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Wackenhut guard injured in bank robbery

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  • Wackenhut guard injured in bank robbery

    Wackenhut Guard at Bank Shot During California Robbery

    see story: http://securityinfowatch.com/online/...ery/6787SIW457

  • #2
    Read stories like this from time to time. Happens all the time I'm sure we just don't hear about it. But I wonder. What happend to the guard? Was he commended? Fired? Transfferrd?

    Events like this happen here. From what I have heard. Most of the time guards working public access posts that clear leather for ANY reason ether get transferd or "nicely let go" down here in Florida. And it's usally not becuase of the company they work for. It's by the client's request.
    My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

    -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

    -It's just a job kid deal with it

    -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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    • #3
      Good question. The guard gave his weapon up, then resisted? Or resisted ANd gave his weapon up? The article isn't clear on that.

      I still have the mentality that there are times to give your weapon up, but these are the "I have no other option" time. This is where officer safety courses and defensive tactics training come into play.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        N.A., I am reaching back 40 years, we were always instructed to never, ever, surrender your weapon for any reason to include preventing another officer from being shot. The only way the bad guy gets your weapon if off your dead body.
        Having read the text, I am not sure of what exactly what happened or in the sequence of events.
        Any additional information on this subject would be appreciated.
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
          N.A., I am reaching back 40 years, we were always instructed to never, ever, surrender your weapon for any reason to include preventing another officer from being shot. The only way the bad guy gets your weapon if off your dead body.
          Having read the text, I am not sure of what exactly what happened or in the sequence of events.
          Any additional information on this subject would be appreciated.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill
          I remember that too, but now days, they're getting so liability concious, I'm not sure what the official line the states are touting in their firearms training. It never came up, honestly, in the Florida G course. Just "When to shoot, How to shoot, What to say after."
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
            I remember that too, but now days, they're getting so liability concious, I'm not sure what the official line the states are touting in their firearms training. It never came up, honestly, in the Florida G course. Just "When to shoot, How to shoot, What to say after."
            Indeed old school LEO days. Never, never give up your gun. If you do the bad guy now has ether two hostages or two victims. I can imagine what it's like for those that work for companies that have policies about giving up your gun in the name of liability. It's just amazing how the issue of being armed turns into a game of political pass or save a buck. Yea, the "G" course was not exactly firm on that issue as to rather more of "what not to do".
            My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

            -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

            -It's just a job kid deal with it

            -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

            Comment


            • #7
              It is a complex issue. Give up your weapon, others are wounded or murdered, the liability issue will take center stage. The lawyers will fight over the scraps of whatever, the security officer will be fired because he or she exhibited poor judgment.
              Don't give up your weapon, others are wounded or murdered, the liability issue again takes center stage. The lawyers will again fight over the scraps of whatever, again, the security is fired because he or she exhibited poor judgement.
              The fired security officer will be black balled from the industry and it is doubtful that person would be employed anywhere on this planet.
              The company or legal jurisdiction will always win; hindsight always being 20/20.
              It may appear a dour assessment, but a realistic one I think. The "reasonable prudent man theory" has taken a severe hit.
              Enjoy the day,
              Bill

              Comment


              • #8
                Hall, 65, of San Bernardino, was putting some paperwork in his rented Ford F-150 pickup about 10:30 a.m. when an armed man approached him from behind and demanded his gun.
                Hall, who works for the security company Wackenhut, resisted....

                Not a good idea. He's fortunate that he lived to talk about it. I doubt that he followed Wackenhut procedures.
                Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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