Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How long have you worked security?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    loss prevention for 8 months..i need a raise.

    Comment


    • #32
      I seen someone said something about buying equipment. My security company right now gets on my nerves sometimes lol. Im not the only one. some assignments when u are sitting in a primary spot of the place they have a electrict cord so u can run a heater etc. Its also in my contract about the heater. Its so we dont have to run are car when we are sitting. Sometimes many times they dont have the heater. So I went to a store a bought one for 20.00 just because im tired of having to call the 3rd in command boss and complain that i need so & so. This has happend with other equipment as well. They use to have a mag flashlight for each assignment. Then I never seen it again lol. So instead of all the mess i just bought some of my own stuff.

      I understand needing a riase currently my assignment pays 7.50 an hr. Im only 10 mins away from it so thats not bad with gas money etc. But if i was further away then i would need more money per hr for sure.

      Stay Safe All

      Comment


      • #33
        Alot of security companies are very very bad about providing OSHA required personal protective equipment. This includes enviornmental protection devices such as heaters, air conditioners, cool water supplies (gatorade, etc), and exposure to elements, as well as specific items such as safety goggles, steel toed boots, etc.

        Many companies will say, "The site must provide these items," however, they are incorrect and simply do not want to spend the money on PPE for something they hope won't bite them in the ass.

        OSHA requires that any occupational exposure to hazards must be mitigated by the employer, with accepted equipment to OSHA standards provided by the employer free of charge to all exposed employees. OSHA has been known to shut construction sites down for not having TP in the porta-potty. (I got to witness that, it was hilarious. The general contractor was fined for it, like 10,000 dollars per day of no TP in the potty.) Requiring employees to buy jackets or raincoats, for example, could be considered an OSHA violation, if exposure to cold and rain are an occupational hazard.

        I have seen clients who will turn the electricity off in the guard house to prevent the contractor from installing heaters and other high wattage devices, due to the increased bill. Guess who's getting the fine(s), btw?

        If the PPE is being stolen by guards, it is up to the company to replace the PPE. Period.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

        Comment


        • #34
          well i just decided to buy my own heater. like i said that way i dont have any more headaches. at least right now check back sunday when i go back to work lol. from what i was told by my LT, the Operations Boss took all the heaters out of the back of the supervisors cars and even took my work cell phone charger. I have a feeling he did this because he got pissed at Me.

          Supervisors come by at end of the shift if your going to be off for 1 or 2 days and pick up the post equipment. Sometimes they are too busy to make it to me and had me hide it in a bag someplace on the property. Then Cap told me we cant do that anymore cause a animal or a person got in the bag and drug the cell phone out. He said we will have to come out early. So i tell the other Supervisors. Well one friday morning i call my shift is over LT is not here. He said im sick bag it up. Keep in mind he is the shift boss at that time. I say ok and i said someone is coming to get it. He said yeah. Well he never came to get it and the stuff got rained on.

          But all the equipment worked everything was fine. Then I got kinda jumped up by the Cap. And something was said about having someones ass and i said i wont be given a reprimand for something that is not my fault. It was the Shift OIC. Anyways he said since the the stuff worked fine no one would be wrote up. But then my heater was taken and cell charger. anyways just a job gripe LOL.

          Comment


          • #35
            Did it for 11 years, until my last employer was forced out of business(loss of a major client, with his divorce fanning the fire).

            After that, most places either didn't want me, or I wouldn't work for them on a bet. Told a couple who were willing to give me a job that they had to pay me better for me to consider it. May sound conceited, but they knew as well as I did that I have the experience, training, and ability to justify asking for more than their normal starting wage, which they pay someone with no experience whatsoever.

            I got into about the only other thing I had any flair for; driving a truck. For 10 years, I've been driving concrete mixers, for much better wages and benefits than any security or even LE job I've ever had could or would offer. When you have a family to provide for as sole breadwinner, that means a lot.

