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Stabbed with Syringe

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    It's sure better than running in the opposite direction!
    That's step #2.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    "When I was in Israel recently on a trip on security, one of the aspects that was emphasized was the need to work with private security forces," said Weiss, whose Public Safety Committee will conduct the hearings to determine what action the city can take.

    "In many cases - if there is a terrorist attack, a fire or an earthquake - these are the people who will be first responders."

    ---

    People use the term "first responder" very loosely, these days. For example, Wisconsin State Statute defines a "first responder" in statute. This is based on a National Standard for First Responders, which seems to be some kind of EMS term.

    Law Enforcement Officers, as professional rescuers, fit the term "first responder" if they have been given the "First Responder for Law Enforcement" certificate course. Otherwise, they usually have no duty to render aid beyond summoning EMS, as they are not trained in the administration of aid.

    This is the term I mean by "First Responder." Most security companies will flat tell anyone, "We are not contracting for professional rescuer services, and our guards are not authorized to provide professional rescue services. They may, of a personal initiative, perform basic first aid to the standard of a lay rescuer. However, we do not encourage this practice, as we are not professional rescuers."

    This is why OSHA does not consider security as an industry to have an occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. They're not supposed to become involved in medical situations, so therefore, they're not professionally exposed to them.

    Extract of 2005 WI State Statute
    146.50(1)(hm)
    (hm) "First responder" means an individual who is certified by the department as a first responder under sub. (8).

    146.50(2)
    (2) License or certificate required. No person may act as or advertise for the provision of services as an ambulance service provider unless the person holds an ambulance service provider license issued under this section. No individual may act as or advertise for the provision of services as an emergency medical technician unless he or she holds an emergency medical technician license or training permit issued under sub. (5). No individual may act as or advertise for the provision of services as a first responder unless he or she holds a first responder certificate issued under sub. (8).

    146.50(8)
    (8) Certification of first responders.
    146.50(8)(a)
    (a) Except as provided in ss. 146.51 and 146.52, the department shall certify qualified applicants as first responders.

    146.50(8)(b)
    (b) To be eligible for initial certification as a first responder, except as provided in ss. 146.51 and 146.52, an individual shall meet all of the following requirements:

    146.50(8)(b)1.
    1. The individual is 18 years of age or older and capable of performing the actions authorized under par. (e), or in rules promulgated under par. (e), for a first responder.

    146.50(8)(b)2.
    2. Subject to ss. 111.321, 111.322 and 111.335, the individual does not have an arrest or conviction record.

    146.50(8)(b)3.
    3. The individual satisfactorily completes a first responder course that meets or exceeds the guidelines issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration under 23 CFR 1205.3 (a) (5), that includes training for response to acts of terrorism, and that is approved by the department.

    146.50(8)(c)
    (c) To be eligible for a renewal of a certificate as a first responder, except as provided in ss. 146.51 and 146.52, the holder of the certificate shall satisfactorily complete a first responder refresher course that meets or exceeds the guidelines issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration under 23 CFR 1205.3 (a) (5), that includes training for response to acts of terrorism, and that is approved by the department.

    146.50(8)(d)
    (d) The department may not charge a fee for a certificate initially issued or renewed under this subsection.

    146.50(8)(e)
    (e) A certified first responder is authorized to use an automatic or semiautomatic defibrillator, as prescribed for first responders in rules promulgated by the department. The rules shall set forth authorization for the use of an automatic defibrillator, a semiautomatic defibrillator or, for a defibrillator that may be operated in more than one mode, use in the automatic or semiautomatic mode only. A certified first responder is also authorized to employ other techniques, including the administration of nonvisualized advanced airways, and the administration of medications that are specified by the department by rule. In promulgating the rules under this paragraph, the department shall consult with the state medical director for emergency medical services and the emergency medical services board. The rule shall include those techniques that are specified in the most current guidelines issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration under 23 CFR 1205.3 (a) (5).

    146.50(8)(f)
    (f) Except as provided in ss. 146.51 and 146.52, the department may issue a certificate as a first responder, without requiring satisfactory completion of any instruction or training that may be required under par. (b), to any individual who holds a current license or certificate as a first responder from another jurisdiction if the department finds that the standards for licensing or issuing certificates in the other jurisdiction are at least substantially equivalent to the standards for issuance of certificates for first responders in this state, and that the applicant is otherwise qualified.

