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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    I've been active in disaster responce and have worked several shelter assignements so I've gotten pretty good and knowing what I need to do the job. I get my shelter assignment, drive there and report to the shelter manager, ask for a spot out of the way in a corner and set up my table, my chairs, cot and sleeping gear. I've even started prepacking printed signs to ID my area as a Emergency Communications, Ham Radio station in case anyone has any doubt why I'm there. Since I have my own bedding and equiptment and always have 72 hours of food and water I don't have to burden the shelter resorces with anything unnecessary. Here's another shot of my shelter set up with the cot in the background.
    Attached Files

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Dude! What the hell is on the bottom? It looks like an older MDT from Motorolla? Do you have it decoding packet TX or something?
    No it's a TV. The same one I have in this photo taken when I worked another Hurricane shelter a couple of years back. This pic was taken at the shelter at Plaqumine High School in Iberville Parish during Tropical Storm Isadore. Shown are (amoung other things) the TV, My Portable Ham Radio which I crossband through the radio in my car, a trunktracker scanner, FRS radio for shelter staff comms, battery op lamp for late night use and headphones to use when shelteries are sleeping.
    Now when I work Hurricane shelter duty, that card table becomes my Command Post.
    Attached Files

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    EMT/GUARD a/k/a Security Officer,

    My chin just hit the desk after I saw the pictures of your home/car. They could have used you down south when Katrina hit....a genuine command post.
    I did use some of it during and after Katrina. I obeyed my town's mandatory evacuation order and took the cat and my lady love to stay with friends. As the winds died down I used the ham radio to give damage reports to the Local and State EOCs as I drove home. I spent the rest of that monday chainsawing the trees that had fallen against my home and blocked my front door. The next day, Tuesday, I used the Ham radio to contact the EOC in St John Parish and got instruction on which roads were open and what I needed to have to get past the police roadblocks to releive my supervisor who had rode out the storm in the guard shack at the plant. Tuesday evening I was at work while my lady, also a Ham, drove to Ascension Parish and volunteered for the night shift at the EOC there. By wednesday moring, after monitoring the action around New Orleans on my scanner all night, I was back in my car and used the ham radio to check in with my girl at the EOC. We went home to rest and that evening returned to Ascension Parish where she volunteered for another night at the ham radio station there while I went to the Lamar Dixion Expo Center where several thousand evacuees and releif workers were being sheltered and staged. During the time I was at the shelter I used my handheld portable to crossband through my car radio to the repeater the Parish EOC was on and also relayed traffic to the State EOC. The radio in my car acted as a crossband repeater. After about 15 hours of shelter work my shift was over and I was ready to go home. Katrina was still causing problems just a few miles down the road but I was going home to get some rest. This is how I looked before I left the shelter which housed approx 1200 evacuees that night and was patroled my a combination of Sheriff's deputies and National Guardsmen with M-16s.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by EMTGuard; 12-19-2005, 09:20 AM.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard
    Nothing is up with that. It's a great scanner that is used every day. Just like my Pro-91 and my BC-245, and several others, which are also no longer made.
    I use the BC-780 for monitoring and recording my local Fire dispatch and Fire ground communications. Dispatch and coms are on a parish wide EDACS 800MHz trunked system but the local FD, which I used to work for, uses talkgroups on the City of Baton Rouge Motorola 800MHz trunked system for it's Fireground and Talk channels. The BC-780 is almost exclusively used for monitoring them and I have it wired to my computer Input line. The computer records the audio from that channel using a program called Scanner Recorder which acts like a VOX recorder, only recording when someone transmits then standing by when nothing is breaking squelch. Each day's recordings are saved as a audio file that I can listen to later when I have time.
    Other scanners monitor separate systems. I have a desktop scanner which is programmed with only Business freqs and another with only railroad and marine frequencies. My old Pro-91 trunktracker is just for listening to the local PD and Sheriff. My BC-245 trunktracker is primarily used for monitoring Baton Rouge Fire and EMS traffic. I have VHF/UHF Ham radios and FRS and GMRS radios for transmitting and my DX-390 radio pulls in the shortwave signals below 30MHz. There's even CB and weather alert radios on the desk.
    As you pointed out, the BC-780 isn't the most current scanner but it is still quite popular.
    The fact is that until all the local agencies complete Rebanding it will be very useful to me. After Rebanding it will most likely be used for scanning other services and I'll upgrade to a newer scanner such as the BC-396.
    Another scanner that isn't being made anymore is the Pro-93 trunktracker. That doesn't mean that it isn't useful. I take my '93 to work with me every night to monitor the State Police and area Fire Department dispatches. And it came it real handy for monitoring the action after Hurricane Katrina from my post just outside New Orleans.
    And that is what is up with that.
    How about a photo of my car shack wich includes traunktracker scanners, Kenwood TM-D700 VHF/UHF running APRS tracking programs, TV, 2.4Gig wireless camera receiver and more?
    Dude! What the hell is on the bottom? It looks like an older MDT from Motorolla? Do you have it decoding packet TX or something?