            For a part time gig, and during the layoff season, I drive a taxi cab. Not bad money, and I do find the work interesting. And, we serve as the eyes and ears for the PD in a lot of situations. That, and helping them keep drunks off the road, they appreciate us more than they show.

            I'm considering becoming a reserve cop, but not at the expense of a lot of my time or own expense, especially for something that only pays a dollar a year.

            I recently applied for an armed security position that pays about $14 an hour to start, plus a $3.14 an hour differential of some sort. I'd at least like to know what this involves. Just had to fax my resume to some number I think is in Kansas. Hmmmm? For that kind of money, it is at least worth a look.
            Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by DMS 525
              Did it for 11 years, until my last employer was forced out of business(loss of a major client, with his divorce fanning the fire).

              After that, most places either didn't want me, or I wouldn't work for them on a bet. Told a couple who were willing to give me a job that they had to pay me better for me to consider it. May sound conceited, but they knew as well as I did that I have the experience, training, and ability to justify asking for more than their normal starting wage, which they pay someone with no experience whatsoever.

              I got into about the only other thing I had any flair for; driving a truck. For 10 years, I've been driving concrete mixers, for much better wages and benefits than any security or even LE job I've ever had could or would offer. When you have a family to provide for as sole breadwinner, that means a lot.

              For a part time gig, and during the layoff season, I drive a taxi cab. Not bad money, and I do find the work interesting. And, we serve as the eyes and ears for the PD in a lot of situations. That, and helping them keep drunks off the road, they appreciate us more than they show.

              I'm considering becoming a reserve cop, but not at the expense of a lot of my time or own expense, especially for something that only pays a dollar a year.

              I recently applied for an armed security position that pays about $14 an hour to start, plus a $3.14 an hour differential of some sort. I'd at least like to know what this involves. Just had to fax my resume to some number I think is in Kansas. Hmmmm? For that kind of money, it is at least worth a look.
              Commercial Haulers have unions, powerful ones at that. They're both construction and OTR hauler. I'd do it if I could drive a rig that big. Sure, the nights suck, and your never home, but your making a ton of cash and you've got benefits that the Teamsters generations ago fought for.

              Shift Differential? It may be Federal, in which that's what your going to pay your "federal employee health benefit" with, or it could be a night differential, or a hazard pay differential.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                Commercial Haulers have unions, powerful ones at that. They're both construction and OTR hauler. I'd do it if I could drive a rig that big. Sure, the nights suck, and your never home, but your making a ton of cash and you've got benefits that the Teamsters generations ago fought for.

                Shift Differential? It may be Federal, in which that's what your going to pay your "federal employee health benefit" with, or it could be a night differential, or a hazard pay differential.
                Thanks for the info. Figured it had to be something to do with the Feds, and I do believe their main office for hiring and such is in Topeka for this area.

                Funny you should mention the Teamsters. I am a Teamster. Local 90 here in Des Moines, although I am on withdraw status right now. I do plan to see about driving for another company with the Teamsters Union, but I will have to get my Class A CDL first.
                Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Reading back through these posts there was the one about the guy showing up with the Sig and no mag in it.

                  Several commented about how deadly that could be. I agree, just look at the Marine Barracks in Beirut. Marines without mags in either pistols or rifles because "didn't want to appear to take sides in the civil war". You know what happened there.

                  BTW, Security experience was in military (no warning shots, shoot to kill, welfare of hostages is not a factor), and airport security police after discharge, worked other places off and on but am starting a security business now.
                  My brother is a PD Sgt and Iam thinking about seeing if he wants to get involved as he is about ready to retire also.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Did I ever put down my history? Hell, recap time.

                    I got into private security in Florida, when I turned 18. Typical "this sucks" case. Was DEP for USAF, guaranteed Security Forces position. School decides to deny a credit from my first year of high school in Texas. The USAF can no longer guarantee my SF position, nor can they accept me, as I have to take summer school. The State of Florida decides to offer me an out, since I'd of turned 19 in summer school and the school would kick me out (All students must graduate by their 19th birthday. Go Florida!) Get a GED.

