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  • security k-9

    I havent heard of too many companies recently that use k-9s, i might talk with our boss about it once we get enough staff, to have 1 k-9 unit that will walk through our apt communites 1-2 times a week, to "search for drugs" since most of our communites have "high amounts of drug users/dealers in them" to maybe help weed out the bad folks :P i think the community managers wouldnt mind because it would be proactive security rather than reactive.....

    whats your opinion good idea? bad idea ?
    When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

  • #2
    Company a few miles north of me uses K-9s for drug and protection. If you want a good look at what K-9's can do for a security company like yours, go to http://www.cisworldservices.org

    Keep in mind that your boss' insurance provider will have puppies of its own when it finds out you want to deploy dogs.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

    Comment


    • #3
      nice program they have there, we are a much small company with 6 properties we serve, and only one really being out of control, right now we have a 10pm curfew for the property, and it seems to work ok, but there are still drug problems, and criminal activity, and well a new management company has come onto that property and wants to pay only 3175 dollars a month, for security services, right now the area on a "restricted security plan" which means there is a officer in the pool area for 4 hrs, the officer leaves for 2hrs then comes back for 3 hrs, to enforce curfew, and etc..

      but since the new managment company has only been in for a month, our boss will work with them to get a more stable contract. nothing like what the cis guys do.

      but the k-9 thing would be to have 1 k-9 officer doing mobile drug rounds at all the properties..

      so lets say at 1 am officer checks property aaa
      then if finds anything notifies pd
      then 2 am officer checks property bbb
      and etc..

      if the officer finds stuff, great weed them out, if not no harm done..
      When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

      Comment


      • #4
        I work at a college and they're considering it. I really want to put in for it, but they're requiring a 5-year committment. I don't want to sign on for that long. I like my job, but I hope to be a police officer of some sort within 5 years.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by IB107
          I havent heard of too many companies recently that use k-9s, i might talk with our boss about it once we get enough staff, to have 1 k-9 unit that will walk through our apt communites 1-2 times a week, to "search for drugs" since most of our communites have "high amounts of drug users/dealers in them" to maybe help weed out the bad folks :P i think the community managers wouldnt mind because it would be proactive security rather than reactive.....

          whats your opinion good idea? bad idea ?
          IB107 the first thing that must be considered is the care, training and maintenance of the animal. The handler may not just take the weekend off and let someone else care for his animal. If the insurance carrier determines there is just too much liability for the handler to take the K-9 home, it must be kenneled at the business or at a well-maintained neutral site. If the K-9 is kenneled at the owner's home, who funds the building of an outdoor running and exercise area. What is to become of the animal when it is too old to work efficiently? Some other thoughts come from my security guide.
          (1) Working dog teams?

          (a) What agency originally trained and certified both the dog and its handler? Are United States Police K-9 Association and International Association of Chiefs of Police guidelines followed regarding selection, training, retention, certification and recertification?

          (b) How often are working-dog teams retrained and recertified? Daily training? Remember “training for error” and “cognitive set error.” Have the curricula vitae of the instructors been verified? Good records maintained? Are any dogs trained as sentry dogs that are to bite no matter circumstances? When are dogs permitted to bite? When the subject has been neutralized, will the dog still bite? Are records of dog bites and circumstances surrounding the bite maintained? What office within the corporation is responsible for reviewing all dog bites?

          (c) Is disciplinary action taken against the handler when bites are adjudged unwarranted? Is disciplinary action taken against supervisors when they have knowledge of misconduct and immediate actions were not taken?

          (d) What agency is responsible for recertification?

          (e) How reliable are the working dog teams? How is this reliability determined?

          The decision to deploy K-9s should not be made on a whim!

          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

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          • #6
            Now that is one thing I dislike. Dogs trained to bite no matter what. You then release them into the fenced in area. Its like releasing a guided missile and forgetting about it.

            As I've stated before, we had guided missiles (I mean dogs) on a property next to ours. They annoyed us greatly, and when a fence hole was discovered, the site became a 'patrol from vehicle, do not get out, we'll fax the log sheet to the client' contract for that night. The dog handler company couldn't be reached, and we had no idea where their sentry dogs were!

            Found out they didn't care about the fence hole, they didn't want to leave their property for some reason.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              A K-9 partner is an excellent idea. Many criminals will think twice before pulling a stupid stunt when they hear or see a trained dog. In fact, I would prefer a K-9 to being armed. The dog’s keen senses are great for alerting one to an ambush or hidden intruder. When the dog is equipped with a vest, it can even take down armed subjects. Based on some of the dangerous sites that many of you are posted at, I bet you would feel better having a K-9 partner too.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                Now that is one thing I dislike. Dogs trained to bite no matter what. You then release them into the fenced in area. Its like releasing a guided missile and forgetting about it.

                As I've stated before, we had guided missiles (I mean dogs) on a property next to ours. They annoyed us greatly, and when a fence hole was discovered, the site became a 'patrol from vehicle, do not get out, we'll fax the log sheet to the client' contract for that night. The dog handler company couldn't be reached, and we had no idea where their sentry dogs were!