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Stupid indeed. Who will obey it? Good citizens? Yes. Criminals? I don't think they are worried about it since they are probably using it to commit a felony anyhow.
    Indeed. I used to laugh at a supervisor who threw a scanner on the front dash. He swore it was legal, till I pulled out the Gould Book and showed him. He put it underneath the dash when leaving Pinellas County, because everyone in Pinellas loved us.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    [QUOTE=Echos13
    Really one of those stupid Florida laws.
    [/QUOTE]

    Stupid indeed. Who will obey it? Good citizens? Yes. Criminals? I don't think they are worried about it since they are probably using it to commit a felony anyhow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    replied
    Wow! Great stuff there indeed. And, yes after some research your right about the BC-780XLT. It seems to still be a hot item.

    As for having such equipment in vehicles here in Florida it's limited. Law states unless your public safety or have a ham license it's unlawful to have radio scanners in your vehicle. Well, it's got a loop hole. Anything "installed" is unlawful. Hand held you can use, and if you run a base unit by a portable battery pack it's legal. But if it's bolted, mounted or made part of the vehicle you run the risk of getting charged and it being taken by LE. Most of the LEO's here are understanding. But others have made it clear they don't care who you are in the private sector.

    Really one of those stupid Florida laws.

    All my stuff is to big for my SUV. I use to have a hand held but it got stolen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    Yes. The more sophisticated the encryption platform the more difficult it is to decrypt. We have gone from single transmissions to constant key. When you listen in, trash.
    I glad I live in New England. They are extremely slow in upgrading their communications equipment because the towns will have a fit at budget time since there isn't even enough $$ for the school systems.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    EMT/GUARD a/k/a Security Officer,

    My chin just hit the desk after I saw the pictures of your home/car. They could have used you down south when Katrina hit....a genuine command post.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Echos13
    Whoa! Those all are pretty nice set ups. Makes my office look way under equiped. And I thought I was an electronic monitoring junkie.

