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  • Broken Nose

    I have never seen a post about ones self but here it goes.

    I just got my nose broken

    This is the first time I have ever been punched in the face, at work. I have to admit I DID NOT have my guard up at all. This is mostly my fault

    Never forget NEVER let your guard down. No matter how many times you are threatened.!!!!

    I was threatened to be punched in the face, and well it happened. I wish I could give every detail but I can't (HIPPA).

    This is the 4th time I have been injured in 3 mo.
    NOV. Kicked in the ribs restraining a drunk, bursed ribs.

    DEC. Kicked in stomach re-restraining a drunk, knocked a gas bubble loose

    Jan. Kicked in the radio by psyc pt:
    Punched in the face, broken nose.

    BE ALERT, BE AWAKE,

    most of all

    BE SAFE

    KW
    Last edited by Knight Watch; 01-14-2007, 06:45 AM.

  • #2
    When I was an LEO I suffered a broken nose while apprehending an armed robbery suspect in a house. I ran in after him, had him handcuffed and was bringing him out of the house when, out of nowhere, four of his family members appeared and tried to take him back. My back, and his, were against a wall, his Mother and Sister were trying to get my gun and one of his brothers landed a punch that broke my nose. As I was passing out, I observed the uniform officers coming through the front door so I knew everything would be OK.

    I sued my assailant after he was convicted in criminal court. The civil suit was the first in Ohio where a LEO sued his assailant for damages. I won and never collected a dime. He spent most of his life in prison for robbery, burglary and rape convictions.

    My goal was to set precedence for the future.

    Moral to the story? Sometimes backup is - way back!
    Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
    Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

    Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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    • #3
      That is the reason all the people either LEO or SO must assiduously remember the Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement also known as the Ten Deadly Sins.
      Enjoy the day,
      Bill

      Comment


      • #4
        I wish I could give every detail but I can't (HIPPA).
        HIPPA says you can't give out details of YOUR OWN medical situations?

        What type of ****ed up commie bull**** is that??
        Last edited by OccamsRazor; 01-14-2007, 04:24 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Security Consultant
          When I was an LEO I suffered a broken nose while apprehending an armed robbery suspect in a house. I ran in after him, had him handcuffed and was bringing him out of the house when, out of nowhere, four of his family members appeared and tried to take him back. My back, and his, were against a wall, his Mother and Sister were trying to get my gun and one of his brothers landed a punch that broke my nose. As I was passing out, I observed the uniform officers coming through the front door so I knew everything would be OK.

          I sued my assailant after he was convicted in criminal court. The civil suit was the first in Ohio where a LEO sued his assailant for damages. I won and never collected a dime. He spent most of his life in prison for robbery, burglary and rape convictions.

          My goal was to set precedence for the future.

          Moral to the story? Sometimes backup is - way back!
          CT LE sues their assailants all the time and does pretty well $$$$$$. I know someone who works at a law firm that represents the police. I think they (the police) deserve every penny. Financial pain and criminal penalties help to get the message through to other individuals who entertain the thought of resisting arrest with violence.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            This incident took place 31 years ago - back when I was a young detective and thought I was invincible. Lesson learned. An attorney took the case at no charge as it was the first.
            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
            Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

            Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wilrobnson
              HIPPA says you can't give out details of YOUR OWN medical situations?

              What type of ****ed up commie bull**** is that??
              A patient probably hit him.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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              • #8
                I was recently involved in a Patient Assault. According to HIPAA, I can talk about it as long as I dont give away anything about the patient's identity.
                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                "The Curve" 1998

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by wilrobnson
                  HIPPA says you can't give out details of YOUR OWN medical situations?

                  What type of ****ed up commie bull**** is that??

                  I was meaning what had transpired leading up to my nose being broken. You know the who, what, where, when and how.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
                    I was recently involved in a Patient Assault. According to HIPAA, I can talk about it as long as I dont give away anything about the patient's identity.
                    Our hospital is VERY touchy on the HIPPA deal. I just dont want to have to splane my self.

                    Last edited by Knight Watch; 01-15-2007, 12:55 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      A patient probably hit him.

                      ------------------- -----------------------

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just curious, off hand Do you know what "HIPPA" stands for?
                        "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                        "The Curve" 1998

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BHR Lawson
                          Just curious, off hand Do you know what "HIPPA" stands for?
                          HIPPA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. To find out more information, and I encourage you to do so, your attention is invited to the HHS website http://www.cms.hhs.gov/hippa/hippa2/...ty/default.asp
                          Enjoy the day,
                          Bill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BHR Lawson
                            Just curious, off hand Do you know what "HIPPA" stands for?
                            Aah...the number of HIPPA/HIPAA training seminars I've had to attend for healthcare information systems finally pays off! Incidentally, you'll find both abbreviations (HIPAA and HIPPA) being widely used in the vernacular, depending on whether the user is referring to the "Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act", or the "Healthcare Portability and Privacy Act". No big - they're the same thing.

                            Allow me to bloviate (with apologies to Bill O'Reilly).

                            Call it HIPAA or HIPPA, this federal law addresses a number of issues regarding insurance portability (from one job to another), but also includes provisions regarding the privacy and security of medical information, both in terms of disclosure, storage and electronic transmission. There are both civil and criminal sanctions for the disclosure of "individually identifiable" medical information (i.e., information that can be identified as pertaining to a particular individual). Healthcare providers, insurers, employers and all of their related "business partners" (vendors, etc.) who may be in possession of medical information about patients, employees, etc. all fall under the provisions of this act.

                            Knight Watch could certainly, under the law, provide the general outline of what happened, including a detailed description of the event itself, but would have to do so in such a way that no reader could discern the identity of the patient involved, either directly or indirectly (for instance, by saying "This patient owns the Ace Hardware store in town" or that sort of thing). The reason for the legal precautions here is not that Knight Watch would necessarily be giving out medical information about the patient, but even the fact that an identified individual was in the hospital IS medical information about that person under this law. This is why you'll often see news stories where a hospital spokesman will not even confirm that someone is a patient in that hospital. Hospitals that interpret the rules a little less rigidly might confirm that the person is a patient but refuse to give their condition. And, yet others believe that the law permits them to give both pieces of information, but no more. As with most federal laws, you can see that there are a million interpretations and the law will gradually be sorted out in the case law that arises from lawsuits, unfortunately...but that's our legal system. Since HIPPA only took full effect within the last few years, it will take awhile before the case law catches up with it as cases come to court and wend their way through the appeals processes to the high courts who really count when it comes to interpreting the law of the land.
                            Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-15-2007, 07:39 PM.
                            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                            • #15
                              I know what HIPAA is and what it does, point is, it's HIPAA not HIPPA.

                              Just one of my pet peeves.
                              "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                              "The Curve" 1998

                              Comment

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