or death. If your security officers have a measure of fear when responding to a call, it means that their guard is up and they are on alert. If they are completely confident and at ease, then complacency may be creeping up on them.

    If you can figure out a way to test them w/ the unexpected, you'll help them avoid this pitfall.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

    Comment


    • #3
      There are three topics that I think should be refreshed at least yearly. If you can do them quarterly, or even semi-annually, that is even better. They are:

      1. Communication Skills
      2. Defensive Tactics/Arrest and Control Techniques
      3. Legal and Policy/Procedures Update

      I normally include firearms in the list, but your mall does not carry guns.

      I also highly recommend using reality-based training scenarios as the "final exam" at the end of the training block. In just one scenario the guard can demonstrate his proficiency in all three topics.

      Comment


      • #4
        I discussed the idea of reality based scenerios with my senior officers tonight. And this is probably the best idea as it may keep them on their toes. We discussed conducting a "weapons" check, in which they turn in their spray prior to going out, for inspection, then give them an inert model, with chemical markings, as to not raise any suspicous intents. Then send them out, and send them on a call to a "pre-set up" store location, with everyone but the responding officer, in on the storyline. Excite it a little, and test the officer. This would give them the realism, as they wouldnt know any different, and if they go to defensive measures, no one would be sprayed or caused serious harm in the effects of defensive training.

        Initially it sounded risky, but under a controlled environment, with they key ability to shut down at any time when enough was enough, and the officer being the blind subject to the scenerio, it would give a very real world experience that will help them determine themselves and abilities!
        Deputy Sheriff

        Comment


        • #5
          You should not set up a training scenario with the responding guard not realizing it is training. At the very least, when the guard arrives at the "call", let him know it is not a real situation, but a training scenario. This reduces the chances of injury to both the guard and the role-players. You can still have "real-world experience" even though the guard knows it is all scripted. Depending upon the actions of the guard, the role-players can ad-lib a little, but be careful not to let it get out of hand and stray too far from the script.

          Also, you should NEVER EVER switch labels on an inert OC canister with a live canister, or vice versa. It will be too easy to confuse them, and you will eventually have a guard go on patrol with inert OC and someone in a training scenario gets sprayed with live OC.

          Finally, the role-players will need some sort of protective equipment, especially if the scenario calls for the guard to use force to resolve the scenario. Red-Man suits and their clones work best, but I realize that you may not have them in your inventory. Perhaps you can ask to borrow one or two from the local PD, if you have such a good relationship with them as you claim. Mats are also a necessity if you plan on having your guards do any type of take-downs and/or control holds. I know from first hand experience that being taken down on a hard floor hurts

          I recommend that you read Training at the Speed of Life, you can get it from Amazon.com, because it will help you to create realistic yet safe training scenarios. Good luck and let me know how it turns out.

          Comment


          • #6
            I totally agree with histfan71 on the issue of not setting up a scenario where the officer is unaware that it is a training scenario. It is too fraught with the potential for injury to someone. This would possibly result in someone (or two) ending up on workers compensation.

            In your situation I would try and work with one of the stores to utilize their facility after closing time to give you a real world setting, incorporating safety equipment into the setting (mats, protective gear, etc.).

            We have scenarios based training exercises on our team every month, usully spending two hours in running officers through scenarios based upon real cases we have dealt with. This gives us the chance to observe and work with our officers while at the same time challenging them to handle situations which they will likely face in real life. Not to mention we may learn better ways of handling things in the future.

            Good luck and practice safe.
            "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

            Comment


            • #7
              Fortunately, I have a blank store to use, and different reality tools. The basis I was following for realisim minus awareness, was brought on by Military training procedures that are conducted. In controlled environments, with the availability to "kill switch" it at any time, before things get too heated, its a great tool, as the real deffects come out, where in a non blind scenerio, people will function differently, than if under concept of realism. The inert over actual, is safety barrier for individual loss of control, which is something that I personally would like to know the limits of the individual. I of course dont want things to escilate to that point, as the switch would be thrown. Just additional safety.

              The one key thing I have taken from experience, is that the most realistic training complied and available to anyone, will provide measuring tools, and self actualization of skills. I had this done so many times to myself while serving, then to actually have to use the realistic training I recieved in actual combat made a difference. I am always looking for ways to challenge, push and test the staff I have, not only to ensure we are on top of things, but to help each of them individually realise they have what it takes, being confident, and taking home some pride that they are "Trained Professionals".

