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  • How long have you worked security?

    I have worked 4 and a half years now at it and still love it!
    Many of you reading this have worked far longer though, and I humbly tip my hat to you.
    Observe and report what you saw with a good flashlight.
    Bedtime at sunrise

  • #2
    I have been a security officer for 1 month. I spent 3 years as a police explorer and i have 4 yrs as a firefighter. I am only 20.
    Robert
    Here endith the lesson

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    • #3
      I have worked security for a year, left to try out some different jobs and just came back to security in the last couple months.

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      • #4
        Been in security for two months. Been a Security Officer-First Class for 3 weeks.

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        • #5
          I've been in security for 12 years, this is the first year that I am opening a security business up here in lovely Wisconsin.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #6
            Hey, good luck with your business N.A.C
            Observe and report what you saw with a good flashlight.
            Bedtime at sunrise

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            • #7
              AZ i was a junior firefighter. Sorry i meant to write i have 2 years as a fire explorer and 2 as a military firefighter. I was tired..
              Robert
              Here endith the lesson

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 3rd_shift
                Hey, good luck with your business N.A.C
                Thanks. Hopefully, I can hire professional people who I don't have to throttle on a daily basis, and who realize that when I ask them to take 5 bucks out of their pay check for uniforms and duty gear, they're not getting a POS uniform from the dime store, they're getting good uniforms, and good duty gear - complete set. Those that don't want to... I expect my gear and uniforms back in working order.

                And after you pay me what I paid for the gear, ITS YOURS.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
                  Have fun getting people to work for you if they have to purchase their own equipment. I would never work somewhere where I had to purchase equipment that was only going to be used at my job.
                  You are not from Florida, obviously. Every security officer, in most companies, purchase EVERYTHING. From their duty rig to their uniforms to their weapon. In Wisconsin, as well, most officers (There is such a thing in Wisconsin as a Private Police Officer, as well) are required to purchase their entire rig, their uniforms, everything on day one of employment.

                  You also seem that you would not work for a professional security company where you would be required to intervene on behalf of the client or a victim, as well. There are companies, I am told, that pay their employees to be "observers" without getting their hands dirty, however, I do not run such a company. I dislike being sued over vicarious liability.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #10
                    My company does supply uniforms to us. But they arent always new and sometimes not in the best of shape. Same goes for duty gear. So i have OPTED to buy my own pants and Tact shirts. I also have my own duty gear. I would rather have my own stuff cuz i know where it came from and that i will always have good gear that is always with me and not getting misused.
                    Last edited by Arff312; 10-04-2005, 03:44 AM.
                    Robert
                    Here endith the lesson

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                    • #11
                      State Law does not. The industry does.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How long have you worked security

                        For the "good of the order," the following is submitted. Sometimes we have a habit of forgetting the small things. I first was exposed to this while attending Air/Security Police training at Lackland AFB, TX in 1968.


                        Are the ?Ten Deadly Sins? or ?Ten Commandments of Security and Law Enforcement? understood by all members of the security force? Are these sins or commandments re-stated at ALL roll calls and/or guard mounts? If not, explain why not? In this business the trifles kill you, try to remember that.

                        *TEN DEADLY SINS

                        1. Your Attitude ? If you fail to keep your mind on the job while on patrol or you carry home problems into the field you will start to make errors. It can cost you or other fellow security force members their lives.

                        2. Tombstone Courage ? No one doubts that you are brave. But in any situation where time allows wait for the back up. There are few instances where alone, unaided, you should try and make a dangerous apprehension.

                        3. Not Enough Rest ? To do your job you must be alert. Being sleepy or asleep on the job is not only against regulations but you endanger yourself, the air base and your fellow security forces.

                        4. Taking A Bad Position ? Never let anyone you are questioning or about to stop get in a better position than you and your vehicle. There is no such thing as a routine call or stop.

                        5. Danger Signs ? As a security forces member you will get to recognize ?danger signs.? Movements, strange cars, warnings that should alert you to watch your step and approach with caution. Know your post, your workplace or air base and watch out for what is ?out of place.?

                        6. Failure to Watch Hands of A Suspect ? Is he or she reaching for a weapon or getting ready to strike you? Where else can a potential killer strike but from his or her hands.

                        7. Relaxing Too Soon ? The ?rut? of false or nuisance alarms is quite serious. Walking in and asking if the place is being held up is stupid. Observe the activity. Never take any call as routine or just another false or nuisance alarm. It?s your life on the line.

                        8. Improper Use or No Use of Handcuffs ? Once you have made an arrest or apprehension, handcuff the suspect properly! See that the hands than can harm or kill are safely cuffed and double locked.

                        9. No Search Or Poor Search ? There are so many places to hide weapons that your failure to search is a crime against fellow security forces. Many criminals carry several weapons and are able and prepared to use them against you.

                        10. Dirty Or Inoperative Weapon ? Is your weapon clean? Will it fire? What of your ammunition? When did you last fire so that you can hit a target in combat conditions? What is the sense of carrying any firearm you do not know how to use or may not work? (*Source: Air Force Security Police Academy)

                        A sheriff's deputy had the left side of his face disfigured by a handcuff ratchet.

                        Enjoy the day,
                        Bill

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                        • #13
                          I've been in security since 1982. I have seen a lot change since i began my work, but I will tell you, police officers are so helpful to have around. It really is great that we, in the security industry, can work with the law enforcement community so well. The officers that I know are so appreciative of my work. They say that without our guys at this mall, that they would have a lot more work to do on a shift! Thanks guys! YOU COPS ROCK!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                            10. Dirty Or Inoperative Weapon ? Is your weapon clean? Will it fire? What of your ammunition? When did you last fire so that you can hit a target in combat conditions? What is the sense of carrying any firearm you do not know how to use or may not work? (*Source: Air Force Security Police Academy)

                            A sheriff's deputy had the left side of his face disfigured by a handcuff ratchet.

                            Enjoy the day,
                            Bill
                            I knew a police officer who's weapon had a broken firing pin. She went to fire it on the range, and the weapon failed to discharge. It was a GLOCK, at that!

                            I also knew a security officer in Florida who was an ESI graduate, and rarely checked his weapon. I was bored, and asked him for his weapon, not an official inspection, just boredom, because it was a chrome personally owned Smith and Wesson .357. Upon looking at the firing pin, I noticed it was missing, it was one of the floater pins. He nearly deficated himself.

                            People - your partner, the general public, your client - all expect you to be able to do what your trained to do with that weapon. If it malfunctions due to stupidity or lack of forethought, then you have failed all three.

                            The State entrusts you with the power to take a life for the protection of another person when issuing you a license to carry an open firearm as a security officer. As the State of Florida has said numerous times: The duties of a security officer raise them to a higher standard, and therefore, the Concealed Weapons Permit standard does not apply. In the public interest, we regulate their duty weapons and authorize them to carry openly (Illegal in Florida) for those duties.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                              There are companies, I am told, that pay their employees to be "observers"
                              My company allows physical intervention when an individual is being assaulted or the s/o is in imminent danger of being attacked and cannot retreat. Our duty is to deter, detect, and report. Depending on the site, this may be completely acceptable, in fact, preferred. There is a role for both types of security. It really depends on what provides the client with the security they should have. In some cases, I believe that to deter, detect, and report is the better choice. If a corporate site has sufficient security procedures in place (especially against workplace violence) and maintains a tightly controlled perimeter and strict access control, it's unlikely that the 'bad guy' will breech security before the police can arrive.

                              To answer the threads question, I worked security p/t in NYC from 1983 thru 1990, and started again in New England in 2003 to present. I also have my own security-consulting firm.
                              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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