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Security Guard shot twice in the chest

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  • msovfin
    replied
    Night Watchmen Act

    Finally came across this...

    NIGHT WATCHMEN, HIRED TO PROTECT REAL ESTATE Act of Jun. 26, 1895, P.L. 333, No. 248

    To authorize occupants of real estate in cities and boroughs of
    the Commonwealth to employ night watchmen, with the approval
    of the court of quarter sessions of the proper county or of
    the Director of the Department of Public Safety in any city
    having such a department, and conferring upon the night
    watchmen thus employed, all rights, privileges and powers of
    constables and policemen duly elected or appointed in such
    cities or boroughs.
    Section 1. Employment by individuals; appointment; powers
    It shall be lawful for any number of persons owning or
    occupying real estate in any city, borough or township of this
    Commonwealth, upon application to and with the approval of the
    court of quarter sessions of the proper county, to employ a
    night watchman or night watchmen for the purpose of protecting
    their premises and property in the night-time and all persons so
    appointed, with the approval aforesaid, as night watchman shall
    have, exercise and enjoy all the rights, powers and privileges,
    now vested by law in constables or police officers duly elected
    or appointed in said cities or boroughs: Provided, however, That
    such night watchmen shall not exercise the power of serving
    subpoenas or any civil or other process: Provided, That in any
    city having a department of public safety, all such applications
    shall be made to and granted by the director of said department
    under such rules and regulations as may be adopted by said
    department. 1895, June 26, P.L. 333, Sec. 1.

    http://www.legis.state.pa.us/WU01/LI...95/0/0248..PDF

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  • zjimbur
    replied
    Allied Barton is armed in Texas

    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    Are you talking about the Master Security Officer certification training? I worked for Allied only briefly in mid-2004, but I believe I remember a MSO program.

    Again, I'm surprised to hear about Allied running armed accounts. The company preached about being strictly unarmed-only when I worked there. Yes, it is surprising to see how a company can change.
    Allied Barton in Texas is armed for some contracts. I work as an SO for a transit company and we are all armed, about 50 officers.

    Leave a comment:


  • msofin
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    DERAIL!
    What's Empowerment Act 201C?
    I will answer this question to the best of my ability, as far as I now there isn't any useful information on the web. In Pennsylvania The Night Watchman's act, Empowerment Act 201C, is an act that grants police powers to private agents and is 'awarded' (officers sworn in) by the local district majestrate.
    My understanding this is usually done by:
    1. Switching official name of the department to Public Safety
    for example, AlliedBarton Security Services will become Penn Estates Public Safety. Although the employees are still Allied officers, they will were uniforms with a site specific patch and badge.
    2. All officers must be Pa Act 235 certified (lethal weapons training for private agents.
    3. Continuing education must be done for use of force, sensitivity training, etc...
    4. A request must be submitted to the dm and have the support of the local police.
    5. dm will decide if he will honor the request, if he does your officers will be sworn in and will have arrest powers 7 days a week from 1900hrs to 0700hrs.
    6. If you can justify the need different hrs of empowerment can be granted from additional hours for one week to 24/7 empowerment.

    It's basically like being a police department except you do not investigate any serious complaints of press charges (through the DA's office). That will still be done by the local PD.

    Hope that helps, anyone else able to elaborate on this or clear anything up?

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Back on topic regarding teh shooting in the trailer park....
    From the newpaper article-
    "He points it to my face. I grabbed it and the first shot hit my chest, second, hit the awards I was wearing," he said.

    The first shot hit Nicholson's bulletproof vest, the second ricocheted off his badge and hit his shoulder.
    The SO says Awards and the reporter says Badge. Why would anyone refer to a badge as awards? I understand the media often gets things mixed up but this is a pretty screwy sounding article. More questions than answers for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by msofin View Post
    That's exactly what I was talking about. As far as armed sites go, I think it comes down to the fact they are 'inheriting' armed sites from the companies they buy out and some of these sites bring in so much revenue it would be 'stupid' for them to let them go. The armed site I worked at was one of many PSB had in the area all but two were not rebid on, as the amount of revenue they brought in versus the risk high risk was not seen as desirable by management. The other armed site that we no longer have (both armed sites I speak of are gated communities) was scene as to big a risk for the DM. They ended up going in house and now have Empowerment Act 201C, also known as the Night Watchman's Act. Past supervisors have attempted to pursue 201C at the site remaining but it has been rumored the DM won't go for it, even if KOP has no problems with it. But who knows if that's true or not, at least it's something to talk about
    DERAIL!
    What's Empowerment Act 201C?

    Leave a comment:


  • msofin
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    Are you talking about the Master Security Officer certification training? I worked for Allied only briefly in mid-2004, but I believe I remember a MSO program.

