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  • kingsman
    replied
    I had one guy yell at me when I worked security at the hotel in New Orleans when I missed his wakeup call. The hotel had no way to track wakeup calls, nit even a sheet, so I created a excel sheet for them, then I taught the desk clerk how to use the desk alarm clock once I found out where they had it hidden.

    I don't know why he expected first class service from a hotel that didn't have enough staff and was half demolished after Katrina.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Jackhole
    No you didn't, you chose to do so.
    It was cheaper than hiring a lawyer when he sued us & even more important in the hotel business, loosing his companies business. (Hotels live by repeat business)

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard
    The rich SOBs can't afford an alarm clock? Maybe it's because I don't travel much or the fact that when I do travel I stay in crappy little 1 star motels but I never set a wake up call.
    Come to think of it, I've never stayed in a hotel room without an alarm clock...

    Leave a comment:


  • Jackhole
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    We've had to pay for a flight for someone who missed his flight because he did not receive/answer his wakeup call.
    No you didn't, you chose to do so.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    We've had to pay for a flight for someone who missed his flight because he did not receive/answer his wakeup call. It cost the hotel money. Our business is loss prevention so.... it became part of our duties.

    There was a case 3 or 4 years ago where a famous golfer missed the tee-off time because he did not receive the call or wakeup. The hotel was blamed.
    The rich SOBs can't afford an alarm clock? Maybe it's because I don't travel much or the fact that when I do travel I stay in crappy little 1 star motels but I never set a wake up call.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Yeah. I think this is the difference between proprietary and contract security. You can also look like a hotel employee. When we open a door, its like the police opening a door.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Wow. We were never authorized to enter a guest's room, it was considered an invasion of privacy at best or burglary at worst. If they did not wake up from their wakeup call... They were rung again and that was it. It was not a security issue.
    We've had to pay for a flight for someone who missed his flight because he did not receive/answer his wakeup call. It cost the hotel money. Our business is loss prevention so.... it became part of our duties.

    There was a case 3 or 4 years ago where a famous golfer missed the tee-off time because he did not receive the call or wakeup. The hotel was blamed.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingsman
    replied
    The only time I ever entered a guests room as a night auditor was with police to expell 6 kids who thought our no party policy was flexible. It wasn't.

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  • kingsman
    replied
    The owners of the property where I work don't trust us with keys either. The other night I had two domestic disputes, an open door in a vacant building, a wild party, and 6 juveniles causing problems all at the same time.

    And while I called twice for the local PD to respond, they did not show for nearly an hour, and then wanted only to deal with the least of the problems (the open door) as they had not been dispatched for the other problems. The party noise problem, called in at appox. 11:30 p.m. along with all the other problems, wasn't answered until 5:30 a.m.

    I also had my car stoned the next night, never saw who did it. Thank god there was no serious damage.

    This ain't dodge city, and I ain't Bill Hickock.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Wow. We were never authorized to enter a guest's room, it was considered an invasion of privacy at best or burglary at worst. If they did not wake up from their wakeup call... They were rung again and that was it. It was not a security issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Part of our job in hotel security is to enter every room where the guest does not respond to his wakeup call to make sure they have not passed out, or worse! You'd be surprised how heavy sleepers some people are!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    The property management company that contracted my former employer did not trust security to have a key. This is because it was "section 8" housing, and the Tampa Police Department used the "agent of owner" to grant consent to search units without renter's knowledge. Basically, they would make the untrained guard give them the keys for whatever units they wanted to look into. "You do this or you're obstructing," etc.

    The management company's solution to this was that no security guard would have access to the keys, ever. We've had people become unresponsive, etc. If we called the police, they would say, "Without a key, we can't do anymore than you can." At one point, due to the residents becoming concerned, I called the fire department. They made dynamic entry to find that the tenant had moved out in the middle of the night and not told anyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by IB107
    we didnt have that option :P, the guy had changed his owen lock :P which was sorta against lease policies
    Sounds like he has something to hide.

    Leave a comment:


  • IB107
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    When I worked apartments we usually had a group that consisted of at least one person from security, the complex manager, maintenance, and other personnel while entering with a key for a health and welfare check. The police were only called if we found the person deceased.
    we didnt have that option :P, the guy had changed his owen lock :P which was sorta against lease policies

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by IB107
    true but the pd had other things to worry about that night, had 30 officers out looking for a missing child :P, so they had to run
    When I worked apartments we usually had a group that consisted of at least one person from security, the complex manager, maintenance, and other personnel while entering with a key for a health and welfare check. The police were only called if we found the person deceased.

    Leave a comment:

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