                    So, I get a GED, and get a summer job with a security company, guarding a defense contractor. USAF releases me from my contract as my GED invalidated it (They wouldn't accept GEDs at that time.) So, I continue in the civilian work force, for two warm body companies.

                    Second WBS I worked for was the USCG Air Station in Clearwater, Florida. This was in the mid 90s, so if anyone is familiar with that area, you know who I worked for and why I hate warm body security. I ran that station, basically, with a site supervisor who was a drunkard (The company authorized him to have beer on post to keep his mouth shut), and a rotating set of night guards who were either retirees or the mentally deficient.

                    A year of that, with the client giving us more and more authority on base due to a good team at night, the contract company stopped paying us on time. They'd pay about 65% of everyone on time, blame it on ADP, and then refuse to issue a new check till the next 2 weeks. I gave them 2 chances, then quit.

                    Went to the next company, where I stayed for about 8-9 years. In 2004, I moved up to Wisconsin with my girlfriend, and been up here since. In that time, I've opened a small computer consultant business, lived off it for awhile (Its contract work. We all love contract work, especially when its slow!), the occasional temp job, etc. All while saving money to open a security company.

                    I've worked armed and unarmed security, primarly uniformed. I was a "survelience operator" for a remote camera monitoring gig that my former employer tried through their PI firm, it sorta failed. Instead of using IP technology, it was some one's closed source proprietary "solution in a box," and required installing 14.4 modems. Low resolution cameras, bad frame rates, etc. Many of the folks working on that all said, "Should of done this with DSL."
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I don't think I ever elaberated on my back goround (deep breath). So here does.

                      In 1977 a year out of high school I started security only after a few years of being in other departments for the the now long gone Circus World theme park. Put about seven and a half years into that place. The previosu years were food services (shudder) and operations (running rides, etc. - double shudder). The last five where in house security and I raised up in the ranks in just a year. I must admit to this day it was the most enjoyable job I ever had in the private sector. The benefits were almost unlimited and the pay scale kept going up the longer you stayed on. You met every kind of person from around the world along with celebrities and big wigs of other theme parks. I saw this place change owners three times and the third time was not the charm. We all in security got our pink slips in 1985 and some WBC got the job. I don?t remember who they were.

                      Shortly there after I got on with the also now gone Mass Brothers department stores as a Store Detective and after about two years made corporate Detective. In 1991 a merge that was really a hostile take over by the Burdines outfits had me pounding the streets again. I went into uniform work for some WBCs a while and I honestly have to say I hated it. I was a part time police officer for about five years with a small PD but I did it only to get the experience and street smarts. I was more interested in the forensics and prevention fields of law enforcement rather than intervention work. While working a full time guard job and police work I went to school and got my degree in criminal justice. That was a heard time for me because I was dealing with a terminally ill mother and aging father (they did a lot for me and they deserved as much time and help as I could give them) along with trying to work and go to school. I left the PD on PLOA to focus on the full time security job I had and focus on school better. People ask why didn?t I just go full time LEO and my answer to that was most agencies has a freeze on hiring for along time and those that were hiring wanted people with full time experience and a completed degree. Out of state or other counties were to far away because of my parents. By the time I got done with school and my leave of absence time had elapsed my standards were expired. I failed to renew my standards in time which to this day I keep kicking myself for it.

                      My last uniform job was in house for a company that made safety devices for cars like airbags, etc. That place got sold in the two short years I was there and needless to say once again a WBC got the job and away we went. Each time a WBC came in they never wanted any of us that worked there. I assume it was because they brought in there own people or they wanted people they could maybe, control? Who knows? I am presently working as an armed security escort officer for a small firm for about five years now. Which once again is being threatened with cut backs and contracts getting eaten up by the WBCs making cheaper bids. Makes you wonder about the security field sometimes to why it is so volatile.
                      My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

                      -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

                      -It's just a job kid deal with it

                      -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        They want to replace everyone there because they don't know how you were trained, and they may have to pay you more. But, most importantly, you don't do things their way, you do them the client's way. And they will determine how the client's wishes are carried out - not the client.
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          11 years last month. I've done a hell of a lot of things in this business - uniformed and plainclothes guard, LPO, money and personnel escort, bodyguard, site supervisor, managing supervisor, security investigator...