    146.50(8)(g)
    (g) The department may not impose a requirement that an individual be affiliated with an ambulance service provider in order to receive a first responder certificate.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Interesting. AZ considers a security officer a "first responder" under USC and OSHA definitions? Usually, "professional first responder" is limited to EMT, EMT-P, Law Enforcement Officers, and Hospital personnel.

    This is one of the reasons that security companies don't have to provide PPE. OSHA dosen't think they're "first responders," and states limit who can call themselves that title.
    Apparently California is also thinking of calling us First Responders. See http://www2.dailynews.com/news/ci_3682133

    Leave a comment:


  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Just for clarification does chemist=pharmacy?

    yes chemist is a pharmacy here but we mainly just call it chemist.i spoke to a police officer today this lady was a security guard at the mall across from the mall i work in and she was saying that she worries about the female guard across the road as she does not think about what could happen when she leaves the mall.and she would go straight up to the 2 junkies and end up in some serious trouble.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Do you mean that dialing 911 doesn't count as a first response?
    It's sure better than running in the opposite direction!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    I think (hope) things are in fact changing. There is still a lot of Security, especially on the contract side, where security is to observe & report. My experience on the other hand, working in-house, is that we are expected to react as first responders.
    Do you mean that dialing 911 doesn't count as a first response?

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Interesting. AZ considers a security officer a "first responder" under USC and OSHA definitions? Usually, "professional first responder" is limited to EMT, EMT-P, Law Enforcement Officers, and Hospital personnel.
    I think (hope) things are in fact changing. There is still a lot of Security, especially on the contract side, where security is to observe & report. My experience on the other hand, working in-house, is that we are expected to react as first responders.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Interesting. AZ considers a security officer a "first responder" under USC and OSHA definitions? Usually, "professional first responder" is limited to EMT, EMT-P, Law Enforcement Officers, and Hospital personnel.

    This is one of the reasons that security companies don't have to provide PPE. OSHA dosen't think they're "first responders," and states limit who can call themselves that title.

    Leave a comment:


  • luckey
    replied
    OSHA is a federal standard but for AZ I got the following answer, atleast for AZ
    "The Arizona OSHA program follows the federal standards, which, in the case of bloodborne pathogens, means that first responders would be covered under the standard if they were at risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. Appropriate PPE would be required if the potential for exposure exists, along with training being provided in accordance with the standard."

    Fernando J. Mendieta,

    Training Officer

    Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health

    800 W. Washington St.

    Phoenix, AZ 85007

    602-542-1640

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by ozsecuritychic
    if i see them come in i call the police and let them deal with them.people might think thats gutless and say im not doing my job but i know these people have needles and i know they have just shot up and feel invinceable i have a family to get home to.
    There is nothing to be ashamed of there ozsecuritychic! Unlike a lot of our American friends we in our countries are rarely armed, not even with Tazers or pepper spray. As I've mentioned a few times in posts, I believe we are First Responders to emergencies. it is up to us to respond, find out what is going on, try to control it UNTIL the police, fire or ambulance arrive.

    Just for clarification does chemist=pharmacy?

    Leave a comment:


  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    there is 2 junkies that get out of a taxi behind the mall i work in go into the chemist then come into mall and shoot up in the toilets.the male guard that was there before me had banned them from the mall but because he didnt keep records or even write it in the occurance books i cant have them charged with tresspassing.the police have to know when they were served and how long they were banned.if i see them come in i call the police and let them deal with them.people might think thats gutless and say im not doing my job but i know these people have needles and i know they have just shot up and feel invinceable i have a family to get home to.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    OSHA is a federal agency. Some states, if they have an OSHA program that meets criteria, can regulate as OSHA's agent. There are universal federal OSHA regulations, and then states can add additional regulation onto the federal. California, for example, has many added regulations for worker safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Am I right in believing that OSHA is a federal government agency? I'm interested in the differences between the US & Canada. Canada has one criminal code for the whole country. I believe each state has their own. In Canada workers health & safety is a provincial government responsibilty in the US it's the federal government! (The CSST in Quebec - the Commission de Sante et Securite aux Travail).

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    OSHA requires employers to, supply PPE at not cost the the employees and in various sizes

    Keep in mind that OSHA does not believe that the job code for "security guard and survelience agent" has an occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens, and that your companies generally do not have to provide PPE for anything except inclement weather.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Good info. In the hotel industry it is not only Security that has to deal with these issues. In the past 5 years, 3 Maids have been stabbed by disguarded needles. And from the most unlikely looking guests. 2 were businessmen. You'd think they would at least cap their needles after using them

    Leave a comment:

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