              So, onto other ideas... I recently was able to get PD to give a course on Officer Safety Awareness concerning edged weapons, and it was fantastic, as I could see the reaction from a few of my people, that it had hit home. Officer Safety Awareness is very important, as we can never under estimate the subjects we come in contact with.

              Anyone else hit a block of training they found useful or enlightening?
              Deputy Sheriff

              Comment


              • #8
                Do you have access to one of the computer simulators that are used by law enforcement? When I was in corrections, we had one of them at the range. They can be set up with all the equipment carried by your officers. The senario is video taped and the computer is used to control what action the subject takes. The last one that I attended involved an upset female who was advised repeatedly by myself and my partner to obtain permission from the warden for what she wanted. At the end of the senario, she pulled a gun from her waisband and was permanetly stopped from her action by myself and my partner when we drew our handguns and took care of the situation. It was very reolistic and even though I knew it was training, my hands were sweating after the shooting.
                Murphy was an optomist.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mall Director
                  Fortunately, I have a blank store to use, and different reality tools. The basis I was following for realisim minus awareness, was brought on by Military training procedures that are conducted. In controlled environments, with the availability to "kill switch" it at any time, before things get too heated, its a great tool, as the real deffects come out, where in a non blind scenerio, people will function differently, than if under concept of realism. The inert over actual, is safety barrier for individual loss of control, which is something that I personally would like to know the limits of the individual. I of course dont want things to escilate to that point, as the switch would be thrown. Just additional safety.

                  The one key thing I have taken from experience, is that the most realistic training complied and available to anyone, will provide measuring tools, and self actualization of skills. I had this done so many times to myself while serving, then to actually have to use the realistic training I recieved in actual combat made a difference. I am always looking for ways to challenge, push and test the staff I have, not only to ensure we are on top of things, but to help each of them individually realise they have what it takes, being confident, and taking home some pride that they are "Trained Professionals".

                  So, onto other ideas... I recently was able to get PD to give a course on Officer Safety Awareness concerning edged weapons, and it was fantastic, as I could see the reaction from a few of my people, that it had hit home. Officer Safety Awareness is very important, as we can never under estimate the subjects we come in contact with.

                  Anyone else hit a block of training they found useful or enlightening?
                  The key difference being that this isn't military training. When I was in the Air Force (granted years ago) as a cop we always knew it was a training scenario. Whether it was our version of SWAT training, our riot control training, or our combat training....we KNEW. Even then there were still accidents.

                  Also, even when we are talking about highly trained teams - like SEALS, SF, certain SWAT teams etc....even if they are in the CQB drills with live ammo, they KNOW it's a training scenario.

                  It's not the knowing aspect, IMHO, but what efforts the officers put into the scenarios that make the difference.
                  "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aka Bull
                    It's not the knowing aspect, IMHO, but what efforts the officers put into the scenarios that make the difference.
                    Right on Bull! The only thing I want to add is that it is also the quality of the role-players, in addition to the efforts of the guards, that make the scenario like real life.

                    That is why picking the right role-players is very critical. You want role-players who can think on their feet, because sometimes ad-libbing is sometimes necessary, but not someone who will get bored easily and change the scenario around, so that the scenario goes in a totally different direction than was intended.

                    Again, buy Training at the Speed of Life and read it. The book goes into much more detail than I could ever post here.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by histfan71
                      Right on Bull! The only thing I want to add is that it is also the quality of the role-players, in addition to the efforts of the guards, that make the scenario like real life.

                      That is why picking the right role-players is very critical. You want role-players who can think on their feet, because sometimes ad-libbing is sometimes necessary, but not someone who will get bored easily and change the scenario around, so that the scenario goes in a totally different direction than was intended.

                      Again, buy Training at the Speed of Life and read it. The book goes into much more detail than I could ever post here.
                      Histfan71 thanks for picking up that addition about the role players - I overlooked the imprtance of that in my post. As you state, they are just as important too.
                      "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aka Bull
                        The key difference being that this isn't military training. When I was in the Air Force (granted years ago) as a cop we always knew it was a training scenario. Whether it was our version of SWAT training, our riot control training, or our combat training....we KNEW. Even then there were still accidents.

                        Also, even when we are talking about highly trained teams - like SEALS, SF, certain SWAT teams etc....even if they are in the CQB drills with live ammo, they KNOW it's a training scenario.

