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Whatcom Security (Washington)?

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  • TheRegulator
    replied
    Cpi

    The phrase stuck with me, what can I say? TRM

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  • cmndr
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRegulator View Post
    That's dead on... I wouldn't, and don't ask my Officers to do anything that's not directly related to the care, welfare, safety and security of the facility and persons they are responsible for.
    Sounds like you are a CPI Instructor too.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    That's a good point. If you're there to guard a door, you do not need to leave the door to go mop a floor in the next hallway. The client must understand, "no one is guarding that door while my employee is mopping your floor." And, if they go, "That's ok," ask yourself "why do they want that door guarded in the first place, if its ok to stop at random times?"

    Base your continued contractual relationship on the sanity of the reply you get. Do not let your client take your entire operation down.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRegulator
    That's dead on... I wouldn't, and don't ask my Officers to do anything that's not directly related to the care, welfare, safety and security of the facility and persons they are responsible for. Like SecTrainer said, there's a time and place, but as a general rule, a S/O's primary function is just that... Security Officer. TRM
    The "time and place" that I suggested is a situation in which there is a protective/safety issue involved, and I probably should have said that I meant ONLY such situations.

    I also should have said that the security officer must be alert to the possibility that someone might deliberately create a "hazard" situation in order to distract or divert the officer from his security duties. Officers assigned to access control posts, for instance, should probably never leave those posts unattended, or be expected to do anything that would permit someone to slip past them or otherwise defeat the access control system.

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  • TheRegulator
    replied
    In house vs. contract companies

    I've worked in house for two companies, Nintendo of America and Harris Ford (Bill Pierre owned). In both cases, I performed more non-security related duties than I did my purported basic job function. Yes there are security departments "in house" where the focus is more security centric, but you must choose those jobs carefully... Security as a whole is perceived as an expense and a drag on overhead by most organizations, which is why clients try to throw other duties on the Officers. In some cases this doesn't detract from the overall job function, but usually it's a matter of sacrificing security to get the other duties done, and having the title of "security" more for insurance purposes than otherwise... TRM

    Originally posted by Investigation
    If you want a good Security job, I would look at some in-house agencies here in Washington State. Chances are that you'll be compensated, and treated, better.

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  • TheRegulator
    replied
    Here Here!

    That's dead on... I wouldn't, and don't ask my Officers to do anything that's not directly related to the care, welfare, safety and security of the facility and persons they are responsible for. Like SecTrainer said, there's a time and place, but as a general rule, a S/O's primary function is just that... Security Officer. TRM

    Originally posted by FDG06
    Sorry, but be it a guard, officer, agent.. whatever, if I am in a designated security function as my #1 job discription, I am NOT cleaning, mopping, taking dictation, servicing candy or soda vending machines, washing the bosses car or any other duty which might compromise my primary job function or distract me from doing my primary job function, unless it is minor end of shift house keeping / cleaning, expected where ever one is employed.

    This would be especially true if this 2nd "maid / janitor servicde" job function was not made known to me apon or previous to my hire for job function #1.
    I probably would NOT work for a company who ask that of me either...in MHO they are buttering thier bread on both sides and have little concern for doing either job function to the best of thier ability or to the betterment of the client..if they need a meter reader, maid, janitor, then hire a real meter reader, maid or janitor to do that task..if you need a security guard, watch man, etc, then hire that & ask them to do just that..anything else is less then professional, actually its chicken $#!%...and people wonder why there is a need for unions!
    Yoda

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  • FDG06
    replied
    Sorry, but be it a guard, officer, agent.. whatever, if I am in a designated security function as my #1 job discription, I am NOT cleaning, mopping, taking dictation, servicing candy or soda vending machines, washing the bosses car or any other duty which might compromise my primary job function or distract me from doing my primary job function, unless it is minor end of shift house keeping / cleaning, expected where ever one is employed.

    This would be especially true if this 2nd "maid / janitor servicde" job function was not made known to me apon or previous to my hire for job function #1.
    I probably would NOT work for a company who ask that of me either...in MHO they are buttering thier bread on both sides and have little concern for doing either job function to the best of thier ability or to the betterment of the client..if they need a meter reader, maid, janitor, then hire a real meter reader, maid or janitor to do that task..if you need a security guard, watch man, etc, then hire that & ask them to do just that..anything else is less then professional, actually its chicken $#!%...and people wonder why there is a need for unions!
    Yoda

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Of course, there are situations where I'd expect an officer to grab a mob, a broom or a hose, and that's if there's a safety issue that has to be addressed promptly and the officer is in the best position to do so.

    On the other hand, if the spill in question were to involve any sort of potentially hazardous material and the officer isn't specifically trained to deal with it, I'd expect him to be doing other things such as notifying the right people, clearing the area, preventing others from entering the area, etc, assuming the situation is not so hazardous that he himself is required to evacuate based on the scene safety size-up. (Victims don't make good rescuers!)

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  • Eric
    replied
    I have seen job ad's up here as well for security involving cleaning, mostly at fitness clubs, where you take care of reception overnight as well.

    I guess this gets around the license issue

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  • Chucky
    replied
    IMO I would have to renegotiate the contract as in my state janitorial pays more than unarmed security. This is part of the reason people belittle security when they see them cleaning the floors.

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  • Professional Rent-a-Cop
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Its common for some "services companies" to run combine security and janitorial services. After all, the guard isn't actually "doing anything" while patrolling, so he can perform janitorial duties as well.

    One of the two local security companies also has a janitorial service. Considering their security personnel are completely unarmed (and have no communication), I'd say they're probably the janitorial staff, too.

    Don't let my inhouse managers hear this. At my inhouse job, we do mostly mopping and cleaning and less of monitoring cameras and observe/report, occassional enforce. The mop is the most used tool ("weapon of choice"?) at my inhouse property, chosen more often than OC, baton, firearm, or cuffs. Heh.

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  • Investigation
    replied
    Washington State Security Jobs

    If you want a good Security job, I would look at some in-house agencies here in Washington State. Chances are that you'll be compensated, and treated, better.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheRegulator
    replied
    [QUOTE=N. A. Corbier] Originally Posted by N. A. Corbier
    Considering their security personnel are completely unarmed (and have no communication), I'd say they're probably the janitorial staff, too.QUOTE]

    I was simply correcting your assumptions and out lining the truth about my organization. I'll direct the rest of my response to your private message in box. Take care, be safe, and have a great rest of the week folks... TRM

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  • Chucky
    replied
    An International company that I worked for had us reading and logging the water meters every shift. I guess they wanted to know how many times we flushed the hoppers at night.
    And the thing I hated the most was they had us reporting any slacking by their own in house cleaners. I'm sure that they could afford to have one of their own people do that job as IMO it has nothing to do with security or safety issues.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by TheRegulator
    Just figured I'd throw this out there, since you were completely off base and incorrect about the professional security organization that I proudly manage. Take care, and best wishes in your future endeavors. TRM
    Actually, I'm not "off base and incorrect" with my statement. When I name the company you manage, then you would know this because I will preface my statement with "Whatcom" or "that company you were referring to, SecTrainer."

    There are many "services companies" that combine security and janitorial services. There are some here in Wisconsin, there are many in Florida, and I'm sure there are some in your state, as well.

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