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What state agency do you answer to?

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Wisconsin's PI system is strange to me. In Florida, to be a licensed PI, you must have approximately 2 years of "internship" as a "Class CC" Private Investigator Intern. You may not work for yourself, and are paired with a "sponsor" who oversees your entire 2 year internship. I say two year because you have to have a certain number of logged investigative hours, which equals about 2 years of 40 hour weeks. Once you have done this, you can then be a full fledged PI on your "Class C" license, open your own office, etc.

    Intrestingly enough, a full "Class C" licensee could carry a 9mm concealed anywhere in the state on their "Class G" license, much like a security officer can openly. Civilian CCW rules against carrying on school property, in bars, etc, don't apply to that license. If they were performing security services (had a "Class D" license) and had their "Class G" license, they could carry a 9mm openly. That's how you could tell if someone was a PI or not with a security company, they carried 9mm.

    Florida used to accept LE experience as "evidence of investigatory duties," but changed it so that you have to demonstrate that your primary duties were the investigation of criminal offenses, etc. i.e. a street cop who does not investigate crimes (turns them over to a detective) has no "experience" for the Class C license, but an officer who either had to investigate his own offenses (catch your own) or who was a detective assigned to investigate crimes did have experience.

    Florida's PI industry has a very powerful lobby called the FALI, or Florida Association of Licensed Investigators. I don't know how powerful or infuentual the Wisconsin version of FALI is (I've been to their site), but FALI has had a lot of Chapter 493's stupidity removed from the PI industry. You don't have to have a seperate manager's license for the agency (A security agency must be managed by an "M" manager, who has to have 4 years of experience in security.), they were allowed to have 9mms for years, and aren't required to keep hundreds of thousands of dollars in liability insurance.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You mean like arming PIs?

    YES!!! PI's face more dangers with people than you can imagine. Like police detectives, we deal with violent criminals who don't like our "snooping". Thats why I like working for judges because if I show cause, the judge will issue me a temporary CCW permit. I've been attacked & assaulted too many times by gangbangers, dirtbag low-lives and other criminals who don't like me sticking my nose in there business. I have a group from Burlington (freemasons) who are still trying to figure out who exactly I am and where I live. I'm always armed at home because of this.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    In some cities I have worked in, you get a an ID and licensing that state the difference "PI vs. Security vs. Patrol Security". They regulate things pretty heavy out there. Interestingly enough, where I am at now, requires no licensing, and has few regulations concerning security. Now, this doesnt mean we conduct ourselves in an manner different than the licensed end, its just nice to not get poked with a fee to work!

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Special Investigator
    I agree. But the liberals who run the DRL don't want to listen to what others have to say. They would have to hear suggestions/comments that they don't want to hear.
    You mean like arming PIs?

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    They need to bring back the department's advisory council. You know, the one made up of PIs.

    I agree. But the liberals who run the DRL don't want to listen to what others have to say. They would have to hear suggestions/comments that they don't want to hear.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    They need to bring back the department's advisory council. You know, the one made up of PIs.

    Actually, what they should do is seperate PI and Security licenses all together. Then bring the council back.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    What happens to "Blue Knight Police," same thing? Also, how is DRL doing this? I can't find a RL section on the word "police," so the only way I can figure it is that they're simply blanket denying anyone with the word "police" in their name. If this is so, then I'm saddened. If they felt that it should not be in the name, they should seek to change Wisconsin Administrative Code (RLs) or Wisconsin Statute.

    In the last year alone, many regulations are being changed, updated, etc because a lot of security companies are abusing and violating the regs. Its a bigger problem than you might think. I 'think' (I could be wrong) anyone who uses the word police in their name, discription, etc will be forced to change or modify or they might be denied renewal of their license. I know the the forementioned companies in Kenosha are currently fighting the DRL's decision. We'll have to wait and see what happens.

    The liberals run the DRL and you know how restrictive they are. They claim to know whats best for everyone.

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Special Investigator
    Nathan, I made a phone call yesterday to the Dept of Regulation & Licensing in Madison. The woman I spoke to stated that private security companies, and its emplotee's/agents CANNOT use the word "police" in and of itself, in name, on their uniforms such as on badges, shoulder patches, etc and vehicles. Use of the word "police" is a violation of DRL regulations. The word "Private" must be included.