    BTW: Whats up with the BC-780XLT? They are no longer made but they still sell for a pretty price! What's up with that?
    Nothing is up with that. It's a great scanner that is used every day. Just like my Pro-91 and my BC-245, and several others, which are also no longer made.
    I use the BC-780 for monitoring and recording my local Fire dispatch and Fire ground communications. Dispatch and coms are on a parish wide EDACS 800MHz trunked system but the local FD, which I used to work for, uses talkgroups on the City of Baton Rouge Motorola 800MHz trunked system for it's Fireground and Talk channels. The BC-780 is almost exclusively used for monitoring them and I have it wired to my computer Input line. The computer records the audio from that channel using a program called Scanner Recorder which acts like a VOX recorder, only recording when someone transmits then standing by when nothing is breaking squelch. Each day's recordings are saved as a audio file that I can listen to later when I have time.
    Other scanners monitor separate systems. I have a desktop scanner which is programmed with only Business freqs and another with only railroad and marine frequencies. My old Pro-91 trunktracker is just for listening to the local PD and Sheriff. My BC-245 trunktracker is primarily used for monitoring Baton Rouge Fire and EMS traffic. I have VHF/UHF Ham radios and FRS and GMRS radios for transmitting and my DX-390 radio pulls in the shortwave signals below 30MHz. There's even CB and weather alert radios on the desk.
    As you pointed out, the BC-780 isn't the most current scanner but it is still quite popular.
    The fact is that until all the local agencies complete Rebanding it will be very useful to me. After Rebanding it will most likely be used for scanning other services and I'll upgrade to a newer scanner such as the BC-396.
    Another scanner that isn't being made anymore is the Pro-93 trunktracker. That doesn't mean that it isn't useful. I take my '93 to work with me every night to monitor the State Police and area Fire Department dispatches. And it came it real handy for monitoring the action after Hurricane Katrina from my post just outside New Orleans.
    And that is what is up with that.
    How about a photo of my car shack wich includes traunktracker scanners, Kenwood TM-D700 VHF/UHF running APRS tracking programs, TV, 2.4Gig wireless camera receiver and more?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • S/O245
    replied
    I want to get the new digital scanner. Many Police/Fire Depts and others have upgraded to the new systems. Hamilton County Depts and the City of Cincinnati changed. I think it took Cincinnati a little longer because of all the personnel they had and it costs money lol. Many other depts in Indiana and KY around us are changing. I hear Dearborn County in Indiana if they have not already they are going to change. Butler County Ohio depts are going to change. I think however Hamilton County Fire Depts may still be on the old system I dont know if its the money thing or what. But they will if they have not already change the Fire to the new system.

    Also I know alot of Officers have nextel and have a talkgroup they use on the cells to. I have a nextel phone. I would like it if my security agency changed to nextel becuase of the radio function in it. Right now we use verizon cell phones and im not sure what brand the radios are. My post i just carry a cell.

    Stay Safe All

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    replied
    Whoa! Those all are pretty nice set ups. Makes my office look way under equiped. And I thought I was an electronic monitoring junkie.

    BTW: Whats up with the BC-780XLT? They are no longer made but they still sell for a pretty price! What's up with that?
    Last edited by Echos13; 12-18-2005, 02:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    One time, at a site, when Excelsior Defense used commerical 800 repeater radios (trunked on a commercial trunk), I had a big rig pull into the mobile home construction account I was guarding. (If you know this site, please do not reveal company sites, as it gives the competition the ability to target more sites to steal!)

    Big rigs delivered goods to the construction company. This guy's rig was festoon with antennas. Lots of them, different types, I couldn't make sense out of most of them. He had everything from CB whips to 800s to 2 meter and HTs.

    Guy gets out, and we talk for a bit. He was a communications specialist in the US Air Force. Crypto guy. His rig basically had all the non-classified (And probally some classified) communications gear he could jam into it. He hit radio rebroadcast, and I could hear my own frequency. He then went over to the Sheriff's frequency, then over to CIS... He was having fun picking up Tampa, as well, even if they were across the bay.

    He noted that he did some side work for a three letter agency, and it was the easiest work he ever did. Just let his rig record what it hears, and turn the tapes over to someone.

    I have no idea if he was BSing me or not, after all, he didn't know who I was, but if an old AF Commo Guy could pick up commercially encrypted voice channels, I guarantee you, others can.

    I remember reading about the Law Enforcement Communications Center at U.S. Customs, which spearheads the communications for federal law enforcement - keeping one step ahead of the drug runners and other advisarial groups constantly cracking the (now) FPS LE comm network to listen in and counter Customs, Navy, USCG operations.

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    If you put it over the air there's a good chance someone will hear it.
    Attached Files

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    And a few more for your entertainment.
    Attached Files

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