                Found out they didn't care about the fence hole, they didn't want to leave their property for some reason.
                I remember the sentry dogs in the military versus military working dogs. MWD's would bite when told by the handler, sentry dogs inside a secure area and would bite anything. Reminds me of a funny story from the air force. Bunch of us were standing around outside the kennels waiting for guardmount. Saw a dog wander out and everyone looks around for the handler, until we hear someone yell its a sentry dog that got loose. Never saw one dog tree 16 grown men armed with automatic weapons so fast in my life.
                Other than that haven't seen much use of K-9's by private security, I remember Pinkerton ran a unit about 20 years ago and a nearby shipyard has k-9's. The deterrent value is fantastic, but too much political fallout and lawsuits if a dog were to actually bite a suspect.
                Old age and treachery will defeat youth and enthusiasm every time-

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Security
                  A K-9 partner is an excellent idea. Many criminals will think twice before pulling a stupid stunt when they hear or see a trained dog. In fact, I would prefer a K-9 to being armed. The dog’s keen senses are great for alerting one to an ambush or hidden intruder. When the dog is equipped with a vest, it can even take down armed subjects. Based on some of the dangerous sites that many of you are posted at, I bet you would feel better having a K-9 partner too.
                  On a COPS show an 2 officers had a guy cornered(?) under a house. He was in the crawl space and they were at the only entrance.

                  One of the officers started talking about "the dog" and barking.
                  The guy came out crying and begging for them not to send "the dog" in.

                  Something to keep in mind about using a dog is IT DOES NOT REPLACE A WEAPON! Some bad guys have been known to shoot the dog and then the handler for siccing him. Also a knife is a good weapon against a dog, you will get bit but the dog will die then the unarmed handler will have to deal with one VERY POd and irate individual.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ACP01
                    On a COPS show an 2 officers had a guy cornered(?) under a house. He was in the crawl space and they were at the only entrance.

                    One of the officers started talking about "the dog" and barking.
                    The guy came out crying and begging for them not to send "the dog" in.

                    Something to keep in mind about using a dog is IT DOES NOT REPLACE A WEAPON! Some bad guys have been known to shoot the dog and then the handler for siccing him. Also a knife is a good weapon against a dog, you will get bit but the dog will die then the unarmed handler will have to deal with one VERY POd and irate individual.
                    I've never seen an unarmed K-9 handler in my experience. To not arm a handler is insane in my belief, the use of a K-9 unit means you expect them to be in a high risk/value area. I agree with you 100 percent.
                    Old age and treachery will defeat youth and enthusiasm every time-

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                      IB107 the first thing that must be considered is the care, training and maintenance of the animal. The handler may not just take the weekend off and let someone else care for his animal. If the insurance carrier determines there is just too much liability for the handler to take the K-9 home, it must be kenneled at the business or at a well-maintained neutral site. If the K-9 is kenneled at the owner's home, who funds the building of an outdoor running and exercise area. What is to become of the animal when it is too old to work efficiently? Some other thoughts come from my security guide.
                      (1) Working dog teams?

                      (a) What agency originally trained and certified both the dog and its handler? Are United States Police K-9 Association and International Association of Chiefs of Police guidelines followed regarding selection, training, retention, certification and recertification?

                      (b) How often are working-dog teams retrained and recertified? Daily training? Remember “training for error” and “cognitive set error.” Have the curricula vitae of the instructors been verified? Good records maintained? Are any dogs trained as sentry dogs that are to bite no matter circumstances? When are dogs permitted to bite? When the subject has been neutralized, will the dog still bite? Are records of dog bites and circumstances surrounding the bite maintained? What office within the corporation is responsible for reviewing all dog bites?

                      (c) Is disciplinary action taken against the handler when bites are adjudged unwarranted? Is disciplinary action taken against supervisors when they have knowledge of misconduct and immediate actions were not taken?

                      (d) What agency is responsible for recertification?

                      (e) How reliable are the working dog teams? How is this reliability determined?

                      The decision to deploy K-9s should not be made on a whim!

                      Enjoy the day,
                      Bill


                      very good points it would be something that would be discussed, it would be purely a narc dog, so it would not be trained to bite, just trained to sniff and find.
                      When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by IB107
                        very good points it would be something that would be discussed, it would be purely a narc dog, so it would not be trained to bite, just trained to sniff and find.
                        IB107, those dogs do exist they are taught to sniff for narcotics and some other dangerous drugs. They are either taught to sit or to paw the container. Then you have the explosives detection. They are taught to "sit" when an explosive is detected. If they paw a suspected container they, both handler and dog, go to their respective rewards. The patrol dog is taught to do patrol first and if additional duties are required, given the temperment of the dog, they may learn either explosives or drugs.
                        For those seriously interested, the United States Police K-9 Association is the best place to begin.
                        Enjoy the day,
                        Bill
                        Last edited by Bill Warnock; 06-07-2006, 03:22 PM. Reason: correct spelling

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                        • #13
                          A guy who used to work for me is now an investigator with the fire department. He is trying to get them interested in getting a dog that snifs out gasoline & other flammable liquids.
                          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HotelSecurity
                            A guy who used to work for me is now an investigator with the fire department. He is trying to get them interested in getting a dog that snifs out gasoline & other flammable liquids.
                            Hotel Security, there are just such dogs on arson squads. Canada is among many nations who have representatives to the International Association of Fire Chiefs, International Association of Fire Marshals and International Association of Arson Investigators. Each one of these organizations have representatives in an advisory capacity to the United States Police K-9 Association.
                            These canine are used for the detection of suspected accelerants.
                            Enjoy the day,
                            Bill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Since I don't own a Gun, I have this as my Home Protection:



                              I have kids, so I don't want a gun. I actually have 4 dogs. This is just one of them.
                              Last edited by dla4122; 06-07-2006, 07:57 PM. Reason: forgot a word.

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