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Armored Car Security Robbed at WalMart

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  • Armored Car Security Robbed at WalMart

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....14ea33e0.html

    According to this story a Loomis and Fargo guard was robbed while entering a Wal-Mart in Garland, TX with a bank bag. He was pepper sprayed by the suspect and the bag was forcibly taken.
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

  • #2
    It used to be that armored cars had 3 guards (including the driver). The driver stayed with the vehicle and two guards handled the money transaction. Now it's a driver and one guard. Anyone else notice this trend?
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

    Comment


    • #3
      And neither one of them iced that fool?
      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
      "The Curve" 1998

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      • #4
        I noticed that in my area that there are only 2 guys in any given car. Even the service techs work alone. I had a buddy who worked L&F in Las Vegas and they usually ran 3 to a car, actually he might frequent this sight, he could probably give you a better reasoning why they ran 3 or not. (IE amount of money or high profile)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
          And neither one of them iced that fool?
          Driver's not getting out of the car, and if the suspect is running, can't cap him in the back. I think the jumper is on his own once he gets out of the truck.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
            Driver's not getting out of the car, and if the suspect is running, can't cap him in the back. I think the jumper is on his own once he gets out of the truck.
            All the jumpers I have seen in north Texas are on their own. Most of them carry revolvers and don't wear body armor. My impression of most of them is they are not physically or mentally prepared to use force in such a situation. It sounds like the bad guy closed the reactionary gap before the security could respond, taking advantage of psychological complacency.
            "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 1stWatch
              ..... Most of them carry revolvers and don't wear body armor. My impression of most of them is they are not physically or mentally prepared to use force in such a situation....
              I think you're right. Given their equipment, I can understand why many of them are not going to resist. This robbery was an exception to where automatic weapons, body armor, multiple gunmen, and meticulous planning are the norm.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mr. Security
                I think you're right. Given their equipment, I can understand why many of them are not going to resist. This robbery was an exception to where automatic weapons, body armor, multiple gunmen, and meticulous planning are the norm.
                Oh, I believe they had adequate equipment to respond with force, but what the bad guy had here was the "element of suprise". According to what I saw, they used pepper spray on the security guard (a trend that is increasing btw) before he could react and then seized the bag while a weapon was displayed in hand.

                This type of attack is what could be referred to as a "preemptive strike", except instead of a boxer's jab being used before a heavier blow, pepper spray was used to immobilize the senses before threatening with the heavier blow, which was the bad guy's pistol.

                This could only have been avoided if they would have seen him coming. They were unaware of their surroundings. They just wanted to get the drop done and hurry to the next site. Their sense of awareness was that of the average person, one of "tunnel vision". Had they seen him coming, in other words be aware of where every person's hands and feet were who were around them, they would have had a reactionary gap in which they could have responded; however, the robbery suspect closed the reactionary gap before they knew he was there. One shot would certainly have been decisive.

                This is how most robberies I have been privvy to happened. People mind their own business and then "bam", the predator who decided to make them a victim is suddenly upon them.

                This is how that incident happened in Grapevine, TX where an unarmed mall security guard robbed an armored car. That case is now closed, but some people were dumbfounded how an unarmed person could rob an armored vehicle with armed personnel aboard.
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've only seen 2 man teams in my area as well. One driver, one runner. And yes, the ATM techs tend to work alone as well. Difference there, though, is with the agency I used to work for. We were contracted to the major ATM tech company (starts with a D, for those in the know.. lol)... When they had to go out to repair one, we got a 30-min advance call. Closest Officer had to drop everything he was doing and respond to that site, and stand guard for whatever length of time it took for the repairs to be done. Sometimes it was 15 mins, sometimes it was 3-4 hours. Made it somewhat difficult to get all the patrols & other stuff done, not to mention being non-call-responsive for that long...

                  When dispatch would call these out, you could almost hear the unanimous sigh of "Aw man!" from all of us Officers in the field... lol
                  Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                  Originally posted by ValleyOne
                  BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                  Shoulda called in sick.
                  Be safe!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 1stWatch
                    Oh, I believe they had adequate equipment to respond with force.....
                    In this case, of course. In most other robberies involving firearms, a revolver simply isn't going to cut it. (Unless, of course, you happen to be "Marshal Matt Dillon" )
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here's an article with more detailed information about the incident. Apparently, the bad guy has a track record with this kind of thing.

                      http://www.woai.com/news/local/story...7-C534751C206F
                      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I hope that people are actually reading the threat bulletins, and realizing that they may be next.

                        Armored Car Guards are NOT a customer service gig. Someone gets in your way, remove them. Any hostile action should make you "fear for your life." Don't give some prick time to spray you, don't let him even get close.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                          ......Don't give some prick time to spray you, don't let him even get close.
                          I've seen this tactic used on LE during a traffic stop. When the officer comes up to the driver's window, s/he sprays the cop in the face and takes off. The officer can't pursue because their eyes are forced closed. Bad guy gets away temporarily.
                          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If that happens to an officer, they have had a lapse in memory of the initial training they received.
                            Vehicle stopped, tag number, description and number of observed passengers radioed back to the dispatcher. Officer then dismounts and approaches.
                            The vehicle is stopped, the officer states the driver places both hands on the steering wheel and passengers keep their hands empty and in plain sight.
                            If the loudspeaker announces a code for the officer, the officer excuses himself or herself and gets back on the radio. If the car is reported stolen or other possible hazard to the officer, backup is automatically dispatched. Remember the "Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement" or "The Ten Deadly Sins."
                            One never, ever gets out of the vehicle without first notifying their dispatch. To do otherwise is done at one's peril.
                            Enjoy the day,
                            Bill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                              If that happens to an officer, they have had a lapse in memory of the initial training they received.
                              Vehicle stopped, tag number, description and number of observed passengers radioed back to the dispatcher. Officer then dismounts and approaches.
                              The vehicle is stopped, the officer states the driver places both hands on the steering wheel and passengers keep their hands empty and in plain sight.
                              If the loudspeaker announces a code for the officer, the officer excuses himself or herself and gets back on the radio. If the car is reported stolen or other possible hazard to the officer, backup is automatically dispatched. Remember the "Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement" or "The Ten Deadly Sins."
                              One never, ever gets out of the vehicle without first notifying their dispatch. To do otherwise is done at one's peril.
                              Enjoy the day,
                              Bill
                              Let's just say that this officer got a quick "refresher course." By the way, they caught up with her.
                              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                              Comment

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