    Again, I'm surprised to hear about Allied running armed accounts. The company preached about being strictly unarmed-only when I worked there. Yes, it is surprising to see how a company can change.
    That's exactly what I was talking about. As far as armed sites go, I think it comes down to the fact they are 'inheriting' armed sites from the companies they buy out and some of these sites bring in so much revenue it would be 'stupid' for them to let them go. The armed site I worked at was one of many PSB had in the area all but two were not rebid on, as the amount of revenue they brought in versus the risk high risk was not seen as desirable by management. The other armed site that we no longer have (both armed sites I speak of are gated communities) was scene as to big a risk for the DM. They ended up going in house and now have Empowerment Act 201C, also known as the Night Watchman's Act. Past supervisors have attempted to pursue 201C at the site remaining but it has been rumored the DM won't go for it, even if KOP has no problems with it. But who knows if that's true or not, at least it's something to talk about

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by msofin View Post
    LPGuy, did the MSO independent learning series exist when you were with Allied? Just curious, thats all.
    Are you talking about the Master Security Officer certification training? I worked for Allied only briefly in mid-2004, but I believe I remember a MSO program.

    Again, I'm surprised to hear about Allied running armed accounts. The company preached about being strictly unarmed-only when I worked there. Yes, it is surprising to see how a company can change.

    Leave a comment:


  • msofin
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    If that's so, then I may have been wrong. Having worked as an unarmed uniformed security officer with Allied Security (right before they became Allied-Barton Security), I can tell you, however, that they are a strictly unarmed security company. The company would not let me carry even so much as my own personal canister of OC spray while on the job.

    I'd be very surprised to hear that they were issuing vests to their officers, or even accepting contracts where they felt vests would be needed. That doesn't sound like the company I worked for. And I certainly didn't receive "police training," as the news report described, only "Security Officer Basic Training" and your typical OJT.

    Then again, maybe their regional divisions operate differently, perhaps...
    LPGuy, did the MSO independent learning series exist when you were with Allied? Just curious, thats all.

    I was brought on with Allied Security in May 2005 several months after they bought out Barton Protective Services. However, In 2003 Allied bought out Professional Security Bureau (PSB), a company based in New Jersey. My district absorbed many of the PSB accounts including many armed sites, they've only maintained one armed site to date. We didn't get vests issued to us, they did however get very low prices from Galls for us.

    Since the acquisitions of Barton and Initial Security there has been an increase in armed jobs with the company. Up until know though, Allied Security was basically an unarmed company. My area manager, during a discussion, informed me when Allied was first formed the company was initially doing mostly armed work for athletic events and venues. I am not certain on this but I'm thinking the switch to unarmed services was made when Spectaguard acquired the original Allied Security company. I do find it very interesting how much one company (at least in name) can change over the years.

    I do believe AlliedBarton Security Services is the best contract security company to date, but I do believe they could be doing much better

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier

    I know that you can contract out your parking enforcement to a private company in WI.
    The people working for the "Public Security" agency in my borough are employees of a contract security agency even though they wear borough uniforms. They issue parking tickets, noised violation tickets, tickets for not respecting the garbage regulations & other by-laws. There is even an article in the code of penal procedure of Quebec that allows them to arrest you if you interfer in their duties by, for example, refusing to identy yourself so they know who to issue the ticket to.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Wow. Ok, general question:

    Does anyone else have the power to issue citations under the authority of a government entity, who is a private citizen and not a government employee?

    I know that you can contract out your parking enforcement to a private company in WI.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    How do you enforce them? Issue citations?
    Yep! (Here's the extra characters so the post will be accepted )

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    How do you enforce them? Issue citations? Keep in mind, in your provience, you also have by-laws enforcement officers and other such strange quazi-police creatures.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier

    Keep in mind, no security officer has a legal duty spelled out in statute to enforce any law. They may have a legal duty, contractually, to protect someone, but never to enforce a law.
    In Quebec a company may apply to the government to have their security staff given the powers to enforce the anti-smoking laws. I believe that once you got this power you would be required to enforce the law.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Wow. I really couldn't see a warm body company getting into that, when there's an actual legal duty to enforce law.

    Keep in mind, no security officer has a legal duty spelled out in statute to enforce any law. They may have a legal duty, contractually, to protect someone, but never to enforce a law.

    A Sworn Law Enforcement Officer has that legal duty, as they're sworn to enforce laws as well as protect people.

    Like many service professions, private policing is... a lottery. Your company hopes they don't get sued for what you do, or don't do.

    Leave a comment:


  • security steve
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Do you have a legal duty to enforce laws and protect people as a special police appointee of the Mayor's Office? Its very interesting that Allied is applying warm-body concepts to sworn law enforcement positions.
    Yes on that job site only to which our license is valid. Many of the SPO's I work with are LE. Allied Barton wants us to enforce the "major" laws while leaving infractions etc to local LE.

    It is all up to the officer how far they are going to take their SPO powers. Some go gung ho and others are lazy. The LE community is pretty resentful and talk about us as wanna bes or has beens. I am neither, I just like getting a solid check without the risk that they take daily.

    Leave a comment:

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