                        It's not the knowing aspect, IMHO, but what efforts the officers put into the scenarios that make the difference.
                        aka Bull:
                        As hard as they and we tried, SAT Security Alert Teams and Reserve SAT had accidents. When you get involved in as realistic training as SAC demanded, even the umpires were often swept up in the problem.
                        We had an instance where a US Army MG wanted to test the security of SAC at Little Rock AFB, AR where the Division Commander was a classmate of his from USMA. Cocked B-47s are guarded closely and he wanted to see just how close he could get. He was stopped at the gate clearly marked Restricted Area and deadly force could be used. His driver and he wound up on the ground cuffed as SAT and the entry control Air Policeman treated this person, dressed as a two star just like any attempted intruder. The driver faired no better. The "Seven High" report when all the way to SAC HQ. This person dressed like a Army two star and driver were lifted by two SAT members and thrown, actually thrown, in the the back of a pickup and brought to the Command Post. Needless to say, the USMA classmate was duly impressed and dressed down by his fellow USMA in such a manner the whole building knew about it. After things calmed down, identities were established, the APs involved came to attention and the NCOIC said, "Sir, we recognize you as MG so-and-so. The shaken but contrite MG asked the NCOIC what would have happened if he tried to ram the gate. The reply from the NCOIC was simple and to the point, "General, you and your driver would be either dead or seriously wounded." The AF CG and all the APs were congratulated on such tight security the actions and reaction of all concerned. Both the driver and MG were driven to the base hospital for some treatment to cuts and bruises.
                        Ironic as it sounds, the same test was held the day before and the players were dressed as Army officers.
                        aka Bull, this could have turned out much differently!
                        Enjoy the day,
                        Bill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                          aka Bull:
                          As hard as they and we tried, SAT Security Alert Teams and Reserve SAT had accidents. When you get involved in as realistic training as SAC demanded, even the umpires were often swept up in the problem.
                          We had an instance where a US Army MG wanted to test the security of SAC at Little Rock AFB, AR where the Division Commander was a classmate of his from USMA. Cocked B-47s are guarded closely and he wanted to see just how close he could get. He was stopped at the gate clearly marked Restricted Area and deadly force could be used. His driver and he wound up on the ground cuffed as SAT and the entry control Air Policeman treated this person, dressed as a two star just like any attempted intruder. The driver faired no better. The "Seven High" report when all the way to SAC HQ. This person dressed like a Army two star and driver were lifted by two SAT members and thrown, actually thrown, in the the back of a pickup and brought to the Command Post. Needless to say, the USMA classmate was duly impressed and dressed down by his fellow USMA in such a manner the whole building knew about it. After things calmed down, identities were established, the APs involved came to attention and the NCOIC said, "Sir, we recognize you as MG so-and-so. The shaken but contrite MG asked the NCOIC what would have happened if he tried to ram the gate. The reply from the NCOIC was simple and to the point, "General, you and your driver would be either dead or seriously wounded." The AF CG and all the APs were congratulated on such tight security the actions and reaction of all concerned. Both the driver and MG were driven to the base hospital for some treatment to cuts and bruises.
                          Ironic as it sounds, the same test was held the day before and the players were dressed as Army officers.
                          aka Bull, this could have turned out much differently!
                          Enjoy the day,
                          Bill
                          Agreed Bill, it sure could have. At Dover AFB we had C-5's. Try an unathorized entry to where one of them was and see how quickly you stared down the barrel of a 16. Same in England with our nuke Cruise missiles. Want to end your life, try forcing your way into the alert/storage area.
                          "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There was one of many incidents at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa where a main-gate runner was engaged by 6th Security Forces. A stupid Airman running towards the base and "sancutary" with Tampa Police pursuing over a DUI.

                            One such airman tried to ram the gate. I would have to look it up, but either Tampa Police or 6th SF opened fire. The Hillsbrouugh County Coroner stopped counting bullet holes in the vehicle after several hundred.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Safety is the most important part of your training scenerios.

                              Yes the High Speed Low Drag Military units do get training casualties too.

                              Years ago in the USN during a training exercise a concussion grenade was supposed to be rolled into the room however the grenadier was told "a grenade" so he rolled in a fragmentaion as he normally would. The problem was the walls were plywood with bullet stops only up so far and a shell wood door. Schrapnel came thru the door just missing the guy. Stunned the h3ll out of us but we STILL had to make entry.

                              Make sure the officer knows it IS training. Put the stress on them by way of the role players. Tell them they are being graded (super with a clipboard) then have the actors try to crank them up.

                              Comment

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