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bad boy, bad boy, what would you do ?

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  • #16
    As far as abandoning a post a couple hours early... From what you described, the officer likely deserves termination.
    "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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    • #17
      That's my thing for 10-codes, too. And I don't believe that private security should use the same 10 codes as public police, either. One of the reasons for this is that the bad guys have already learned the public police ten codes.

      If you hear 10-80 getting a warrant check, the bad guy knows that you know he has a warrant. If you hear another signal code, then he has no idea what you're doing. You could be ordering a pizza with his ID!
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #18
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
        My only question is: Is this guy contract?

        Usually, with a contract company, the client can not order a contract employee to do anything. Especially relating to hours, discipline, or changing of post orders.

        What they can do is put it in the log book as a directive, then the contract employee calls contract management (the supervisor) and gets it approved. Until that's done, its a request.

        I know that if the client asked an employee to go into personal OT without the contract company's authorization, or the ability to put a non OT person out there... there'd be hell to pay.
        yes we are contract but it was OUR company owners, not the client owners
        When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

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        • #19
          out here in utah, 99.9 precent of the agencies use UHP (utah highway patrol) 10- codes, and thus that is what we use in our company, 10-42 means off duty.
          our company prefers us to use 10-codes because we use the PD's old 400 mhz radio system. since they went to a 900 mhz/1200 mhz digital system recently, so that cant be trunked tracked to easy now.....
          When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by IB107
            out here in utah, 99.9 precent of the agencies use UHP (utah highway patrol) 10- codes, and thus that is what we use in our company, 10-42 means off duty.
            our company prefers us to use 10-codes because we use the PD's old 400 mhz radio system. since they went to a 900 mhz/1200 mhz digital system recently, so that cant be trunked tracked to easy now.....
            Seems lots of cities are spending good money changing to digital systems thinking they can't be scanned. They can - the scanners just cost a little more & with more places changing the prices are coming down. Now ENCRIPTED digital trunked systems they are secure. (For now )
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by IB107
              our company prefers us to use 10-codes because we use the PD's old 400 mhz radio system. since they went to a 900 mhz/1200 mhz digital system recently, so that cant be trunked tracked to easy now.....
              I have a very good friend in West Jordan who works for VECC....

              1. 800 mhz, not 900 or 1200.
              2. Analog, not digital.
              3. Easy to track.

              Who gave your guys this mis-info? Your company or local cops?

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              • #22
                VECC = salt lake county not salt lake city

                salt lake city pd has its own dispatch.. and is switching over to 900/1200 mhz this fall. our boss is ex-slcpd as of last year, thus im sure the info he was given when on the force, is probally more acurate than what the county dispatch knows, since slcpd will be switching this fall, the installed some test equipment last year, and like it better.
                When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

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                • #23
                  It's a little off topic but since I'm interested in the similarities & differences between our 2 countries....

                  Did you know that it is LEGAL to listen to cell phone calls in Canada? The only problem is that most scanners are made in the US where it is illegal & they have had these frequencies blocked. (Most can be unblocked). I don't listen however because it's boring!

                  On the other hand a new law was recently passed making it illegal to listen to DIGITAL frequencies in Canada without a license. Problem is that no one I've asked knows what license they are talking about. We suspect it's a Ham license.
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by IB107
                    our company prefers us to use 10-codes because we use the PD's old 400 mhz radio system.
                    Just curious, but why would the fact you use the PD's old 400 mhz system dictate the use of 10-codes?
                    "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by IB107
                      VECC = salt lake county not salt lake city

                      salt lake city pd has its own dispatch.. and is switching over to 900/1200 mhz this fall. our boss is ex-slcpd as of last year, thus im sure the info he was given when on the force, is probally more acurate than what the county dispatch knows, since slcpd will be switching this fall, the installed some test equipment last year, and like it better.
                      -You can't make a 1200 mhz trunked system. No one makes the equipment, and besides, that band is reserved for air navigation and amateur radio by the FCC.

                      -900 mhz is for private land-mobile systems, paging and ISM low-power devices. I think the temple has or used to have a system there. The only goverment use in that band is federal government, fixed, point-to-point use.

                      -SLC doesn't have any digital emission licenses through the FCC. They do have some NBFM stuff, but that's still analog.

                      Last but not least, my friend isn't in dispatch with VECC, he's in RF engineering.
                      Last edited by OccamsRazor; 05-27-2006, 05:03 PM. Reason: Spelling

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by davis002
                        FEMA points out that in Washington, DC, if a police officer says 10-50, he or she is talking about a car accident. Across the line in Montgomery County, Maryland, 10-50 means an officer needs help.
                        I know it's odd to quote myself, but listen to the attached audio to understand what I meant about the confusion over the 10-50.

                        Listen to the Dispatch Transmission
                        "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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                        • #27
                          Here the code 10-50 means "Negative", the opposite of 10-4 as in -
                          "Hey unit 3, you you have my flashlight?"
                          "10-50. Maybe you left it at the station."
                          To make it even more confusing, in addition to 10 codes there are Signal codes. For example, "What's your 10-20?" means what's your location but "There's a signal 20 on Main Street" means there's a motor vehicle accident.
                          Before NIMS, and the move to plain language instead of 10 codes, when our fire station would be paged out and the Trucks would go ENROUTE they were "10-8". Right across the parish line in Baton Rouge when a fire truck left the station enroute to a call they were "10-55". Two different codes in two neighboring districts for the same action.
                          Hospital Security Officer

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                          • #28
                            10-50 is a traffic stop in my area. another city its request for tow truck.
                            The signals get confusing. take this sentence for instance. echo 33(call sign) 10-24 subject is signal 1. which in laymans terms is officer needs emergency help, the subject is armed and dangerous.
                            Last edited by bigdog; 05-27-2006, 07:16 PM.
                            "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

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                            • #29
                              well our bosses ended up letting the kid go. his loss but when the owner of your company you work for asks you to do something, and you flat out refuse, dont even explain why you may not be able to do what is being asked, i do believe that our company owners were correct in the firing. after all if he would have said well i have a family sitituation or something to take care of im sure the owner would have let him go home with out any recourse, but if you just "hang" up on the owner its bye bye time .
                              When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

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