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  • #16
    re

    I worked an oil field HQ, easy work but slow on pay, that lasted about 2 months.. and I was looking again.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
      Never told you about that in D or G school, did they? That's "value added services" for you.
      It was the "value added services" that drove me crazy at one site. I didn't mind checking fire extinguishers and eyewash stations because safety and security are interrelated. Good experience to. Then one day they asked us to start checking over a hundred filthy rodent traps every week to see if anything was dead in the trap. Now they have the guards emptying dehumidifiers and checking drains to make sure their not clogged. Everything BUT security, even though this huge complex only has 1 security officer.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #18
        Mr. Security's experience can be a godsend to security officers. It may sound menial, but you can see so much more than you would ever see being on standard patrol. You can ask clean up crews what they know and have seen while you are checking rodent traps. You are now ubiquitous, no longer a threat. People see you everywhere and think nothing of it. From my experience, there is a treasure trove awaiting the security officer or security inspector or security consultant if the or she plays their cards right. Played correctly, that extra duty will pay handsomely.
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Bill Warnock
          Mr. Security's experience can be a godsend to security officers. It may sound menial, but you can see so much more than you would ever see being on standard patrol. You can ask clean up crews what they know and have seen while you are checking rodent traps. You are now ubiquitous, no longer a threat. People see you everywhere and think nothing of it. From my experience, there is a treasure trove awaiting the security officer or security inspector or security consultant if the or she plays their cards right. Played correctly, that extra duty will pay handsomely.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill
          They are currently looking for a s/o at this site. Let me know if you're interested.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #20
            When I first started I had an advantage, Air Force Training which set me up. They told us to pick up a piece of paper or other trash in squadron areas other than our own. The things we learned. Soon, no security police person could clean up another area. We found so much stuff.
            Those who want to leave so soon are those who are still new in the business or those who just don't care.
            Hang tough!
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Bill Warnock
              They told us to pick up a piece of paper or other trash in squadron areas other than our own. The things we learned.
              Which is fine along as there is someone else to monitor the site for security while other tasks are being accomplished. As I explained, if the only guard is performing non-security functions, no one is 'watching the store.'
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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              • #22
                Mr Security, point well taken. It would be foolish for the leadership to send the only officer available to do not security work and leave the security post unmanned. Not all leadership is familiar with security principles and procedures.
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                  Mr Security, point well taken. It would be foolish for the leadership to send the only officer available to do not security work and leave the security post unmanned. Not all leadership is familiar with security principles and procedures.
                  Enjoy the day,
                  Bill
                  This is something we constantly had to explain to clients. Adding services is all well and good, but there better be:

                  1. Written Amendment to the Contract for Services Added.
                  2. Clear language indicating that the security company is NOT liable for security breaches or disorder while the guard is performing ancillary duties.
                  3. Client acknoledgement that these other duties are not related to the primary contractual obligation, and will hamper the contractor from performing these duties, and waiver of liability for failure to perform primary duties.

                  We had a hotel where the security officer was required to take towels and plunge toilets. We refused, to the man, not because taking towels was a bad thing, but because while the officer is taking towels, he is no longer performing his job function, and leaving the site unprotected. This places the security company and the officer civilly and criminally liable for negligence, as they're not performing their contractual obligation and legal duty. Just because the client calls and says "Do this," dosen't mean that you should be doing it. They need to submit it in writing, and then new post orders issued, or else its a case of "We never told the guard to take towels, that was the front desk acting on their own."
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                    They need to submit it in writing, and then new post orders issued, or else its a case of "We never told the guard to take towels, that was the front desk acting on their own."
                    Excellent post. Incidentally, my former company's 'value added services,' described above, were not in the post orders. Unlikely that they ever will be until they experience the problem you noted. Wish you had been the account manager when I worked there!
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security
                      Excellent post. Incidentally, my former company's 'value added services,' described above, were not in the post orders. Unlikely that they ever will be until they experience the problem you noted. Wish you had been the account manager when I worked there!
                      This is a constant issue, I've come to realize, and the sales account managers will do anything to placiate the client, because they're not versed in selling negatives.

                      Instead of selling floor moppers, they could be selling other services, such as community interaction, neighborhood watch coordination, safety monitoring and reporting, etc. But, clients believe "security and maintenance are one in the same," and since both maintenance workers and security guards are paid low wages, they are obviously interchangable.

                      Indeed, residential management companies have used maintenance personnel, during the day, to do such things as cite improperly parked vehicles, issue citations (worthless paper), arrange tows, handle noise complaints, order children not to play in the street, and generally act as a security officer - most likely without these duties being in the job code for that employee.

                      The issue, of course, is that deep down, the client does not see a security officer as a trained individual, and that anyone can do his job, therefore, the security officer should be able to switch gears and do other menial service tasks. Those that resist obviously do not "know their place," and the client requests they be removed. The sales manager, afraid of losing the revenue, will cave in.