    If it says "police" anyware on your uniform, you ban be arrested/charged for impersonation of a police officer.

    If you still don't belive me, the give 'em a call if ya like.
    What happens to "Blue Knight Police," same thing? Also, how is DRL doing this? I can't find a RL section on the word "police," so the only way I can figure it is that they're simply blanket denying anyone with the word "police" in their name.

    If this is so, then I'm saddened. If they felt that it should not be in the name, they should seek to change Wisconsin Administrative Code (RLs) or Wisconsin Statute.

    Leave a comment:


  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    In Kenosha alone, there are two companies, "Schmitt Security POLICE" and "Kenosha Private POLICE" which are duly licensed by the DRL and have marked patrol vehicles that say, respectively, "Security Police" and "Private Police" on them.

    The Kenosha Police Department has advised me that this is PERFECTLY LEGAL. I can have a sworn law enforcement officer over at Officer.com come here and note that he did in fact see a "Kenosha Private Police" vehicle driving through Kenosha.

    Schmitt Security Police & Kenosha Private Police are older agencies. When they adopted those names the regulations were different. All company names must be approved by the DRL. Currently these two companies are being forced to change their names by the DRL or their license to operate may be revoked. Schmitt & Kenosha pvt police are fighting this currently.

    A police officer can tell you anything but it does not mean it is legal. There are a lot of cops who don't know all the regulations set forth by the DRL.

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  • Special Investigator
    replied
    Nathan, I made a phone call yesterday to the Dept of Regulation & Licensing in Madison. The woman I spoke to stated that private security companies, and its emplotee's/agents CANNOT use the word "police" in and of itself, in name, on their uniforms such as on badges, shoulder patches, etc and vehicles. Use of the word "police" is a violation of DRL regulations. The word "Private" must be included.

    If it says "police" anyware on your uniform, you can be arrested/charged for impersonation of a police officer.

    If you still don't belive me, the give 'em a call if ya like.
    Last edited by Special Investigator; 11-15-2006, 02:42 PM.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Bridgegate
    Something else to consider for the debate in here:

    I don't know if it's the same over there, but when Oregon first started regulating security back in the early 90's, they enacted a similar rule about not using the word "POLICE" in the company name... Henceforth, no company could do so.... Oregon DOES, however, have a grandfather clause for just about all of their new laws, and any company that had already been operating for xx amount of years was not affected by the new law.... Nathan mentioned that one of those companies had been using the title for 50 years... If Wisconsin does something similar, it probably wouldn't apply to them...

    //Food for thought.
    I had thought about the grandfather clause, but they keep reapplying for licensing after letting it run out. If you lose your license, you lose your grandfather clause, one would think.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Caesar
    Save ya some trouble Nathan.

    From O.com

    I think Mr S. hit the nail on the head. It dosen't matter if using the word police is against the law if it's not enforced.
    Thanks, Caesar. Huey was ... fascinated by it. When I first came here, I thought the library guard was a cop, his patches said "Kenosha Private Police." Like, some kind of city cop.

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  • Charger
    replied
    Something else to consider for the debate in here:

    I don't know if it's the same over there, but when Oregon first started regulating security back in the early 90's, they enacted a similar rule about not using the word "POLICE" in the company name... Henceforth, no company could do so.... Oregon DOES, however, have a grandfather clause for just about all of their new laws, and any company that had already been operating for xx amount of years was not affected by the new law.... Nathan mentioned that one of those companies had been using the title for 50 years... If Wisconsin does something similar, it probably wouldn't apply to them...

    //Food for thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • cp73
    replied
    Private Investigator Licensing Board, a part of the State Attorney General's office.

    They license all Private Patrolmen, Private Investigators, Process Servers, Polygraph Examiners, and Canine Handlers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Save ya some trouble Nathan.

    From O.com

    I think Mr S. hit the nail on the head. It dosen't matter if using the word police is against the law if it's not enforced.

    Leave a comment:

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