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bad boy, bad boy, what would you do ?

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  • bad boy, bad boy, what would you do ?

    So tonight we have a rookie on shift, one of the owners asked him to stay till 5 am, even though the other owner had put him on sced till 3am over two weeks ago, the second owner of the company told him he talked with owner number 1 and they wanted him to stay till 5am, well the officer called 10-42 at 3am, and did not reply when the owner called him back on the radio, and or his cell/home phone. so now the second owner of the company will be considering firing him, for two things, 1. leaving the post unathorized 2. defiance/subordination(sp?)

    I agree with the second owner on this, esp if it was only for 2 hrs more, and that it is one of the two company owners asking you to stay, and the officer was still in his first week of training, first day alone at a site.
    When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

  • #2
    If it was florida he commited a misdemeanor once he left the site.Its call abondonment of post.Your security license could be revoked and if someone gets hurt when your are off the post you are assigned during duty hrs and someone gets hurt it becomes a felony cuplible negligence. So Id fire the guy.
    "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

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    • #3
      How did this new guard respond when he was informed that his shift had been extended to 0500? Did he agree to it?
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #4
        he told the owner #2 that owner #1 said he was off at 3am, and owner #2 asked him to stay, but the officer 10-42d, didnt say anything else. he has about
        a 95% chance of being dimissed, be cause he, he told owner #2 he was too tired.... its only 2 hrs.. its not that hard to pull the extra two... not like he was asking for 4hrs..
        When not at work or out watching a moive.. passed out at the keyboard.

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        • #5
          If he can't communicate any better than that, then he's asking for it. As "The Donald" would say: "You're FIRED!"
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            [QUOTE=IB107] called 10-42 at 3am, and did not reply when the owner called him back on the radio, and or his cell/home phone. QUOTE)

            Just a humorous side note. First thought struck me fun. "This guy sounds like management material." Sorry, it was funny at the time.

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            • #7
              We have a 12 hour max shift rule, anything less than that and you stay if required.

              He abandoned his post - bye bye.
              "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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              • #8
                My only question is: Is this guy contract?

                Usually, with a contract company, the client can not order a contract employee to do anything. Especially relating to hours, discipline, or changing of post orders.

                What they can do is put it in the log book as a directive, then the contract employee calls contract management (the supervisor) and gets it approved. Until that's done, its a request.

                I know that if the client asked an employee to go into personal OT without the contract company's authorization, or the ability to put a non OT person out there... there'd be hell to pay.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #9
                  Our contract officers can be required by us to stay as well. In the contract is a provision about covering open posts. Leaving would cause the post to go open, so they can be required to stay put.

                  What normally happens though is we ask if anyone wants to stay overtime voluntarily - usually someone will, but when no one does the choice is made on who gets to stay.
                  "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aka Bull
                    Our contract officers can be required by us to stay as well. In the contract is a provision about covering open posts. Leaving would cause the post to go open, so they can be required to stay put.

                    What normally happens though is we ask if anyone wants to stay overtime voluntarily - usually someone will, but when no one does the choice is made on who gets to stay.
                    All contracts I have worked, if the guard has forehand knowledge that the post will be left open, they are to contact company management immediately so that relief for that guard can be found. Usually by the salary supervisor.

                    Having an open post is one thing, as long as the employee immediately contacts their superivsor to arrange for relief. But forehand knowledge is shooting your employer in the back.
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      All contracts I have worked, if the guard has forehand knowledge that the post will be left open, they are to contact company management immediately so that relief for that guard can be found. Usually by the salary supervisor.

                      Having an open post is one thing, as long as the employee immediately contacts their superivsor to arrange for relief. But forehand knowledge is shooting your employer in the back.
                      The contract officer here is does not contact the company. The senior in-house officer on duty (usually a Lead Officer or Supervisor) notifies the contract company site lead officer to find a replacement for the officer. Failing contact with the site lead officer - which happens too much IMO, we call that person's boss at the company and get him to find coverage.

                      We have had too many problems in the past with not having the line of communication running through us to the company - like contract officers who fail to take any action to notify their company.

                      And this isn't a perfect situation by any means. Many times we just end up working short staffed and having officers double up duties - no fun but what else can you do.
                      "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." -Aristotle

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                      • #12
                        What does code 10-42 mean? I'm a scanner buff. Each of the services I san have their own 10 code. Is 10-42 a standard code used by all contract security companies in the States?

                        As for abandonment. Last year I hired a guy to work what we call a "babysitting" shift. (Sitting in the corridor of the hotel overnight outside rooms occupied by young students on a school tour). It was explained clearly to him exactly what the work consisted of. He was told it would be boring & to bring a book. 2 hours into his shift he disappeared. He would not answer his phone when I tried to reach him over the next few days to try & find out what happened. Unfortunately being In-House we are not licensed. I checked with our company lawyer. There was nothing we could do about it. However, as someone else said. If one of the kids had been hurt as a result of him taking off, he could have been charged criminally.
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HotelSecurity
                          What does code 10-42 mean? I'm a scanner buff. Each of the services I san have their own 10 code. Is 10-42 a standard code used by all contract security companies in the States?

                          .
                          10-42, as used in this case, means "Enroute Home" or "At my Home". It's not really a standard since any agency can decide to use different codes for different things. That's the reason National Incident Management System (NIMS) training teaches the immportance of abandoning codes such as these and using plain language. Good article about the move to plain speech in this month's MRT- http://mrtmag.com/mag/radio_doubleed...ord/index.html .
                          Hospital Security Officer

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                          • #14
                            Based on the context it was used in, I would assume 10-42 meant Out of Service. There is no standard 10-code format in the states... Not just with security, but with LE as well. You can listen to one county dispatch center, then go over to the next county, and get completely confused by what they're saying, as the codes will be totally different.
                            When I moved up here from Oregon, I had to completely re-learn the 10-codes. Frustrating, to say the least.

                            I seem to remember hearing a while back that the govt. was considering creating a standardized 10-code system to help in emergency situations when multiple departments get involved, but I never heard what the outcome was.
                            Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                            Originally posted by ValleyOne
                            BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                            Shoulda called in sick.
                            Be safe!

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                            • #15
                              I seem to remember hearing a while back that the govt. was considering creating a standardized 10-code system to help in emergency situations when multiple departments get involved, but I never heard what the outcome was.
                              Actually, most recently the federal govt. (DHS/FEMA) wants to see 10-codes be abolished. Beginning in the fiscal year that starts October 1, 2006, federal preparedness grant funding is contingent on the use of plain English in incidents requiring assistance from responders from other agencies, jurisdictions and functional disciplines.
                              So in other words, when it comes to multi-agency, multi-jurisdiction and multi-discipline events... DHS/FEMA will require that plain english be used. Anyone here that has taken ICS-100, will know exactly what i'm talking about. FEMA points out that in Washington, DC, if a police officer says 10-50, he or she is talking about a car accident. Across the line in Montgomery County, Maryland, 10-50 means an officer needs help. Honestly, I never liked 10-codes.
                              At the same time, it is nice to be discreet when others can overhear your communications. If someone calls in for a warrant check, and I find out that person has a felony warrant, I really don't want to radio back to my officer and tell him "your party has a felony warrant out of Hennepin county for Burglary". In that case, a simple "10-80" (Active Warrant) is better.
                              "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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