                      If the company does not rely on any one client for more than 25% of their profit generation, then the company is in a position to resist value added services, and pushy clients. A company that can cut loose a troublesome client is a company that can focus on providing superior services - eventually clients who expect that level of service will hear about them.

                      "Did you hear that Acme Condos was let go by Protective Services Group? They tried to get their guards to mop floors."
                      "I heard their people look professional, I saw them out at the shopping mall."
                      "Weren't they in the paper about getting that city contract, they protect half of downtown now."
                      "I think we need to dump our guard company and call them, I can't even read this guy's handwriting."
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Watchdog
                        Any post where I'm scheduled to work 12 hours or more where I can't leave the post and where I don't have anyone to relieve me so I can take 30-60 minutes off a take a break and get away for a bit.
                        Security companies seem to think that one can just bring a lunch in a bag and be all comfy for the whole day sitting or standing in one place.
                        That's why I prefer doing some type of mobile patrol when I can.
                        Thats how my assignment is for lunch. We dont go off clock for a break we eat lunch on the job. We take in in lunch box coolers. I tell you sometimes eating sandwiches all damn week gets to suck lol. But i take different stuff sometimes. and once in a while i might just buy something up at the gas station when i stop by for the rest room.

                        Stay Safe All

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by S/O245
                          Thats how my assignment is for lunch. We dont go off clock for a break we eat lunch on the job. We take in in lunch box coolers. I tell you sometimes eating sandwiches all damn week gets to suck lol. But i take different stuff sometimes. and once in a while i might just buy something up at the gas station when i stop by for the rest room.

                          Stay Safe All
                          Better than eating MREs, at least.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            My worst site was during the formation of the company I work for now ( McKeen Security) I started with Advanced Security when they took over Bedway Security. The person that ran Bedway security decided to start his own business (McKeens) anyhow now that is explained ,the job site was an old rock portal (coal mine) in the northern pan handle of West Virginia. We were told that methane gas was escaping from the portal and the area had to be kept clear of campfires , vehicles and people. Well doesnt sound hard but there was no where to sit but in your car , no bathroom facilities and the only contact you had was a cell phone that worked sometimes.

                            My biggest thing was that they wanted us to go into the woods and tell people to put their fires out. Now i dont know if you all know the WVA area very well but im not about to go into the dark woods towards someones camp and scare the crap out of people in a state that has a concealed carry permit law and the fact that its WVA where every tom dick and harry are probally packin anyway cause they are on a campin trip. NO THANKS

                            anyway to make a long story short McKeens opened up his company and 96% of the employees went to McKeens , so I got stuck out at that site for 23 1/2 hours thanks to my wonderful boss Greg Bremalowe. Needless to say I went to McKeens also and have been there since. I think all Private security Companys have there fair share of CRAP sites.

                            Well ill stop blabberin

                            Dan

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                            • #29
                              I always hated corporate posts where you say at the front desk like a receptionist and repeated"Elevators are down the hall and the restrooms are behind the potted plants.NOT the potted plants,you jerk!"
                              ANY post that had a De-tex clock and a specified route that I had to follow is also on my list.Just to make sure someone couldn't time me,after I learned the layout of the post,I'd change the order in which I hit the keys.I always got called on it and my answer was usually the same:We should not set a routine where we are seen to be checking the same areas and the exact same times each shift.I got few gripes about it after i caught a couple guys breaking into a paint building after my days off when they'd watched my relief go about his tours and then back to his TV set.
                              I much rather have been assigned to driving patrols,still watches or walking posts than those.
                              Last edited by doughesson; 12-06-2005, 06:10 PM.

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                              • #30
                                In my civilian government career, I received permission to take a part-time job with a security company to try to learn the ins and outs of private and corporate security. First assignment, unarmed guard!
                                When given a tour of a plant with a security company supervisor, I marked each location of the Detex Clock check-in on a notebook. When left on my own, I varied the route to insure not to establish a set pattern. When the company supervisor read the clock's punch patterns he asked me why I had not followed the exact pattern he demonstrated. I explained my rationale and noted that each clock station was punched each time in a different pattern. Further, I reminded him he had briefed me that the plant was experiencing stock theft, and by varying routes we could break-up those thefts. I also told him I had removed the various colored ribbons hanging from the perimeter fence. Different colors represented pick-up points for various types of materials. The local plant security manager, an additional duty with no previous experience, was surprised the colored ribbons were for that purpose. The company supervisor was just as surprised. I was able to make the rounds without further comment.
                                After a week of night duty, I was moved to another site because the company's intelligence people developed information that there was a real threat made on my life. As an aside, thefts stopped and they assigned two armed guards in the plant.
                                I learned about the colored ribbons affixed to fences at the Army Physical Security Course, held at the MP School, at that time Fort Gordon, GA.
                                Interesting experience.
                                Enjoy the day,
                                Bill

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