                          I like to say that I have done just about everything in security that doesn't involve a gun.

                          Right now I'm having a lot of fun as a Security Guard in a retail setting - deterring, arresting, whatever. Love it. A lot.

                          wjohnc
                          Rule #1: Go home at the end of the day in an upright position, with everything attached, and with peace of mind for having done the job well.
                          "I won't be wronged. I won't be insulted. I won't be laid a-hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them." - John Wayne (in his last movie 'The Shootist')

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by wjohnc
                            11 years last month. I've done a hell of a lot of things in this business - uniformed and plainclothes guard, LPO, money and personnel escort, bodyguard, site supervisor, managing supervisor, security investigator...

                            I like to say that I have done just about everything in security that doesn't involve a gun.

                            Right now I'm having a lot of fun as a Security Guard in a retail setting - deterring, arresting, whatever. Love it. A lot.

                            wjohnc
                            You did unarmed money escort? Not meaning to be a [email protected] but what would or could you have done if an attempt was made? The others I can see but not the money escort.

                            Sorry if I misread your staement but I don't think I did.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Did I do this one yet?

                              Here's the breakdown:

                              Out of high school, I worked for 2 years in fast-food, ending up in management. Talking to our contract guard one night (this was a rough area), I discovered he was making .25 an hour more than I was for 1/16th of the work, so I joined on with his company.

                              It was the OG of WBS companies, Wells-Fargo Guard Services. Did that for a year or so before I quit in disgust.

                              Went to work for a local indian tribe as tribal security, transferring into their casino security division after only a few months because it paid more, and offered lots more benefits. Became a supervisor there, and left after about 2 years.

                              Worked for the state for a few years in a limited-capacity LE/security position in downtown Seattle, doing battle with the junkies and hookers.

                              Left there to work for a county sheriff's office in California, initially as a correctional deputy, then into street patrol.

                              Left there (mostly for pay and lack-of-advancement reasons) to work as a police officer in Alaska.

                              Left Alaska late last year after some health and family issues forced my hand, now working as a contract officer locally in the Seattle area. It is a WBS company, but I'm assigned to the one decent contract they have, armed officer for the feds.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by ACP01
                                You did unarmed money escort? Not meaning to be a [email protected] but what would or could you have done if an attempt was made? The others I can see but not the money escort.

                                Sorry if I misread your staement but I don't think I did.

                                Umm, you did, sort of. Another dude had the money, I looked out for him and the cash. I'd be in soft uniform and looking at everything and everyone else, not him or the cash directly, just the direction they were headed.

                                Secondly, incidents of robbery in this province are increasing - last year in this city we had about two dozen hold-ups and perhaps 6 or 8 muggings (I know, big deal, but it is when you're used to almost nothing - thank you OxyContin ). So, while it doesn't take my edge, any risk expected against me or the dude or the cash was minimal.

                                Thirdly, my direction was that lives, not money, was the primary concern, and that if - IF - somebody got close enough then let them have the money as long as no-one got hurt (not sure if I subscribe to that practice personally, but I do what I'm told, you know?)

                                wjohnc

                                ----

                                the purpose of life is to leave this world a better place than it was when you came into it
                                Rule #1: Go home at the end of the day in an upright position, with everything attached, and with peace of mind for having done the job well.
                                "I won't be wronged. I won't be insulted. I won't be laid a-hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them." - John Wayne (in his last movie 'The Shootist')

                                Comment

                                Leaderboard

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X