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  • Federal Police Employments

    FBI Police:
    http://www.fbijobs.gov/126.asp

    CIA Police:
    https://www.cia.gov/careers/jobs/tex...ctive_off.html

    Federal Reserve Police
    http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/jobs/WA/Sea...BFtzUAxQGxQ6IX

    All have similar duties....Great benefits + pensions.
    Last edited by FLEO; 12-26-2006, 02:22 AM.

  • #2
    Don't forget...

    US Marshals Service
    http://www.usmarshals.gov/careers/index.html

    Transportation Security Administration (Federal Air Marshals)
    http://www.tsa.gov/lawenforcement/programs/fams.shtm

    Veterans Health Administration
    http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/get...=0&SUBMIT1.y=0

    US Capitol Police
    http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/get...&ss=0&FedPub=Y

    And many, many more...
    "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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    • #3
      WTH is up with the "Voluntary PT Test" for the FBI Police?
      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
      "The Curve" 1998

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by davis002
        Don't forget...

        US Marshals Service
        http://www.usmarshals.gov/careers/index.html

        Transportation Security Administration (Federal Air Marshals)
        http://www.tsa.gov/lawenforcement/programs/fams.shtm

        Veterans Health Administration
        http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/get...=0&SUBMIT1.y=0

        US Capitol Police
        http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/get...&ss=0&FedPub=Y

        And many, many more...
        I think it's much simpler here in Canada. All federal policing is done by the RCMP!
        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

        Comment


        • #5
          Amazing isn't it, that these are all traditional security roles that the average street cop would not associate with the term "police."

          I wonder how many of these agencies are given federal law enforcement retirement benefits, and how many are considered "non-law enforcement officers" like DHS/CBP and other "non-police" police are.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
            Amazing isn't it, that these are all traditional security roles that the average street cop would not associate with the term "police."

            I wonder how many of these agencies are given federal law enforcement retirement benefits, and how many are considered "non-law enforcement officers" like DHS/CBP and other "non-police" police are.
            Nathan, from the information I've gathered, if personnel from these agencies go to either FLTEC in Georgia or its Western counterpart in New Mexico, upon graduation they are sworn police officers from their particular agency. The cadets who were selected for the USMS have to undergo 6-8 weeks more training before they are sworn as Deputy US Marshals. Some DUSMs go to Camp Beauregard, Pineville, LA for additional training. Some DUSMs go to specialized training at Ft Benning, GA.
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill

            Comment


            • #7
              The cadets who were selected for the USMS have to undergo 6-8 weeks more training before they are sworn as Deputy US Marshals.


              They are lucky, ours were 13 weeks long. It's pretty much the same s**t if you ever been to a police academy. It's funny in MN how the state requires you to go through an 9 months Police academy (they call it SKILLS) after college and then take the POST test. Then if you are fortunate enough get hired on a PD, they require you to go through THEIR academy. Which is the same s**t you were taught in SKILLS. So it's pretty much doing it all over again.
              Last edited by FLEO; 12-26-2006, 07:52 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                Nathan, from the information I've gathered, if personnel from these agencies go to either FLTEC in Georgia or its Western counterpart in New Mexico, upon graduation they are sworn police officers from their particular agency. The cadets who were selected for the USMS have to undergo 6-8 weeks more training before they are sworn as Deputy US Marshals. Some DUSMs go to Camp Beauregard, Pineville, LA for additional training. Some DUSMs go to specialized training at Ft Benning, GA.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill
                I do believe you are correct. I was referring to the OMB definition, which is why some agencies don't get vested in the "Federal Law Enforcement Retirement Plan" or whatever its called. Such as CBP and ICE "Inspectors," who have law enforcement powers vested in them by customs statutes. I.e. The government doesn't want to pay their pension as a national public safety officer on top of all the other national public safety officers.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not sure who "the government" is that "doesn't want to pay...pensions". To think of "the government" as some monolithic entity that "wants" or "doesn't want" anything is erroneous. "The government" is an enormous collection of entities and sub-entities within entities, each one having its own agenda, and often fighting among themselves to achieve them. There is no such thing as "the government", but only a "governmental patchwork".

                  This LE-pension thing is an enormously complex issue that has been batted around for years and years. It's complicated primarily by the fact that it has been the individual agencies (FBI, IRS, etc., etc.) - and not any central executive agency - that have been responsible for defining for themselves which positions in their agencies should be classified as "law enforcement officers". Things got worse when the courts threw out the 7-factor test developed by the Merit System Protection Board and that each agency used in making the "LE determination". Note that these factors were never about where or how anyone was trained, what they were called, etc., but about their job functions: (1) has frequent direct contact with criminal suspects; (2) is authorized to carry a firearm; (3) interrogates witnesses and suspects, giving Miranda warnings when appropriate; (4) works for long periods without a break; (5) is on call 24-hours a day; (6) is required to maintain a level of physical fitness; and (7) is exposed to hazard. Now, it seems that the definition is "an employee, the duties of whose position are primarily the nvestigation, apprehension, or detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States, including an employee engaged in this activity who is transferred to a supervisory or administrative position" according to the OPM. (5 CFR 831.902).

                  Obviously, there are quite a few positions that have been created or modified over the years and that would seem to meet the OPM definition, but what is missing here is the authority for OPM to require individual agencies to accept and apply this definition.

                  Adding fuel to this fire is that there are unions involved that, while they claim to want the problem of "LE determination" solved, cannot agree about whether this decision should be vested in the OPM or just where it should reside. The quibble, it seems, is that the head of OPM is a political appointment and so...

                  The OPM was ordered by Congress in 2003 to study this issue, and in 2004 produced a report which is worth reading as it examines the whole history of the long-standing problem, enumerates the inequities, and concludes that a central authority is needed to create and apply a uniform standard for what constitutes a federal LE officer across all agencies. The report closes by proposing that this central authority should reside with (guess who?) the OPM. Here is the OPM report to Congress on Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits

                  Well, this report really started the ball rolling like greased lightning, which in Congressional terms means that a couple of years later nothing more had been done on the recommendations in the OPM report other than the production of a "Concept Paper", proposing a possible bill to tackle the problem. So let's see....that's 2003, 2004, 2005 so far, and I don't see that anything happened in 2006. Unless I missed something, the issue is still hanging.

                  Here's an article from 2005 when the the "concept paper" came out, and the union reaction to it: LE Proposal Vexes Unions

                  Clearly, we can see that there is interest in this problem, and that among all of the various elements that comprise "the governmental patchwork" I mentioned above there are those that obviously DO want to correct this inequity. The real problem has not been whether, but rather how, to accomplish this and what executive agency should take the lead, etc.

                  Years ago, LE versus non-LE missions were much more clearly distinguishable so that the definition of an "LE officer" was an easy thing to do. However, the distinction has become murkier over the years, not only as agency missions, but as agencies themselves have been created, merged, eliminated, shifted around, etc., etc. - and with the creation of DHS this only became worse. The good news by my reading on the subject is that there IS a very significant interest in addressing the issue, if we can just get past the "how"...and the unions. So, we'll see now whether the Democrats in control of Congress have the gumption to move the ball down the field.
                  Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-27-2006, 06:50 AM.
                  "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                  "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                  "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                  "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                  • #10
                    Post to bury SPAM.
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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